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Cetnici-Tschetniks

Erstellt von MIC SOKOLI, 04.02.2005, 14:28 Uhr · 973 Antworten · 52.126 Aufrufe

  1. #351

    Registriert seit
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    Zitat Zitat von Schiptar
    Richtig. Hat man ihn dazu gezwungen? Warum verehren serbische Nazis ihn heute anscheinend immer noch?
    kwele

  2. #352
    Avatar von Schiptar

    Registriert seit
    30.04.2005
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    14.116
    Zitat Zitat von LaLa
    Weil es Nazis sind. Aber Nazis verehren Nedic und nicht Draza
    Ich denke mal, die finden beide gut.

    Zitat Zitat von Karadjordje
    Zitat Zitat von Schiptar
    Richtig. Hat man ihn dazu gezwungen? Warum verehren serbische Nazis ihn heute anscheinend immer noch?
    kwele
    :arrow: Metkovics Photoalbum ein paar Seiten weiter vorne, wo u.a. Ian Stuart Donaldson und alle möglichen alten Nazigrößen geehrt werden, z.B. Nedic beim Hitler-Besuch auf dem Obersalzberg.

  3. #353

    Registriert seit
    11.12.2004
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    1.484
    keine bilder

  4. #354

    Registriert seit
    18.07.2004
    Beiträge
    9.182
    Bilder sind Interpretierbar, Gestellt und Manipulierbar.

  5. #355

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    965
    Zitat Zitat von Schiptar
    Was die beiden verblödetsten und rechtesten US-Präsidenten des 20. Jh. vor Bush 2 über einen jugoslawischen Kriegsherrn gesagt haben, kann man den Hasen füttern. (Gerade Nixon konnte man seit Watergate eh nicht mal mehr die Uhrzeit glauben.)
    Welchen Aussagewert hat so was? Gar keinen.

    Darauf wollte ich hinaus

  6. #356
    Gast829627
    damit wir zum punkt wieder kommen die cetniks hatten nicht nur coole typen.....

    aber überwiegend waren sie helden........... 8) 8)

  7. #357
    Gast829627
    Zitat Zitat von Yugo4ever
    Zitat Zitat von Schiptar
    Was die beiden verblödetsten und rechtesten US-Präsidenten des 20. Jh. vor Bush 2 über einen jugoslawischen Kriegsherrn gesagt haben, kann man den Hasen füttern. (Gerade Nixon konnte man seit Watergate eh nicht mal mehr die Uhrzeit glauben.)
    Welchen Aussagewert hat so was? Gar keinen.

    Darauf wollte ich hinaus

    ja ne ist klar darauf wolltest DU hinaus....

  8. #358

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    US-militärische Infos zu den serbischen Cetnici



    "... It was the Serbs' violent protest to Regent Paul's accord with Hitler and their overthrow of the government in March 1941 that precipitated the German attack the following month, and it was from among the Serbs that the Chetniks rose to resist the occupation forces.

    ... Mihailovitch called his irregulars "Chetniks," from the title of fl Serb nationalist organization that had resisted the Turks, fought well in World War I, and since existed as a reserve force to be called up when needed. Costa Pecanatch, the aging World War I leader, went over to the Neditch government at the outset of the occupation, leaving Mihailovitch with those remnants willing to resist the occupation forces and collaborationists. The Mihailovitch movement quickly gained momentum during the early summer of 1941, and liaison was established with the government-in-exile of King, Peter. A short time later Mihailovitch was first named commander of the resistance forces within Yugoslavia, and then minister of defense of the royal government-in-exile.

    Chetnik policy called for the organization of strong underground forces in Serbia for the day when they might rise in conjunction with Allied landings on the Balkan Peninsula. Mihailovitch, himself, had been appalled by the execution of some 35,000 Serb hostages for Chetnik activities in World War I, and was determined to avoid repetition of any such reprisals for a premature rising of the forces under his command. Thus, Chetnik operations were generally restricted to small-scale actions and sabotage.

    ... The antiroyalist policy of the Partisans and anti-Communist attitude of the Chetniks soon led to a fratricidal conflict between the two, a cleavage the Germans were quick to turn to their own advantage. Whereas the Chetniks comprised mostly local units to be called up as needed, the Partisans had a great number of large and active mobile units capable of moving about the country and not tied down to any particular locality. As a consequence, the Partisans were not as hesitant as the Chetniks to engage in operations for which the occupying forces would exact severe reprisals, a development that incurred further the enmity of the Chetniks. A conflict within a conflict soon developed, with one Yugoslav force attacking the other while that force was already engaged against occupation troops.

    In some cases the Partisans were given credit for Chetnik attacks against the occupation forces and their auxiliaries; on the other hand, the Chetniks were credited with successful Partisan forays. To complicate matters further, there were also guerrilla bands operating under no other authority than their own. Thus, German references to Partisans did not necessarily mean the forces of Tito, but rather the Yugoslav resistance forces in general, regardless of political sympathies. As well as the European Axis came to know them, it could not always distinguish one group from the other, and came to use the word Partisan in its broadest sense.

    The most important guerrilla operation in 1941 took place against the Italians in Montenegro. Ruggedly independent, the Montenegrins on 13 July swarmed down in well-coordinated attacks on the Italian garrisons scattered throughout their mountain state. Taken by surprise, the occupation forces were destroyed or thrown back on their major garrison towns and communications centers. Returning with strong ground, naval, and air forces, the Italians required almost a year to put down the rising, and managed to accomplish it only by enlisting the aid of the Chetniks. Stipulations in the agreement with local Chetnik leaders required the Italians to restrict themselves to the garrison towns and main communication and transportation lines. In turn, the Chetniks maintained control over the countryside and kept it free of Partisans, drawing on Italian stocks for arms and ammunition.

    ... The Chetnik organization was based on a "brigade" of two combat companies and a replacement company. Three to eight brigades formed a corps, subordinate to an area headquarters responsible to Mihailovitch, at approximately army level. As Yugoslav Minister of Defense, Mihailovitch was a member of the Yugoslav Government-in-Exile and responsible to the Prime Minister and King Peter.

    ... The Chetniks became a matter of sharp contention between German and Italian commanders during the course of Operation WEISS. In fact, the Italians had been requested to disarm their Chetnik auxiliaries as part of WEISS III. However, regarded as allies by the Italians, many Chetnik units were supplied with arms and ammunition and given important missions in the conduct of operations.

    Since repeated requests to disarm these Chetniks were met with evasion, local German commanders were instructed to disarm and detain as prisoners any Chetniks encountered in their areas of responsibility. Strong German protests to Mussolini finally had the desired effect, and the Italian field commanders were directed to cease delivery of arms and munitions to the Chetniks and to disarm them as soon as the Partisans had been destroyed.

    ... Large concentrations of Chetniks, including those supported by the Italians, formed a constant threat to German forces in the event of an Allied landing, and the Commander-Chief, Southeast, directed that Operation SCHWARZ, under the Commander of Troops in Croatia, be undertaken in May and June to destroy the Chetniks in Herzegovina and Montenegro.

    ... Achieving surprise, the German forces inflicted heavy casualties on the Chetniks, capturing their commander in Montenegro, Major Djurisic, with 4,000 men, and forcing Mihailovitch to flee back into Serbia with the battered remnants of his command. three months of the year, 985 incidents were reported, including sabotage, attacks on native officials and police, and attacks on small German and Bulgarian troop units and installations. In a particularly unenviable position were the local officials, forced to remain in office by the Germans and regarded as collaborators by both Chetniks and Partisans. Fifty-eight were murdered during the first quarter of 1943, and 197 town halls were burned or damaged. In reprisal, in addition to burning some villages and levying fines in livestock, the occupation authorities ordered the shooting of several hundred hostages from among those arrested on suspicion of being members or supporters of the Chetnik and Partisan movements. These ruthless measures had the desired effect for a time, but could not prevent the regrouping of both Chetniks and Partisans as soon as the thinly spread German or Bulgarian forces had left a particular area.

    ... As of the end of June, the Germans had a total of three Bulgarian, one Italian, and 12 of their own divisions scattered throughout those areas of the Balkans under nominal German control. ... A number of small-scale operations were carried out against both Partisans and Chetniks throughout Yugoslavia during this period. In contrast to large-scale operations, these had the advantage of making easier the security of preparations and the achieving of surprise, and succeeded in keeping the irregulars constant!, on the move. However, they had the disadvantage of allowing individual Partisans and Chetniks to slip through repeated encirclements and escape into areas recently combed by other units or where the occupation troops were not so active at the moment. ..."

    Quelle: http://www.army.mil/cmh/books/wwii/a.../AG-BALKAN.HTM

  9. #359

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    11.12.2004
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    Na ihr Ustaschoiden, Islamofaschistischen Geschichtsfälscher, frustriert?

  10. #360

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    Seht ihr die Deutschen haben sich mit den Cedos getroffen da diese Waffen von den Italienern bekommen hatten. Den Deutschen ging es um eine schnelle Entwaffnung der Cedos, aufgrund der Gefahr einer alliierten Invasion, denn dann würden die Cedos Angriffe gegen die deutschen Okkupanten starten.


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