BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 3 von 4 ErsteErste 1234 LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 21 bis 30 von 31

DER BALKANKRIEG

Erstellt von Gast829627, 20.02.2006, 14:29 Uhr · 30 Antworten · 6.502 Aufrufe

  1. #21
    Gast829627
    Zitat Zitat von Ivo2
    Zitat Zitat von Legija
    8O 8O :? :? .....du weisst hoffentlich ,das sich im zunehmenden alter der geist zurückentwickelt.....also es fängt meistens bei 50 an und da du weit drüber bist kannst du dir bestimmt vorstellen ,das das niveau eines sonderschülers um längen deins übertrifft
    Auch hier liegst du falsch Hab' aber auch nichts anderes erwartet

    Zitat Zitat von Legija
    und was den zusammenhang am atentat mit dem geheimdienst angeht ...kannst du mir das gegenteil beweisen

    oder noch besser liefer doch quellen von irving
    Geheimdienst nicht genau, sondern eher Geheimbund, genannt Black Hand (Schwarze Hand, Crna Ruka)
    Ich frag' mich wirklich wie man so unglaublich blöd sein kann, das Attentat von Gavrilo Princip an dem österr. Thrinfolger dem KuK Geheimdienst unter jubeln zu wollen.
    Ich glaube Geschichtsfälscher wie du, oder deine Quellen haben überhaupt keinen Genierer
    Übrigens Irving wurde jetzt zu 3 Jahren Haft in Österreich verknackt. Bei den herschenden Gesetzen in Serbien, wäre er nicht mal angeklackt worden.
    ne stimmt angekackt hätte man ihn net aber hinter gitter gebracht 8)

    und was die beteiligung der crna ruka angeht ist auch nicht eindeutig bewiesen sondern nur eine vermutung die auch so in den geschoichtsbüchern überliefert wurde was aber den geheimdienst der KuK angeht liefer mir doch ein gegenbeweis dafür.....

  2. #22
    Avatar von Ivo2

    Registriert seit
    13.07.2004
    Beiträge
    19.007
    Zitat Zitat von Legija
    ne stimmt angekackt hätte man ihn net aber hinter gitter gebracht 8)
    Hmmm, da müssten ja ca. 30% der Bevölkerung hinter Gitter sitzen
    Zitat Zitat von Legija
    und was die beteiligung der crna ruka angeht ist auch nicht eindeutig bewiesen sondern nur eine vermutung die auch so in den geschoichtsbüchern überliefert wurde was aber den geheimdienst der KuK angeht liefer mir doch ein gegenbeweis dafür.....
    Die Beteiligung von Crna Ruka ist zu 100% nachgewiesen. Einziges was nicht 100% nachgewiesen war, war die Verstrickung der serbischen Regierung bzw. des antisemtischen Prinzregent Aleksandar.
    Nach zu lesen in jedem Geschichtsbuch.
    Serbian Blame: The Assassins
    To assess the degree of Serbian guilt, we should look in three places: the young Bosnian assassins, their backers in Serbia, and the Serbian government.

    Franz Ferdinand, his wife Sophie Chotek, and Governor Potiorek (in an open car) passed seven assassins as their procession drove through Sarajevo. A look at the actual participants tells us something about South Slav nationalist dissatisfaction in Habsburg-ruled Bosnia.

    The first conspirator along the parade route was Mehmed Mehmedbasic, a 27-year old carpenter, son of an impoverished Bosnian Muslim notable: he had a bomb. After planning a plot of his own to kill Governor Potiorek, Mehmedbasic joined the larger plot.

    When the car passed him, he did nothing: a gendarme stood close by, and Mehmedbasic feared that a botched attempt might spoil the chance for the others. He was the only one of the assassins to escape.

    Next was Vaso Cubrilovic, a 17-year old student armed with a revolver. Cubrilovic was recruited for the plot during a political discussion: in Bosnia in 1914, virtual strangers might plot political murders, if they shared radical interests. Cubrilovic had been expelled from the Tuzla high school for walking out on the Habsburg anthem. Cubrilovic too did nothing, afraid of shooting Duchess Sophie by accident. Under Austrian law, there was no death penalty for juvenile offenders, so Cubrilovic was sentenced to 16 years. In later life became a history professor.

    Nedelko Cabrinovic was the third man, a 20-year old idler on bad terms with his family over his politics: he took part in strikes and read anarchist books. His father ran a cafe, did errands for the local police, and beat his family. Nedelko dropped out of school, and moved from job to job: locksmithing, operating a lathe, and setting type. In 1914 Cabrinovic worked for the Serbian state printing house in Belgrade.

    He was a friend of Gavrilo Princip, who recruited him for the killing, and they travelled together back to Sarajevo. Cabrinovic threw a bomb, but failed to see the car in time to aim well: he missed the heir's car and hit the next one, injuring several people. Cabrinovic swallowed poison and jumped into a canal, but he was saved from suicide and arrested. He died of tuberculosis in prison in 1916.

    The fourth and fifth plotters were standing together. One was Cvetko Popovic, an 18-year old student who seems to have lost his nerve, although he claimed not to have seen the car, being nearsighted. Popovic received a 13-year sentence, and later became a school principal.

    Nearby was 24-year old Danilo Ilic, the main organizer of the plot; he had no weapon. Ilic was raised in Sarajevo by his mother, a laundress. His father was dead, and Ilic worked as a newsboy, a theatre usher, a laborer, a railway porter, a stone-worker and a longshoreman while finishing school; later he was a teacher, a bank clerk, and a nurse during the Balkan Wars. His real vocation was political agitation: he had contacts in Bosnia, with the Black Hand in Serbia, and in the exile community in Switzerland. He obtained the guns and bombs used in the plot. Ilic was executed for the crime.

    The final two of the seven conspirators were farther down the road. Trifko Grabez was a 19-year old Bosnian going to school in Belgrade, where he became friends with Princip. He too did nothing: at his trial he said he was afraid of hurting some nearby women and children, and feared that an innocent friend standing with him would be arrested unjustly. He too died in prison: the Austrians spared few resources for the health of the assassins after conviction.

    Gavrilo Princip was last. Also 19-years old, he was a student who had never held a job. His peasant family owned a tiny farm of four acres, the remnant of a communal zadruga broken up in the 1880s; for extra cash, his father drove a mail coach.

    Gavrilo was sickly but smart: at 13 he went off to the Merchants Boarding School in Sarajevo. He soon turned up his nose at commerce, in favor of literature, poetry, and student politics. For his role in a demonstration, he was expelled and lost his scholarship. In 1912 he went to Belgrade: he never enrolled in school, but dabbled in literature and politics, and somehow made contact with Apis and the Black Hand. During the Balkan Wars he volunteered for the Serbian army, but was rejected as too small and weak.

    On the day of the attack, Princip heard Cabrinovic's bomb go off and assumed that the Archduke was dead. By the time he heard what had really happened, the cars had driven by. By bad luck, a little later the returning procession missed a turn and stopped to back up at a corner just as Princip happened to walk by. Princip fired two shots: one killed the archduke, the other his wife. Princip was arrested before he could swallow his poison capsule or shoot himself. Princip too was a minor under Austrian law, so he could not be executed. Instead he was sentenced to 20 years in prison, and died of tuberculosis in 1916.

    We can make some generalizations about the plotters. All were Bosnian by birth. Most were Serbian, or one might say Orthodox, but one was a Bosnian Muslim: at their trial, the plotters did not speak of Serbian, Croatian or Muslim identity, only their unhappiness with the Habsburgs.

    None of the plotters was older than 27: none of them were old enough to remember the Ottoman regime. Their anger over conditions in Bosnia seems directed simply at the visible authorities. The assassins were not advanced political thinkers: most were high school students. From statements at their trial, the killing seems to have been a symbolic act of protest. Certainly they did not expect it to cause a war between Austria and Serbia.

    A closer look at the victims also supports this view: that symbolic, not real, power was at stake. Assassination attempts were not unusual in Bosnia. Some of the plotters originally planned to kill Governor Potiorek, and only switched to the royal couple at the last minute. Franz Ferdinand had limited political power. He was Emperor Franz Joseph's nephew, and became the heir when Franz Joseph's son killed himself in 1889 (his sisters could not take the throne).

    This position conferred less power than one might think. Franz Ferdinand's wife, Sophie Chotek, was a Bohemian noblewoman, but not noble enough to be royal. She was scorned by many at court, and their children were out of the line of succession (Franz Ferdinand's brother Otto was next). Franz Ferdinand had strong opinions, a sharp tongue and many political enemies. He favored "trialism," adding a third Slavic component to the Dual Monarchy, in part to reduce the influence of the Hungarians. His relations with Budapest were so bad that gossips blamed the killing on Magyar politicians. There have been efforts to say that Serbian politicians had him killed to block his pro-Slav reforms, but the evidence for this is thin.

    Serbian Blame: The Black Hand
    The assassins did not act alone. Who was involved within Serbia, and why? To understand Serbian actions accurately, we must distinguish between the Radical Party led by Prime Minister Pasic, and the circle of radicals in the army around Apis, the man who led the murders of the Serbian royal couple in 1903.

    The role of Apis in 1914 is a matter of guesswork, despite many investigations. The planning was secret, and most of the participants died without making reliable statements . Student groups like Mlada Bosna were capable of hatching murder plots on their own. During 1913 several of the eventual participants talked about murdering General Oskar Potiorek, the provincial Governor, or even Emperor Franz Joseph.

    Once identified as would-be assassins, however, the Bosnian students seem to have been directed toward Franz Ferdinand by Dimitrijevic-Apis, by now a colonel in charge of Serbian intelligence. Princip returned from a trip to Belgrade early in 1914 with a plan to kill Franz Ferdinand, contacts in the Black Hand who later supplied the guns and bombs, and information about the planned June visit by the heir, which Princip would not have known without a leak or tip from within Serbian intelligence.

    In 1917, Apis took credit for planning the killing, but his motives can be questioned: at the time, he was being tried for treason against the Serbian king, and mistakenly believed that his role in the plot would lead to leniency. In fact, the Radical Party and the king were afraid of Apis and had him shot.

    Those who believe Apis was at work point to "trialism" as his motive. Apis is supposed to have seen the heir as the only man capable of reviving Austria-Hungary. If Franz Ferdinand had reorganized the Habsburg Empire on a trialist basis, satisfying the Habsburg South Slavs, Serbian hopes to expand into Bosnia and Croatia would have been blocked. In early June 1914, Apis is said to have decided to give guns and bombs to Princip and his accomplices, and arranged to get the students back over the border into Bosnia without passing through the border checkpoints. Later in the month, other members of the Black Hand ruling council voted to cancel the plan, but by then it was too late to call back the assassins.
    Serbian Blame: Pasic and the State
    While Apis may or may not have been guilty of planning the murder, the murder did not necessarily mean war. There was no irresistible outburst of popular anger after the assassination: Austria-Hungary did not take revenge in hot blood, but waited almost two months. When the Habsburg state did react against Serbia, it was in a calculated manner as we will see in a moment. For now, suffice it to say that the Austrians chose to blame the Pasic government for the crime. How culpable was the Serbian state?

    There is no evidence to suggest that Pasic planned the crime. It is unlikely that the Black Hand officers were acting on behalf of the government, because the military and the Radical Party in fact were engaged in a bitter competition to control the state. After the Balkan Wars, both military and civilian figures claimed the right to administer the newly liberated lands (the so-called Priority Question). After 1903, Pasic knew that Apis' clique would kill to get their way.

    Pasic's responsibility revolves around reports that he was warned of the intended crime, and took inadequate steps to warn Austrian authorities. Despite Pasic's denials, there is substantial testimony that someone alerted him to the plot, and that Pasic ordered the Serbian ambassador in Vienna to tell the Austrians that an attempt would be made on the life of the heir during his visit to Bosnia.

    However, when the Serbian ambassador passed on the warning, he appears to have been too discreet. Instead of saying that he knew of an actual plot, he spoke in terms of a hypothetical assassination attempt, and suggested that a state visit by Franz Ferdinand on the day of Kosovo (June 28) was too provocative.

    Austrian diplomats failed to read between the lines of this vague comment. By the time the warning reached the Habsburg joint finance minister (the man in charge of Bosnian affairs), any sense of urgency had been lost, and he did nothing to increase security or cancel the heir's planned visit. After the murders, the Serbian government was even more reluctant to compromise itself by admitting any knowledge, hence Pasic's later denials.

    If we agree that the Pasic government did not plan the killings, what can we say about their response to the crisis that followed? War in 1914 was not inevitable: did the Serbs work hard enough to avoid it?
    Quelle

    Wenn du Probleme mit dem Englischen hast, your problem

  3. #23
    Rehana
    Zitat Zitat von Ivo2
    Die Beteiligung von Crna Ruka ist zu 100% nachgewiesen. Einziges was nicht 100% nachgewiesen war, war die Verstrickung der serbischen Regierung bzw. des antisemtischen Prinzregent Aleksandar.
    Nach zu lesen in jedem Geschichtsbuch.

    *Quote gekürzt weil sonst zu lang & unästhetisch / Gez.Schiptar*

    Wenn du Probleme mit dem Englischen hast, your problem
    ey pivo,es können nicht alle so wie Du english also ,lass ihn demnächst fragen stellen...!
    Bye Bye Bye

  4. #24
    Crane
    Zitat Zitat von Ivo2
    Zitat Zitat von Legija
    Am 28. 6. 1914 wird in Sarajevo der österreichische Thronfolger Franz Ferdinand und seine Frau durch ein Attentat getötet. Dieses wahrscheinlich vom östereichischen Geheimdienst inszenierte Attentat liefert den Anlass zum österreich-serbischen Krieg.
    Hahahahahahaha, ich kann nicht mehr
    Jovica lässt grüssen
    Ich habe in einer deutschen Doku auch mal davon gehört, dass dieses Attentat inszeniert gewesen sein soll... fands das aber eher als ne ziemlich dumme Vermutung. Der Krieg brach ja bekanntlich erst einen Monat später aus... und damit lag auch etwas unverständins in den teilnehmenden Nationen, die sich auch nicht so recht entschließen konnten, ob das alles so gerechtfertigt ist.
    Wäre das wirklich beabsichtigt gewesen, dass Ferdinand in Sarajevo umkommt, wäre der Krieg doch wohl direkt danach ausgebrochen.. oder?

  5. #25
    Avatar von port80

    Registriert seit
    30.06.2005
    Beiträge
    1.331
    Zitat Zitat von Ivo2
    Die Beteiligung von Crna Ruka ist zu 100% nachgewiesen. Einziges was nicht 100% nachgewiesen war, war die Verstrickung der serbischen Regierung bzw. des antisemtischen Prinzregent Aleksandar.
    Nach zu lesen in jedem Geschichtsbuch.

    Quote gekürzt weil sonst zu lang & unästhetisch / Gez.Schiptar

    Wenn du Probleme mit dem Englischen hast, your problem

    Darum geht es doch auch nur.....um die verstrickung der serbische Regierung.Euch muss doch auch klar sein wenn man von beweisse der Crna Ruka spricht, das es nur darum ging zu beweissen das die Serbische Regierung beteiligt war.

    Das alle auf das hinausläuft kann man gut sagen das Crna Ruka nicht bewiessen ist.

  6. #26
    Gast829627
    Zitat Zitat von port80
    Zitat Zitat von Ivo2
    Die Beteiligung von Crna Ruka ist zu 100% nachgewiesen. Einziges was nicht 100% nachgewiesen war, war die Verstrickung der serbischen Regierung bzw. des antisemtischen Prinzregent Aleksandar.
    Nach zu lesen in jedem Geschichtsbuch.

    Quote gekürzt weil sonst zu lang & unästhetisch / Gez.Schiptar

    Wenn du Probleme mit dem Englischen hast, your problem

    Darum geht es doch auch nur.....um die verstrickung der serbische Regierung.Euch muss doch auch klar sein wenn man von beweisse der Crna Ruka spricht, das es nur darum ging zu beweissen das die Serbische Regierung beteiligt war.

    Das alle auf das hinausläuft kann man gut sagen das Crna Ruka nicht bewiessen ist.
    das kannst du aber unserem alten herrn ivo nicht erklären ,den seine ignoranz wird nur noch durch seine sturheit übertroffen und das ist ne mischung wo nichts mehr zu machen ist 8)

  7. #27
    Avatar von Ivo2

    Registriert seit
    13.07.2004
    Beiträge
    19.007
    Zitat Zitat von Legija

    das kannst du aber unserem alten herrn ivo nicht erklären ,den seine ignoranz wird nur noch durch seine sturheit übertroffen und das ist ne mischung wo nichts mehr zu machen ist 8)
    Die Ignoranz liegt doch wohl eher bei dir. Nicht einmal ein serbischer Geschichtsverdreher wird dir jenen Blödsinn bestätigen, welchen du zu verzapfen imstande bist
    Es ist nun mal Fakt, dass die serbische Regierung und der Prinzregent ihre Felle davonschwimmen sahen, da ja Franz Ferdinand die Slawen als gleichberechtige Völker mit in's Boot nehmen wollte. Dies hätte den Traum von Nacrtanje abrupt zu einem Albtraum werden lassen.
    Frage: Wem hat das Attentat genutzt ?
    Antwort: Nur Serbien.

  8. #28
    Gast829627
    Zitat Zitat von Ivo2
    Zitat Zitat von Legija

    das kannst du aber unserem alten herrn ivo nicht erklären ,den seine ignoranz wird nur noch durch seine sturheit übertroffen und das ist ne mischung wo nichts mehr zu machen ist 8)
    Die Ignoranz liegt doch wohl eher bei dir. Nicht einmal ein serbischer Geschichtsverdreher wird dir jenen Blödsinn bestätigen, welchen du zu verzapfen imstande bist
    Es ist nun mal Fakt, dass die serbische Regierung und der Prinzregent ihre Felle davonschwimmen sahen, da ja Franz Ferdinand die Slawen als gleichberechtige Völker mit in's Boot nehmen wollte. Dies hätte den Traum von Nacrtanje abrupt zu einem Albtraum werden lassen.
    Frage: Wem hat das Attentat genutzt ?
    Antwort: Nur Serbien.

    8O :? 8O


    nur serbien?????





    tja wenn deutschland oder die KuK besser gekämpft hätten......dann hätten sie nen noch grösseren nutzen von gehabt 8)

  9. #29
    Avatar von KROPOTKiN

    Registriert seit
    08.12.2005
    Beiträge
    24
    Infos zum Kriegsausbruch 1914:
    http://www.balkanforum.at/modules.ph...ewtopic&t=6464

    Der Niedergang Jugoslawiens in wirtschaftlicher Hinsicht:

    Nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg wurde die jugoslawische Wirtschaft nach dem Vorbild der UdSSR sozialistisch umgestaltet. Durch den Bruch und dem Ausschluss aus dem kommunistischen Informationsbüro (COMECON) 1948 kam es zu einem Wirtschaftskrieg, der nur mit Hilfe des Westens abgeschwächt werden konnte.
    In der Folge wurde ein eigener jugoslawischen Sozialismus entwickelt – das Selbstverwaltungsmodell.
    Dieser Versuch verknüpfte gesellschaftliches Eigentum an den Produktionsmitteln mit den Marktmechanismen. Durch staatliche Eingriffe und Selbstverwaltungsabsprachen kam es zur Verzerrung der Preise und Verfälschung der Marktsignale, sodass das System nie ganz funktionierte.

    Durch die Verfassung von 1974, die die Republiken und autonomen Provinzen stärkte, kam es zu einem System aus acht Nationalökonomien (sechs Republiken und zwei autonome Provinzen).
    Gegen Ende der Ära Tito führten verschiedene Gründe zu einer wachsenden Destabilisierung der Wirtschaft, darunter das Ungleichgewicht zwischen einzelnen Wirtschaftssektoren, überzogene Einkommenspolitik, instabile Investitionspolitik der Banken und Unternehmen sowie die wachsenden Außenhandelsdefizite (z.B. Handelsbilanzdefizit 1979: 7,2 Mrd. Dollar).
    Die Krise bei den Banken wiederum hatte zwei Gründe. Erstens die „Selbstbedienungsmentalität“ der mit den Banken eng verwobenen Unternehmen, zweitens die wachsende Kreditaufnahme der Geschäftsbanken im Ausland und in Form von Devisenspareinlagen bei den Inländern.

    Die Wirtschaftskrise spitzte sich in den achtziger Jahren dramatisch zu. Die Inflation explodierte (1989: 1351 %), der Dollarkurs lag bei 118.160 Dinar. Dadurch erhöhte sich das Außenhandelsdefizit weiter, die Versorgung mit Devisen und Importwaren erschwerte sich.
    Die Produktion litt unter Versorgungs- und Absatzschwierigkeiten sowie mangelnder Arbeitsmotivation, die Produktion und die Investitionen gingen stetig zurück. Die offizielle Arbeitslosigkeit lag Ende der achtziger Jahre bei durchschnittlich 16,8 % (Slowenien 2,5 %, Kosovo 57,8 %). Zusätzlich wird eine versteckte Arbeitslosigkeit von ca. 1,4 Millionen Personen durch Überbeschäftigung angenommen.
    Der Reallohn ging innerhalb von acht Jahren um etwa ein Drittel zurück, was den Lebensstandard beträchtlich verschlechterte.

    Die Wirtschaft wurde durch die nationalen Gegensätze zusätzlich geschwächt. So blockierte am 29. Dezember 1987 die slowenische Führung die Beschlussfassung des Bundesbudgets für das kommende Jahr. Dies geschah erstmals seit dem Bestehen Jugoslawiens. Erst im Januar bzw. Februar wurde dann dieses mit Müh und Not unter Dach gebracht.
    Es gab Zusammenstöße zwischen den Kräften, die für gründliche wirtschaftliche Reformen waren und denen, die darauf bedacht waren, so viel wie möglich von der "vereinbarten" Wirtschaftspolitik (und die dabei erreichten Vorteile) beizubehalten.
    Die zwei wichtigsten wirtschaftlichen Ziele der jugoslawischen Bundesregierung für das Jahr 1989, das Beleben der wirtschaftlichen Aktivitäten und das Halten der Inflationsquote, wurden deshalb auch nicht erreicht.
    Da das politische Umfeld nicht geändert wurde und viele Reformen nicht oder stark abgeschwächt umgesetzt wurden, verstrich diese letzte Chance Jugoslawiens.

    Ende 1990 wurde die jugoslawische Nationalbank (NBJ) durch ein „Geheimgesetz“ offen entmachtet. Darin wurde die serbische Republiknotenbank ermächtigt, Kredite in Höhe von 1,8 Milliarden Dollar an die Republik Serbien zu gewähren. Den Banknotendruck übernahm ohne Wissen der NBJ die Bundesdruckerei. Das war für die Republiken Slowenien und Kroatien der Anstoß, eine eigene Währungspolitik zu starten.
    Damit ging dem Auseinanderbrechen des jugoslawischen Staates der Zerfall des Notenbanksystems voraus.

    Quellen:
    Raif Dizdarević, Od smrti Tita do smrti Jugoslavije – Svjedočenja 1981 – 1989, Sarajevo 2000.

    Giersch, Carsten, Konfliktregulierung in Jugoslawien 1991 – 1995: Die Rolle von OSZE, EU, UNO und NATO, Baden-Baden 1998.

    Hofbauer, Hannes, Balkankrieg: zehn Jahre Zerstörung Jugoslawiens, Wien 2001.

    Christoph Mülleder, Die Evaluierung der österreichischen Humanitären Hilfe im ehemaligen Jugoslawien als Ausgangspunkt für die Entwicklung eines einheitlichen Modells zur Erfassung und Dokumentation von Hilfsmaßnahmen (Schriften der Johannes-Kepler-Universität Linz. Reihe B – Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Band 30), Linz 1999.

  10. #30

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    11.391
    bestimmt jürgen eselfi..er....

Seite 3 von 4 ErsteErste 1234 LetzteLetzte

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Neuer Balkankrieg
    Von Overkill im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 18
    Letzter Beitrag: 22.05.2011, 14:25
  2. Balkankrieg
    Von CG_Lady im Forum Geschichte und Kultur
    Antworten: 30
    Letzter Beitrag: 18.03.2011, 20:51
  3. Balkankrieg 1912/13
    Von Ivo2 im Forum Geschichte und Kultur
    Antworten: 61
    Letzter Beitrag: 21.11.2007, 01:06
  4. Balkankrieg
    Von deni im Forum Rakija
    Antworten: 8
    Letzter Beitrag: 19.06.2006, 14:05