BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 2 von 7 ErsteErste 123456 ... LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 11 bis 20 von 65

Bosna i Hercegovina voller Musik, Witz, Lust, Lebenslust

Erstellt von Kada, 29.07.2009, 17:11 Uhr · 64 Antworten · 14.408 Aufrufe

  1. #11

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    Fildzan, Bosnian coffee pot



  2. #12

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    Art Collection in the Bosnian Institute ( Bošnjački institut ) or Foundation of the late Adil Zulfikarpašić. Sarajevo.





  3. #13

    Registriert seit
    27.07.2009
    Beiträge
    202
    Zitat Zitat von Kada Beitrag anzeigen
    GerechterMensch das stimmt doppelt nicht:

    1. BiH hat einen einzigen Teil

    2. Überall sind diese Dinge zu sehen, du scheinst wenig über unser Land zu wissen, folge diesem Thread aufmerksam und das wird sich ändern.
    Ich weis ne menge über BiH, ich wahr in Sarajevo und tuzla

    bosnien hat die bessten filme in ex-jugo gehabt,

    aber orginal Bosnische Titten kannst du nicht in BiH sehn, weil die muslims sind, die Titten die man in Bosnien sieht sind Kroatisch oder Serbisch, das meinte ich. aber einen serbischen teil bosniens gibts doch die Republica srbska.

  4. #14

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    Bosnjacki Institut : Bosnian Room





  5. #15

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    es gibt sehr viele bosniakinische titten zu sehen. @ gerechtermensch

    wie sich eine frau kleidet bestimmt in bih nicht die ethnität

  6. #16

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    Esskultur; Cevabzinice



  7. #17

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    Bosnian Culture



    Bosnia and Herzegovina is one of the most diverse countries in former Yugoslavia, and you will feel this almost immediately when you visit. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, three groups make up the greatest percentage of the population: the Bosnians, Croats, and the Serbs. You can also find Jews, Romanian, Albanians, and Turks in Bosnia and Herzegovina. With this rich blend of culture and beliefs, you’ll feel steeped in a very old and complex way of life. Enjoy it!

    Home Life in Bosnian Culture
    In the countryside in Bosnia and Herzegovina, families usually live in houses of brick, stone, or wood. Countryside homes were traditionally zadrugas, which were made up of several families living on a common land. Families shared the farming responsibilities to lighten the workload of farming a great deal. Today, you will still find a great community atmosphere in small villages and suburban city regions alike.
    Many Bosnians are Muslims, and if you plan home visits during your travels, keep in mind that removing your shoes is regular practice in Muslim households. Slippers are generally provided by the host when you visit Bosnian homes.
    Family Life in Bosnian Culture
    Elders are respected in Bosnian culture and are considered extremely important members of the family. Their opinions and wishes are always handled with the utmost care.
    In fact, family life in general may seem more formal, including the relationship between parents and children. Bosnian culture still maintains extended family groups, which means that the grandparents live with their adult children and care for the children while the parents are at work. Godparenting is commonly practiced, and all children are raised with values respecting their older relatives and knowing that they will most likely care for older relatives later on.
    Families were affected by the war in the 1990s, which visitors should keep in mind. Some families have been broken up and are now headed by widows after husbands were lost to the conflict. In addition, different areas reached a higher concentration during the war. More people moved into cities from the countryside, where they remain today. Suburban areas became much more heavily populated in the mid-1990s, adding even more personality to these already diverse areas.
    Women and Marriage in Bosnian Culture
    Women usually work outside of their homes in cities and large towns. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, women have equal political and economic rights. In many families, women may be more responsible for household tasks like food shopping, household chores, and childcare, particularly in more rural Bosnian regions.
    Food in Bosnian Culture
    You’ll find that no matter which cuisine you choose to sample, it most likely combines delicious roasted meats, stewed vegetables, and bread in a bevy of combination. Have a traditional Bosnian stew of cabbage and meat, and burek and pida, which are layered meat and cheese pies. Try baklava, a Turkish sweet, to finish off your meal.
    Bosnian Culture Tourist Tips
    *In Bosnia and Herzegovina, tipping in bars and restaurants is expected. In smaller restaurants, it’s not customary but is always appreciated. Aim for 5-10% of the total.
    *Use caution when discussing politics. While many Bosnians are both friendly and enthusiastic to talk about any subject, it’s recommended that you listen to political opinions and not necessarily voice yours.

  8. #18

    Registriert seit
    27.07.2009
    Beiträge
    202
    Zitat Zitat von Kada Beitrag anzeigen
    Fildzan, Bosnian coffee pot


    Das ist aber eindeutig türkisch, allein der name Fildzan und bardak

  9. #19

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    Food in Bosnia and Herzegovina




    When you travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina, be sure that you enjoy traditional dishes. Food in Bosnia and Herzegovina puts a spin on Balkan entrees and has a little something for every traveler, whether you love a good steak or you’re strictly veggie.
    Appetizers
    Bosnian food can be rich, but not in an unhealthy or unappetizing way. Fresh ingredients and whole foods make meals from Bosnia and Herzegovina totally appealing.
    Start your day with a simple breakfast. The usual morning meal is a kwizija, or hearty meal. Stock up on a variety of small courses that include scrambled eggs and bread with a spread like jam, butter, and honey. Drink a strong, traditional coffee with a dash sweet sugar, or a cup of black tea. The feature of the breakfast is a soft white cheese straight from the farms in Bosnia and Herzegovina’s countryside.
    Entrees
    If you like meat and potato courses, you’ll be thrilled with the options you will find for entree selections in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Lunch is generally the largest meal of the day, so find the most intriguing restaurant in town and indulge!
    Try dishes like the Bosnian bosanki lonac, a slow-roasted pot of meat and vegetables, or japrak, made up of cabbage rolls stuffed with a savory filling. If you are traveling in Mostar, try the trout, which is a specialty to the area. A buttery, flaky texture awaits, and is one option for someone who loves fish.
    Dinner in Bosnia and Herzegovina is generally light. You’ll probably have it after 8:00 p.m., and for Americans and the British, this may seem quite late. Pack a snack of some Bosnian sweets to tide you over, like a tiny square of baklava, normally reserved for special occasions amongst Bosnians.
    If you take advantage of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s surprisingly lively nightlife, try the Bosnian fast food called when you’re out late. This food may be fast but is actually quite traditional, dating back nearly 400 years! Your Bosnian cevaps, as they are nicknamed, will be made up of small sausages and chopped onions, folded in a pita bread called somun.
    Drinks
    Locally-produced wines and brandies spoil any connoisseur for choice. Sample the rakija, which is available in lots of fruit flavors like plum and grape.
    Desserts
    Besides the famous baklava, desserts often have fresh fruit and cream as main ingredients. Try the tufahijia, which is a delicious dessert dish made from apples filled with walnuts, and then topped with a rich layer of whipped cream. If you are partial to pudding, have the krempita, with a creamy, soft flavor similar to cheesecake. If you have room, you’ll want to try this delicious Bosnian food.
    What makes Bosnian food even better is the overwhelming sense of hospitality and warmth. You’ll be offered cookies, cakes, sweets, coffee, meat platters, and cheese samplers, and once you start sampling, you won’t be able to stop. Just be sure to save room for the main course!

  10. #20

    Registriert seit
    28.06.2009
    Beiträge
    2.278
    Zitat Zitat von GerechterMensch Beitrag anzeigen
    Das ist aber eindeutig türkisch, allein der name Fildzan und bardak

    Selbstverständlich ist es das.

Seite 2 von 7 ErsteErste 123456 ... LetzteLetzte

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Hellas voller Musik, Witz, Lust, Lebenslust
    Von Amphion im Forum Geschichte und Kultur
    Antworten: 2166
    Letzter Beitrag: 11.12.2017, 15:57
  2. Divic (Bosna i Hercegovina)
    Von BOS4N4C im Forum Balkan-Städte
    Antworten: 19
    Letzter Beitrag: 11.04.2010, 23:15
  3. Una - Bosna i Hercegovina
    Von bosmix im Forum Landschaft, Tier- und Pflanzenwelt
    Antworten: 6
    Letzter Beitrag: 30.07.2009, 19:28
  4. Bosna i Hercegovina
    Von denki im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 92
    Letzter Beitrag: 16.07.2007, 18:54
  5. Bosna i Hercegovina - Bilder
    Von Dobojlija im Forum Landschaft, Tier- und Pflanzenwelt
    Antworten: 178
    Letzter Beitrag: 03.10.2006, 11:31