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Film dokumentar mbi Arvanitet

Erstellt von IbishKajtazi, 12.04.2010, 19:56 Uhr · 138 Antworten · 9.018 Aufrufe

  1. #51
    ardi-
    Zitat Zitat von Arvanitis Beitrag anzeigen
    Ethnologia Balkanica - Google Bücher

    The name Arvanites and its equivalents go back to an old ethnonym that used in Greek to refer to Albanians.[21][22] It originally referred to the inhabitants of that region Arvanon (Άρβανον) or Arvana (Άρβανα),[23] and then to all Albanian-speakers. In Albanian language the self-designation Arbëror, which is still in use by Arvanites and Arbëreshë of Italy, had been exchanged for the new name Shqiptarë since the 17th century, an innovation thatwas not shared by the Albanophone migrant communities in the south of Greece.
    das heisst überhaupt nichts...

  2. #52
    Arvanitis
    Zitat Zitat von ardi- Beitrag anzeigen
    das heisst überhaupt nichts...
    Für Feldforscher und Historiker schon.

  3. #53
    ardi-
    Zitat Zitat von Arvanitis Beitrag anzeigen
    Für Feldforscher und Historiker schon.
    aha, durch diese umbennenung haben sich die völker getrennt?

  4. #54
    Arvanitis
    Zitat Zitat von ardi- Beitrag anzeigen
    aha, durch diese umbennenung haben sich die völker getrennt?
    Das eine führt zum anderen.

    Arvanites in Greece originated from Albanian settlers who moved south at different times between the 11th and 16th century from areas in what is today southern Albania.[3][4] The reasons for this migration are not entirely clear and may be manifold. In many instances the Arvanites were invited by the Byzantine and Latin rulers of the time. They were employed to re-settle areas that had been largely depopulated through wars, epidemics, and other reasons, and they were employed as soldiers. Some later movements are also believed to have been motivated to evade Islamization after the Ottoman conquest. The main waves of migration into southern Greece started around 1300, reached a peak some time during the 14th century, and ended around 1600.[5] Arvanites first reached Thessaly, then Attica, and finally the Peloponnese.[6]
    In areas such as Mesogeia, many Arvanitika-speaking populations did not see language as the defining criterion of their Greek identity. Their sense of identity relied upon their adherence to the Greek Orthodox Church, their sense of localism with ties to the land, and their sense of kinship. All of these attributes had long served as cohesive elements of identity within the Ottoman Empire, which provided the Arvanites the ability to establish a form of ethnic unity and a stronger form of Greek self-identification.[7] Throughout the Ottoman period, the Arvanites always maintained their ethnic Greek identity,[8] as well as their loyalty to the Greek Orthodox Church during their conflicts against the Ottomans[9].
    During the Greek War of Independence, many Arvanites played an important role fighting on the Greek side against the Ottomans, often as national Greek heroes. With the formation of modern nations and nation-states in the Balkans, Arvanites have come to be regarded as an integral part of the Greek nation. In 1899, leading representatives of the Arvanites in Greece, among them descendants of the independence heroes, published a manifesto calling their fellow Albanians outside Greece to join in the creation of a common Albanian-Greek state.[10] In 1903, Arvanites like Vangelis Koropoulis from Mandra, Attica, participated in the Macedonian Struggle.[11]
    During the 20th century, after the creation of the Albanian nation-state, Arvanites in Greece have come to dissociate themselves much more strongly from the Albanians, stressing instead their national self-identification as Greeks. They are reported to resent being called Albanians.[12] At the same time, it has been suggested that many Arvanites in earlier decades maintained an assimilatory stance,[13] leading to a progressive loss of their traditional language and a shifting of the younger generation towards Greek. At some times, particularly under the nationalist 4th of August Regime under Ioannis Metaxas of 1936–1941, Greek state institutions followed a policy of actively discouraging and repressing the use of Arvanitika.[14] In the decades following World War II and the Greek Civil War, many Arvanites came under pressure to abandon Arvanitika in favour of monolingualism in the national language, and especially the archaizing Katharevousa which remained the official variant of Greek until 1976. This trend was prevalent mostly during the Greek military junta of 1967–1974.[15

  5. #55
    ardi-
    Zitat Zitat von Arvanitis Beitrag anzeigen
    Das eine führt zum anderen.

    Arvanites in Greece originated from Albanian settlers who moved south at different times between the 11th and 16th century from areas in what is today southern Albania.[3][4] The reasons for this migration are not entirely clear and may be manifold. In many instances the Arvanites were invited by the Byzantine and Latin rulers of the time. They were employed to re-settle areas that had been largely depopulated through wars, epidemics, and other reasons, and they were employed as soldiers. Some later movements are also believed to have been motivated to evade Islamization after the Ottoman conquest. The main waves of migration into southern Greece started around 1300, reached a peak some time during the 14th century, and ended around 1600.[5] Arvanites first reached Thessaly, then Attica, and finally the Peloponnese.[6]
    In areas such as Mesogeia, many Arvanitika-speaking populations did not see language as the defining criterion of their Greek identity. Their sense of identity relied upon their adherence to the Greek Orthodox Church, their sense of localism with ties to the land, and their sense of kinship. All of these attributes had long served as cohesive elements of identity within the Ottoman Empire, which provided the Arvanites the ability to establish a form of ethnic unity and a stronger form of Greek self-identification.[7] Throughout the Ottoman period, the Arvanites always maintained their ethnic Greek identity,[8] as well as their loyalty to the Greek Orthodox Church during their conflicts against the Ottomans[9].
    During the Greek War of Independence, many Arvanites played an important role fighting on the Greek side against the Ottomans, often as national Greek heroes. With the formation of modern nations and nation-states in the Balkans, Arvanites have come to be regarded as an integral part of the Greek nation. In 1899, leading representatives of the Arvanites in Greece, among them descendants of the independence heroes, published a manifesto calling their fellow Albanians outside Greece to join in the creation of a common Albanian-Greek state.[10] In 1903, Arvanites like Vangelis Koropoulis from Mandra, Attica, participated in the Macedonian Struggle.[11]
    During the 20th century, after the creation of the Albanian nation-state, Arvanites in Greece have come to dissociate themselves much more strongly from the Albanians, stressing instead their national self-identification as Greeks. They are reported to resent being called Albanians.[12] At the same time, it has been suggested that many Arvanites in earlier decades maintained an assimilatory stance,[13] leading to a progressive loss of their traditional language and a shifting of the younger generation towards Greek. At some times, particularly under the nationalist 4th of August Regime under Ioannis Metaxas of 1936–1941, Greek state institutions followed a policy of actively discouraging and repressing the use of Arvanitika.[14] In the decades following World War II and the Greek Civil War, many Arvanites came under pressure to abandon Arvanitika in favour of monolingualism in the national language, and especially the archaizing Katharevousa which remained the official variant of Greek until 1976. This trend was prevalent mostly during the Greek military junta of 1967–1974.[15
    also ich weiss ja nicht um was wir genau streiten

    du kannst nicht leugnen, dass wir ein volk sind. Und langsam wissen auch wir, dass ihr lieber "neu griechen" seid als albaner.

  6. #56
    Arvanitis
    Zitat Zitat von ardi- Beitrag anzeigen
    also ich weiss ja nicht um was wir genau streiten
    Ihr stellt mir Fragen und ich gebe euch aufschlussreiche Antworten.

    Zitat Zitat von ardi- Beitrag anzeigen
    du kannst nicht leugnen, dass wir ein volk sind. Und langsam wissen auch wir, dass ihr lieber "neu griechen" seid als albaner.
    Kommt drauf an wie man Volk definiert. Ethnisch gesehen ja. Ansonsten sind wir weder ein Staatsvolk noch ein geschichtliches Volk.

  7. #57
    ardi-
    Zitat Zitat von Arvanitis Beitrag anzeigen
    Ihr stellt mir Fragen und ich gebe euch aufschlussreiche Antworten.



    Kommt drauf an wie man Volk definiert. Ethnisch gesehen ja. Ansonsten sind wir weder ein Staatsvolk noch ein geschichtliches Volk.
    ok

    eben, staatsvolk wissen wir

    Geschichtlich???

    dann kann man jede region, als ein nicht geschichtliches volk mit dem rest des landes bezeichnen...
    genauso könntest du dann auch behaupten, das wir katholiken kein geschichtliches volk mit dem moslems sind

    aber das stimmt nicht, die region, bzw. die verschiedenen unterteilungen machen das volk aus
    der albaner schreibt albanische geschichte....
    weil ein albaner diese taten macht/machte...

    wenn ich falsch liegen, so verbessere mich

  8. #58
    Arvanitis
    Zitat Zitat von ardi- Beitrag anzeigen
    der albaner schreibt albanische geschichte....
    Richtig und der Arvanite schreibt griechische Geschichte.

  9. #59

    Registriert seit
    11.04.2010
    Beiträge
    114
    Arvaniten sind vergriechte Albaner, die mit der Zeit die Sprache inzwischen verloren haben. (Mit der Sprache ist albanisch gemeint)
    Und wenn du @Arvanitis wirklich ein Arvanite bist dann hast du vor Jahren
    albanische Daddys gehabt.

    Grüße aus Drenica!

  10. #60
    Arvanitis
    Zitat Zitat von -DRENICAK- Beitrag anzeigen
    Arvaniten sind vergriechte Albaner, die mit der Zeit die Sprache inzwischen verloren haben. (Mit der Sprache ist albanisch gemeint)
    Und wenn du @Arvanitis wirklich ein Arvanite bist dann hast du vor Jahren
    albanische Daddys gehabt.

    Grüße aus Drenica!
    Ne mein Vater ist griechischer Staatsbürger, genauso wie mein Opa, mein Urgroßopa, mein Ururgroßopa, mein Urururgroßopa usw.
    In meinem Stammbaum war keiner albanischer Staatsbürger.

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