BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 76 von 78 ErsteErste ... 266672737475767778 LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 751 bis 760 von 776

IMRO (Innere Mazedonische Revolutionäre Organisation)

Erstellt von Metho, 24.01.2014, 17:37 Uhr · 775 Antworten · 28.656 Aufrufe

  1. #751
    Avatar von Singidun

    Registriert seit
    05.07.2009
    Beiträge
    10.113
    Goce Delceva ulica in Belgrad, gerade bei mir um die Ecke, hatte mich als Kind immer gefragt wer das sein soll ^^

  2. #752
    Avatar von Albokings24

    Registriert seit
    08.05.2012
    Beiträge
    6.159
    Zitat Zitat von Singidunum Beitrag anzeigen
    Goce Delceva ulica in Belgrad, gerade bei mir um die Ecke, hatte mich als Kind immer gefragt wer das sein soll ^^
    Bei uns in Kumanova gabs früher eine Goce Delcev Strasse, diese wurde aber unbennant in Adem Jashari Strasse.

    Das war noch ein Revolutionär.

  3. #753
    Avatar von Makedonec do Koska

    Registriert seit
    28.04.2012
    Beiträge
    4.896
    Zitat Zitat von Singidunum Beitrag anzeigen
    Goce Delceva ulica in Belgrad, gerade bei mir um die Ecke, hatte mich als Kind immer gefragt wer das sein soll ^^

    Ui, wusste gar nicht dass selbst die Serben eine Straße nach dem großen makedonischen Revolutionär benannt haben

  4. #754
    Avatar von Metho

    Registriert seit
    01.08.2013
    Beiträge
    6.199
    IMRO: Struggle For Independence Of Macedonia

    VMRO: Vnatresna Makedonska Revolucionerna Organizacija

    At the heart of the great Macedonian uprisings, which laid the foundations of the movement for national liberation, was the struggle of the Macedonian people to create a separate and independent state. In its program, VMRO (IMRO: Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization) defined the foundations of the future Macedonian state, and, in the course of the war for liberation, created political forms of authority. This authority, which existed on the territory over which the Organization had political power, organized a movement for national liberation and can be called a de facto authority. To create a new Macedonian state, VMRO started from the idea that Macedonia would thus be spared the aggressive politics of the neighboring Balkan states, and the continuing development of the idea of national liberation would be ensured. In the attempt to realize its programmatic goals, TMORO tried to give Macedonia the standing of a new state, explaining to Balkan and European governments that only thus could the peaceful co-existence of the Balkan peoples, and peace in general, be guaranteed. In appeals, memoranda, declarations sent to Balkan and European governments giving historical and scientific arguments, VMRO insisted on the need for Macedonia to constitute a new state in the Balkans, pointing out that the Macedonian people, like other free peoples, has the right to self-determination within its own state.
    In the period following the Ilinden Uprising, VMRO survived, despite the severe reprisals carried out by theOttoman authorities. In the first months of 1904, VMRO supervised the laying of wide ideological and political foundations for the building of Macedonian statehood, preserving at the same time the independence of the movement for national liberation.
    In the new conditions following the Ilinden Uprising, the idea of Macedonian statehood was revealed in the conviction that "the masses (the Macedonian people) should not rely on the possibility that Bulgaria or any other country might come and liberate them ". At the same time the future of Macedonia w defined as that of a state with independent status within a Balkan federation. These assumptions were also founded on the condemnation of attempts by Balkan States to divide Macedonia into spheres of interest and influence, and to partition its territory. The programmatic documents of VMRO, agreed on at the General Congress held in the Rila Monastery in 1905, contain the ideological, political and statutory grounds for the establishment of a new, de facto, Macedonian state. That is to say, it was agreed, as the basic premise, that, under the existing conditions of foreign sovereignty over the state, the Organization should constitute its organs and institutions as a state within a state. The kernel of the future Macedonian state was still the local revolutionary committees of VMRO (both in the villages and in the towns), but it was necessary that they develop and hold authority in local self-government . The Constitution of the Organization separated the existing legal commissions from the local revolutionary committees, as independent for the hearing of court cases brought by the population. In drawing up regulations for the state, the Organization assigned concrete functions to its political organs for the exercise of authority. Thus, the General Congress constituted itself as the leading legal body, with the right to pass binding regulations and legal acts valid throughout the territory. It was declared the court of last resort with the right to grant pardons and amnesties. At the same time, a number of principles of judicial procedure were defined. It was pointed out that, in the course of their work, the courts should be guided by a revolutionary consciousness, local common law, scrupulousness, equity and agreement between litigants. After the revolution of the Young Turks, the idea of a Macedonian state was also incorporated into the program of the newly-created People's Federal Party . This states that the structure of Turkey as such should be founded on the principles of recognition of a people's sovereignty, consolidation of the parliamentary system, election by the people of a government responsible to the people, and recognition of universal, proportional, secret and direct suffrage.


    The idea of a Macedonian polity and state demanded that equality of nations and minorities be established and that privileges based on nation, class, station and religion be abolished. In insisting on the democratization of social and political life and on a constitutional and parliamentary system, the separation of church and state was sought. Thus, religious and educational matters should be in the hands of religious and educational institutions, under the supervision of elected representatives of the Macedonian people.
    At this stage, there was a modification of the thesis of an independent Macedonian state within a Balkan federation. In the new situation created by the introduction of the parliamentary system, four Macedonians were elected to the Turkish Parliament, and a concept of state and judiciary was built on the legal premise that Turkey should be reorganized as self- governing territorial units, beginning with recognition of a federal structure. On the basis of this concept the Organization believed that Macedonia would acquire the status of a federal unit, and, as such, would have precisely defined responsibilities and authority, as would the central organs, i.e. the organs of the federation.
    However, the establishment of a constitutional system in Turkey and changes in constitutional law did not bring about any change in the position of Macedonia.
    The further development of the idea of a Macedonian state was tied to the events which occurred after the declaration of the Balkan War against Turkey and the Second Balkan War between the allies, and continued up to the end of the First World War and the conclusion of the Treaty of Versailles, when the partition of Macedonia was confirmed.
    At this stage in the development of the idea of a Macedonian state, different groups and individuals came forward with various programs, views and attitudes, all expressing the vital interests of the nation. Most prominent among them were the Macedonian colony in St. Petersburg, Russia, led by Dimitrija Čupovski, the Association of Macedonian Students in Switzerland, the temporary office of VMRO in Sofia, and the group of Macedonian Autonomists in Serbia led by Grigorie Hadzhitaškovič.
    All these representatives of the Macedonian people shared the idea of preserving the territorial integrity of Macedonia. Fighting against its partition, they appealed in their programmatic declarations to the international community to recognize the right of Macedonians to self-determination and the creation of their own state. They insisted that the Macedonian state should become a federal unit within a Balkan federation, and provided a political and legal conception for the proposed federation.
    The autonomy, i.e. the independence, of Macedonia is viewed within the framework of a Balkan federation. The independent existence of Macedonia requires the elimination and extinction of the rivalry between Balkan states over the partition of Macedonia. According to the proponents of this idea, if the existence of one Balkan state excludes the existence of another, this brings about discord and strife between the Balkan peoples. They point out that the Pan-Hellenic idea excludes the idea of a Greater Bulgaria, and each excludes the idea of a Greater Serbia.
    In order to eradicate the origins of discord, the proponents of this idea put their faith in a federal Balkan state consisting of an Balkan peoples, which would be able to ensure peaceful co-existence and progress.
    Such a constitutional position for Macedonia would enable Macedonia to serve as a unifying link between the Balkan states. In this way they would meet, not with weapons in their hands, but otherwise, and thus Macedonia would contribute to the founding of a Balkan confederation.

  5. #755
    Avatar von Metho

    Registriert seit
    01.08.2013
    Beiträge
    6.199
    Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization (IMRO), Macedonian Vatreshna Makedonska-Revolutsionerna Organizatsiya(VMRO), Bulgarian Vŭtreshnata Makedono-Odrinska Revolutsionna Organizatsiya (VMRO), secret revolutionary society that was active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its many incarnations struggled with two contradictory goals: establishing Macedonia as an autonomous state on the one hand and promoting Bulgarian political interests on the other.
    IMRO was founded in 1893 in Thessaloníki; its early leaders included Damyan Gruev, Gotsé Delchev, and Yane Sandanski, men who had a Macedonian regional identity and a Bulgarian national identity. Their goal was to win autonomy for a large portion of the geographical region of Macedonia from itsOttoman Turkish rulers. In 1903, having gained substantial support among the Slav Christian populations of Macedonia, IMRO staged the Ilinden Uprising, a significant but unsuccessful rebellion that was rapidly suppressed by the Ottoman authorities. Subsequently IMRO split into two separate factions: a leftist, pro-Macedonian wing based in Macedonia, which continued to advocate for an independent Macedonia, and a rightist, pro-Bulgarian wing (referred to as the Supremacist or Vrhovist wing) based in Sofia, which sought to annex Macedonia to Bulgaria and promoted Bulgarian political and military interests more generally. For the next few decades, the rightist wing engaged in a campaign of terror and assassination against its opponents.
    During the Balkan Wars of 1912–13 (when the region of Macedonia was divided among Serbia,Greece, and Bulgaria) and World War I, which followed, IMRO’s increasingly indiscriminate use of terror alienated both its Macedonian and its Bulgarian supporters. The rightist, pro-Bulgarian wing of IMRO under Todor Aleksandrov assassinated Bulgaria’s prime minister, Aleksandŭr Stamboliyski, in 1923. The next year Aleksandrov himself was assassinated, at which time Alexander Protogerov assumed control of the organization, only to be displaced by Ivan Mihailov. The Mihailovists, as they were known, continued to identify closely with Bulgaria and to support Bulgarian irredentism. They had close ties to diaspora organizations abroad, the most important of which was the Macedonian Political Organization in the United States and Canada. When a new Bulgarian government came to power in 1934, it outlawed IMRO and arrested or expelled its leaders.
    The leftist, pro-Macedonian wing of IMRO, which coalesced in 1925 as IMRO (United), continued to promote the cause of Macedonian nationalism and the establishment of an independent Macedonian state. While it gained some early support from the Balkan communist parties, it was later persecuted by the Yugoslav authorities on the grounds that its supporters were Macedonian separatists or Bulgarian nationalists and therefore posed a threat to the unity of the Yugoslav state. By 1937 IMRO (United) was disbanded. Later, in 1944, some of its leaders participated in the establishment of Macedonia as a federal state of the country that would become the People’s (and later Socialist) Republic of Yugoslavia.
    In the early 21st century the historical legacy of IMRO could still be felt. In 1996 a Bulgarian political party was founded with the name IMRO–Bulgarian National Movement, and in 1990, the year before the Republic of Macedonia declared its independence from Yugoslavia, a Macedonian political party was founded with the name IMRO–Democratic Party for Macedonian National Unity.

    - - - Aktualisiert - - -

    Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization (IMRO), Macedonian Vatreshna Makedonska-Revolutsionerna Organizatsiya(VMRO), Bulgarian Vŭtreshnata Makedono-Odrinska Revolutsionna Organizatsiya (VMRO), secret revolutionary society that was active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its many incarnations struggled with two contradictory goals: establishing Macedonia as an autonomous state on the one hand and promoting Bulgarian political interests on the other.
    IMRO was founded in 1893 in Thessaloníki; its early leaders included Damyan Gruev, Gotsé Delchev, and Yane Sandanski, men who had a Macedonian regional identity and a Bulgarian national identity. Their goal was to win autonomy for a large portion of the geographical region of Macedonia from itsOttoman Turkish rulers. In 1903, having gained substantial support among the Slav Christian populations of Macedonia, IMRO staged the Ilinden Uprising, a significant but unsuccessful rebellion that was rapidly suppressed by the Ottoman authorities. Subsequently IMRO split into two separate factions: a leftist, pro-Macedonian wing based in Macedonia, which continued to advocate for an independent Macedonia, and a rightist, pro-Bulgarian wing (referred to as the Supremacist or Vrhovist wing) based in Sofia, which sought to annex Macedonia to Bulgaria and promoted Bulgarian political and military interests more generally. For the next few decades, the rightist wing engaged in a campaign of terror and assassination against its opponents.
    During the Balkan Wars of 1912–13 (when the region of Macedonia was divided among Serbia,Greece, and Bulgaria) and World War I, which followed, IMRO’s increasingly indiscriminate use of terror alienated both its Macedonian and its Bulgarian supporters. The rightist, pro-Bulgarian wing of IMRO under Todor Aleksandrov assassinated Bulgaria’s prime minister, Aleksandŭr Stamboliyski, in 1923. The next year Aleksandrov himself was assassinated, at which time Alexander Protogerov assumed control of the organization, only to be displaced by Ivan Mihailov. The Mihailovists, as they were known, continued to identify closely with Bulgaria and to support Bulgarian irredentism. They had close ties to diaspora organizations abroad, the most important of which was the Macedonian Political Organization in the United States and Canada. When a new Bulgarian government came to power in 1934, it outlawed IMRO and arrested or expelled its leaders.
    The leftist, pro-Macedonian wing of IMRO, which coalesced in 1925 as IMRO (United), continued to promote the cause of Macedonian nationalism and the establishment of an independent Macedonian state. While it gained some early support from the Balkan communist parties, it was later persecuted by the Yugoslav authorities on the grounds that its supporters were Macedonian separatists or Bulgarian nationalists and therefore posed a threat to the unity of the Yugoslav state. By 1937 IMRO (United) was disbanded. Later, in 1944, some of its leaders participated in the establishment of Macedonia as a federal state of the country that would become the People’s (and later Socialist) Republic of Yugoslavia.
    In the early 21st century the historical legacy of IMRO could still be felt. In 1996 a Bulgarian political party was founded with the name IMRO–Bulgarian National Movement, and in 1990, the year before the Republic of Macedonia declared its independence from Yugoslavia, a Macedonian political party was founded with the name IMRO–Democratic Party for Macedonian National Unity.

  6. #756
    Avatar von Metho

    Registriert seit
    01.08.2013
    Beiträge
    6.199
    Hier ein Wiki Beitrag über Todor Aleksandrov



    Todor Aleksandrov Poporushov also transliterated as Todor Alexandrov (Bulgarian:Тодор Александров) also speltAlexandroff, (March 4, 1881 - August 31, 1924) was a Macedonian Bulgarian freedom fighter and member of the Bulgarian Macedonian-Adrianople Revolutionary Committees (BMARC) and later of the Central Committee of the Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organisation (IMRO).[1][2][3][4] In the Republic of Macedonia Todor Aleksandrov, who previously was dismissed asBulgarophile, has been recently added to the country's historical heritage.

    Aleksandrov was born in the Novo Selo suburb of Štip, in the Kosovo Vilayet of the Ottoman Empire (present-day Republic of Macedonia) to Aleksandar Poporushev and Marija Aleksandrova. In 1898, he finished the Bulgarian Pedagogical School in Skopjeand became a Bulgarian teacher consecutively in the towns of Kocani, Kratovo, the village of Vinica, and Štip. He also attended theBulgarian Men's High School of Thessaloniki.
    In 1903 Todor Aleksandrov distinguished himself as an extraordinary leader and organizer of the Kocani Revolutionary District. He was arrested by the Ottoman authorities on March 3, 1903 and sent to Skopje under enforced police escort during the same night. He was sentenced to five years of solitary confinement by the extraordinary court there. In April 1904, he was released after an amnesty. Soon afterwards, he was appointed a head teacher in the Second high-school in Štip. Aleksandrov, in co-operation with Todor Lazarov and Mishe Razvigorov, worked day and night to organize the Štip Revolutionary District. The results of his activities were detected by the Ottoman authorities and in November 1904 he was forbidden to teach. On January 10, 1905 Aleksandrov's house was surrounded by a numerous troops but he succeeded in breaking through the military cordoned and immediately joined the cheta (band) of Mishe Razvigorov where he became its secretary. Aleksandrov attended the First Congress of the Skopje Revolutionary Region as a delegate from the Štip district.

    Bulgarian certificate of adulthood (baccalauréat) of Todor Aleksandrov (1898).

    His deteriorating health lead him to become a teacher in Bulgaria — the Black Sea town of Burgas in 1906, but after learning about the death of Mishe Razvigorov, he abandoned his work as a teacher and returned to Macedonia at once. In November 1907, Aleksandrov was elected as a district vojvoda (commander) by the Third Congress of the Skopje Revolutionary District.
    On August 2, 1909, the Ottomans made another attempt to arrest him but failed again. In the spring of 1910 he and his cheta traversed the Skopje region and organized the revolutionary activities. At the beginning of 1911, Todor Aleksandrov became a member of the Central Committee of the IMARO. In 1912, he became a vojvoda in the Kilkis and Thessaloniki districts where he carried out a number of sabotages against Ottoman targets, facilitating this way the Bulgarian cause in the First Balkan War. He supported the Bulgarian army. In 1913, he was at the headquarters of the Third brigade of the Macedonian Militia in the Bulgarian army. After 1913 he organized the IMARO resistance against other nationalities - Serbs and Greeks. On November 4, 1919, Aleksandrov was arrested by the government ofAleksandar Stamboliyski but he succeeded to escape nine days later. In the spring of 1920, Aleksandrov went with a cheta to Serbian Macedonia where he restored the revolutionary organization and attracted the world's attention to the unsolved Macedonian question. At the end of 1922, there was a bounty of 250,000 denars placed on him by the Serbian authorities in Belgrade.
    In 1924 IMRO entered negotiations with the Comintern about collaboration between the communists and the creation of a united Macedonian movement. The idea for a new unified organization was supported by the Soviet Union, which saw a chance for using this well developed revolutionary movement to spread revolution in the Balkans and destabilize the Balkan monarchies. Alexandrov defended IMRO's independence and refused to concede on practically all points requested by the Communists. No agreement was reached besides a paper "Manifesto" (the so-called May Manifesto of 6 May 1924), in which the objectives of the unified Macedonian liberation movement were presented: independence and unification of partitioned Macedonia, fighting all the neighbouring Balkan monarchies, forming a Balkan Communist Federation and cooperation with the Soviet Union. Failing to secure Alexandrov's cooperation, the Comintern decided to discredit him and published the contents of the Manifesto on 28 July 1924 in the "Balkan Federation" newspaper. Todor Aleksandrov and Aleksandar Protogerov promptly denied through the Bulgarian press that they have ever signed any agreements, claiming that the May Manifesto was a communist forgery. Shortly after, Alexandrov was assassinated in unclear circumstances, when a member in his cheta shot him on August 31, 1924 in the Pirin Mountains. He was survived by a wife (Vangelia), son (Alexander) and daughter (Maria). Maria Aleksandrova (Koeva) was a strong proponent of her father's ideals and IMRO's charter.

    IMRO and Alexandrov himself aimed at an autonomous Macedonia, with its capital at Salonika and prevailing Macedonian Bulgarian element. He dreamed about transforming the Balkans into a federation through reconstruction of Yugoslavia into a federal state, in which Macedonia would enter as a member on equal rights with the other members. He took also into consideration the decomposition of Greece and the incorporation into the autonomous Macedonia of the Macedonian territory which was under the Greek dominion. The part of Macedonia which was in Bulgaria must also be incorporated into the autonomous Macedonia.[6] His view does not indicate any doubt about the Bulgarian ethnic character of Macedonian Bulgarians then.[7][8]

  7. #757
    Avatar von Metho

    Registriert seit
    01.08.2013
    Beiträge
    6.199
    Im Schatten des Krieges: Besatzung oder Anschluss - Befreiung oder ... - Björn Opfer - Google Books

    Mit der Gründung der „Inneren Makedonischen Revolutionären Organisation“, kurz „IMRO“, am 23.10.1893 kam ein neuer und entscheidender Faktor in die Auseinandersetzung um die makedonischen Frage und das Schicksal Makedoniens hinzu. Die IMRO sollte den „Brennpunkt Makedonien“ bis in die Mitte der 1930er Jahre prägen, versank anschließend jedoch weitgehend in der Bedeutungslosigkeit. Durch die Anerkennung der ethnischen bzw. slawischen Makedonier am 29.11.1943 als gleichberechtigt mit den anderen jugoslawischen Völkern bzw. als eigenständige Nation auf der Zweiten Sitzung des Antifaschistischen Rates der Nationalen Befreiung Jugoslawiens und der damit verbundenen Schaffung eines makedonischen Staatswesens im Jahre 1944 war der IMRO überdies die politische Grundlage entzogen. Dennoch war die IMRO für die Entwicklung der makedonischen Bevölkerung bis hin zu einer Nation in einem eigenen Staatswesen auf dem Gebiet der heutigen Republik Makedonien ein zusätzlicher Faktor.

    Die Gründung der IMRO in Thessaloniki
    Die Gründer der IMRO: 26: Dame Gruev; 27: Dr. Christo Tatartcev; 28: Petar Pop Arsov; 29 Anton Dimitrov; 30: Hristo Batandjiev; 31: Ivan Hadzi Nikolov (Quelle: Wikimedia.org)

    In der Wohnung des Buchhändlers Ivan Nikolov in Thessaloniki trafen sich am 23.10.1893 sechs junge Leute und gründeten die „Innere Makedonische Revolutionäre Organisation“ („IMRO“). In den Statuten der IMRO wurde festgelegt: Die Tätigkeit der Organisation sei geheim und erstrecke sich nur auf Makedonien. Mitglieder in der IMRO können nur in Makedonien geborene oder lebende Personen sein. Die IMRO agiere unabhängig von den Nachbarstaaten Bulgarien, Griechenland und Serbien und habe eine Autonomie Makedoniens zum Ziel. Zur Zeit der Gründung der IMRO befand sich Makedonien noch unter der Herrschaft des Osmanischen Reiches, während die Nachbarstaaten Bulgarien, Griechenland und Serbien bereits unabhängig waren. Die in den Statuten festgelegte Autonomie Makedoniens sollte innerhalb des Osmanischen Reiches verwirklicht werden. Eine Unabhängigkeit Makedoniens oder den Anschluss Makedoniens an Bulgarien ließen die damaligen internationalen politischen Rahmenbedingungen nicht zu. Dennoch bildeten sich sehr bald innerhalb der IMRO Flügel die entweder für die Unabhängigkeit oder den Anschluss an Bulgarien eintraten.
    Die IMRO und Goce Delčev
    Goce Delčev (Quelle: Wikimedia.org)

    Goce Delčev wurde am 04.02.1872 in Kukusch (heute griechische Region Zentral-Makedonien) geboren und besuchte das Kyrill- und Method-Gymnasium in Thessaloniki. Danach trat er in der bulgarischen Hauptstadt Sofia in die Militärakademie ein, die er wegen sozialistischer Ideen nach zwei Jahren wieder verlassen musste. Schließlich arbeite er als Lehrer in einem Dorf bei Štip (heute Republik Makedonien), traf dort auf das Gründungsmitglied und den Sekretär der IMRO Dame Gruev und trat der Organisation bei. Auf dem Zweiten Kongress der IMRO im Jahre 1896 in Thessaloniki wurde Goce Delčev in das Zentralkomitee der Organisation gewählt. Unter seinem Einfluss wurde die IMRO zu einer strafferen Organisation mit einer entsprechenden Führung ausgebaut und ihre Tätigkeit über Makedonien hinaus auf die Region von Adrianopel (Thrakien) ausgedehnt. Mitglieder konnten jetzt alle Personen unabhängig von ihrer Nationalität und Religion werden, die auf dem Gebiet der europäischen Türkei lebten. Ziel der IMRO war fortan eine Autonomie für Makedonien und Adrianopel, die durch revolutionäre Mittel erreicht werden sollte. Zu diesem Zweck baute die IMRO unter der Führung von Goce Delčev ein weitverzweigtes Netz von Komitees aus, die auf sechs revolutionäre Regionen aufgeteilt und die wiederum in Distrikte unterteilt waren. Die Distrikte verfügten über bewaffneten Abteilungen. An der Spitze stand die Kommandozentrale in Thessaloniki. Innerhalb der IMRO wurde eine eigene Verwaltung und Gerichtsbarkeit, die auch Todesurteile fällen konnte, aufgebaut. Welchen Standpunkt Goce Delčev für die Zukunft Makedoniens letztendlich vertrat muss nach dem gegenwärtigen Stand der Forschung offen bleiben. Die Autonomie Makedoniens im Rahmen des Osmanischen Reiches war wahrscheinlich ein pragmatischer Standpunkt, da die damaligen internationalen politischen Rahmenbedingungen eine Unabhängigkeit Makedoniens oder einen Anschluss Makedoniens an Bulgarien nicht zuließen. Für Goce Delčev dürfte sich daher die Frage nach dem Schicksal Makedoniens außerhalb des Osmanischen Reiches nicht gestellt haben. Sein früher Tod am 04.05.1903 hat dann eine Positionierung in dieser Frage nicht mehr möglich gemacht.
    Die IMRO und interne Machtkämpfe
    Im Jahre 1895 wurde innerhalb der IMRO das „Oberste Komitee für Makedonien und Adrianopel“ gegründet. Dieses Komitee war die organisatorische Basis für den Flügel innerhalb der IMRO, der für den Anschluss Makedoniens an Bulgarien eintrat. Es hatte seinen Sitz in der bulgarischen Hauptstadt Sofia und stand auch unter der Kontrolle von Bulgarien. Auch das Komitee hatte seine eigenen bewaffneten Kräfte, die von der bulgarischen Armee unterstützt wurden. Diese bewaffneten „Komitadschis“ wurde sowohl gegen die Osmanen als auch gegen Konkurrenten aus Griechenland und Serbien eingesetzt. Doch ging es bei den Auseinandersetzungen auch um die Macht innerhalb der IMRO. Die Region Makedonien war zu dieser Zeit ein „Hexenkessel“ voller Brutalität, Gewalt und Mord. Die europäischen Großmächte wirkten ihrerseits im Geheimen durch ihre Agenten mit, da sie vor allem aus strategischen und machtpolitischen Gründen über die Lage informiert sein wollten. Auf dem Höhepunkt der blutigen Auseinandersetzung um Makedonien verlangten Österreich-Ungarn und das Russische Reich im Februar 1903 von der osmanischen Regierung die Ernennung eines Generalinspekteurs für die drei makedonischen Wilayets (osmanische Verwaltungseinheiten) und die Reorganisation der osmanischen Gendarmerie unter der Führung europäischer Offiziere. Bulgarien signalisierte die Bereitschaft das Oberste Komitee für Makedonien und Adrianopel aufzulösen. Vor diesem Hintergrund schien der osmanische Sultan Abdul Hamid die Forderung der europäischen Mächte akzeptieren zu wollen. Die Verhandlung darüber zoge sich jedoch hin und wurde durch den Ilinden-Aufstand überholt.
    Die IMRO und der Ilinden-Aufstand
    Ilindenflagge (Quelle: Wikimedia.org)

    Im Rahmen der Flügelkämpfe innerhalb der IMRO setzte sich das pro-bulgarische Komitee schließlich durch und installierte mit Ivan Garvanov einen Bulgaren als Präsidenten an der Spitze der IMRO. Im Frühjahr 1903 beschloss der Kongress der IMRO einen allgemeinen Aufstand in Makedonien und Adrianopel auszurufen. Durch diesen Aufstand sollte die europäische Öffentlichkeit auf die noch offene makedonische Frage aufmerksam gemacht und die europäische Mächte veranlasst werden, Druck auf das Osmanische Reich zugunsten einer Autonomie Makedoniens auszuüben. Sowohl Goce Delčev als auch eine Reihe andere wichtiger Führer der IMRO widersetzten sich dem Beschluss des Kongresses. Sie waren der Auffassung, dass die Bevölkerung von Makedonien auf einen derart umfangreichen Aufstand nicht vorbereitet sei und behielten recht. Dieser Widerstand gegen den Aufstand scheiterte aber aufgrund des Todes von Goce Delčev. Er geriet am 04.05.1903 in einem osmanischen Hinterhalt und wurde ermordet. Es halten sich bis heute Vermutungen das er von seinen Gegnern innerhalb der IMRO verraten wurde. Der Aufstand brach am 02.08.1903 sowohl in Makedonien als auch in Adrianopel (Thrakien) aus und hatte verschiedene Schwerpunkte. Insgesamt standen rund 26.000 schlecht bewaffnete Aufständische etwa 350.000 osmanischen Soldaten gegenüber, die nach dem Beginn des Aufstandes in die betroffene Region entsendet wurden. Hinzu kamen auf Seiten der osmanischen Armee noch eine unbestimmte Anzahl von Freischärlern. Vor dem Eintreffen der osmanischen Verstärkung gelang es den Aufständischen mehrere Ortschaften einzunehmen und Gebiete unter ihrer Kontrolle zu bringen. Insgesamt hatte der zum Teil schlecht organisierte und bewaffnete Aufstand gegen die osmanische Übermacht ohne das erhoffte Eingreifen von Außen keine Chance. Dieses Eingreifen, welches besonders von Russland erwartet wurde, blieb aus. Österreich-Ungarn war nicht bereit einen stärkeren Einfluss Russlands auf dem Balkan zuzulassen. Nach etwa einem Monat war der Aufstand im Keim erstickt. Es kam danach zwar noch zu Guerilla-Aktionen, doch änderte es nichts an der Niederlage für die IMRO und Makedonien.
    Die IMRO und die Zeit nach dem Aufstand
    Nach dem Aufstand intervenierten die europäischen Großmächte ein weiteres Mal beim osmanischen Sultan und forderten Reformen in den makedonischen Wilayets zur Verbesserung der Situation für die makedonische Bevölkerung. Bereits im September 1903 hatten sich der österreich-ungarische Kaiser Franz Joseph I. und der russische Zar Nikolaus II. auf ein konkretes Reformprogramm für die makedonischen Gebiete des Osmanischen Reiches geeinigt, das nun dem osmanischen Sultan auferlegt werden sollte. Dem Gouverneur von Makedonien, Halmi Pascha, wurde ein österreich-ungarischer und ein russischer Vertreter zur Seite gestellt. Diese europäischen Vertreter sollten sich vor allem der Belange der christlichen Bevölkerung Makedoniens annehmen. An der Spitze der osmanischen Gendarmarie in Makedonien wurde der italienische General de Giorgis berufen. Dieser sollte mit Unterstützung von Offizieren aus Frankreich, Italien, Österreich-Ungarn, Russland und dem Vereinigten Königreich eine Reform dieser Gendarmarie nach europäischen Standards durchführen. Der IMRO ging das Reformprogramm für die makedonischen Gebiete des Osmanischen Reiches nicht weit genug. Auf einem Kongress der IMRO im Jahre 1905 wurde es ablehnt, da sie die osmanische Herrschaft konsolidiere, indem sie diese Herrschaft für die makedonische Bevölkerung erträglicher mache. Allerdings konnten die Reformprogramme aufgrund des Sturzes des osmanischen Sultans Abdul Hamid durch die Jungtürken im Jahre 1908 nicht mehr weiterverfolgt und umgesetzt werden. Die Jungtürken wollten das Osmanische Reich zwar demokratisieren, es allerdings auch streng zentralistisch verwalten. Eine Autonomie Makedoniens innerhalb des Osmanischen Reiches wurde damit illusorisch. In der IMRO hatte sich ohnehin der Flügel durchgesetzt, der für die Unabhängigkeit oder den Anschluss Makedoniens an Bulgarien eintrat. Allerdings verschärfte der gescheitere Aufstand die Flügelkämpfe innerhalb der IMRO, die statt mit Argumenten auch immer mehr blutig ausgetragen wurden. Unter anderem wurde im Rahmen der Auseinandersetzungen innerhalb der IMRO auch ihr pro-bulgarische Präsident Ivan Garvanov getötet. Bis zum Zweiten Weltkrieg sollte der Terror innerhalb der IMRO mit vielen Opfern in allen politischen Flügeln prägend für diese Organisation werden. Das Ende der osmanischen Herrschaft und das weitere Schicksal Makedoniens wurden durch zwei Balkankriege (1912/13) bestimmt.
    Die IMRO und das Ende der osmanischen Herrschaft
    Die IMRO erreichte von 1893 bis 1912 ihr wesentliches Ziel, die Osmanische Herrschaft über Makedonien zu beschränken oder zu beenden, nicht. Diese Herrschaft wurde erst aufgrund des Ersten Balkankrieges (1912/13) durch die militärische Intervention der Staaten Bulgarien, Griechenland, Montenegro und Serbien beendet. Der Zweite Balkankrieg (1913) führte zu einer Aufteilung Makedoniens zwischen Bulgarien, Griechenland und Serbien. Es kam jedoch zu keiner Befreiung Makedoniens im Sinne der Interessen der makedonischen Bevölkerung. Weder ein unabhängiges Makedonien noch der Anschluss dieser Region an Bulgarien wurden erreicht. Bulgarien erhielt mit 6.800 km² (Pirin-Makedonien) nur einen relativ kleinen Teil von Makedonien (67.313 km²). Der Großteil von Makedonien war nun zwischen Griechenland (Ägäisch-Makedonien, 34.800 km²) und Serbien (Vardar-Makedonien, 25.713 km²) aufgeteilt. Im griechischen Teil von Makedonien änderte sich die ethnische Zusammensetzung der Bevölkerung aufgrund des großen Bevölkerungsaustausches zwischen Griechenland und der Türkei sowie im geringen Umfang auch zwischen Griechenland und Bulgarien und aufgrund von Abwanderungen und Vertreibungen extrem. Laut einer Volkszählung aus dem Jahre 1928 lebten in der griechischen Region Makedonien nun 1.227.000 Griechen (88,1%), 82.000 „Slawophone“ (5,8 %) und 93.000 (6,7 %) Einwohner anderen Ursprungs. Unter der Bezeichnung Slawophone werden in Griechenland bis heute alle Einwohner zusammengefasst, die eine slawische Sprache oder einen slawischen Dialekt sprechen. Darunter fallen vor allem Bulgaren und ethnischen bzw. slawische Makedonier. Aufgrund der geänderten ethnischen Zusammensetzung der Bevölkerung in der griechischen Region Makedonien war der IMRO dort die ethnisch-politische Grundlage entzogen. Folgerichtig konzentrierte sich der Kampf der IMRO von nun an auf den serbischen Teil von Makedonien. Allerdings unterbrach der Erste Weltkrieg zunächst eine Neuausrichtung der IMRO. Während des Ersten Weltkrieges wurde der serbische Teil von Makedonien von Bulgarien besetzt und die dortige Bevölkerung einer Politik der Bulgarisierung ausgesetzt. Diese Politik wurde von der makedonischen Bevölkerung weitgehend abgelehnt. Bei den bulgarischen Besatzungsbehörden waren auch zahlreiche Funktionäre der IMRO tätig, die allerdings dem pro-bulgarischen Flügel der IMRO angehört haben dürften. Es gelang jedoch weder den bulgarischen Besatzern noch dem pro-bulgarischen Flügel der IMRO die Bevölkerung im serbischen Teil von Makedonien für die bulgarische Nation zu gewinnen. Das Ende des Ersten Weltkrieges führte dann auch zu einem Ende der bulgarischen Besatzung und zu einer Reorganisation der serbischen Herrschaft in Vardar-Makedonien.
    Die IMRO und der jugoslawische Staat
    Der serbische Teil von Makedonien kam am 01.12.1918 zum neugegründeten „Königreich der Serben, Kroaten und Slowenen“, das am 03.10.1929 in „Königreich Jugoslawien“ umbenannt wurde. Dort wurde die Region zunächst einfach als „Süd-Serbien“ bezeichnet und ab 1929 bildete sie die „Vardarska Banovina“ (Verwaltungsbezirk Vardar). Auf ethnische oder nationale Belange wurde bei der Verwaltung des serbischen Teils von Makedonien keine Rücksicht genommen. Die dortige makedonische Bevölkerung wurde einer Politik der serbischen Assimilierung ausgesetzt und benachteiligt. Die dorthin versetzten serbischen Beamten gehörten nicht zu den Besten ihrer Zunft und wirtschaftlich wurde im serbischen Teil von Makedonien nichts investiert. Während im bulgarischen Teil die Integration bzw. die Assimilierung der makedonischen Bevölkerung in die bulgarische Nation zum Teil erfolgreich verlief war dies im serbischen Teil von Makedonien nicht der Fall. Die dortige makedonische Bevölkerung wollte weder bulgarisch noch serbisch sein, was die Herausbildung einer eigenständigen makedonischen Nationalidentität begünstigte. Die serbische Politik gegenüber der makedonischen Bevölkerung und deren Folgen gab der IMRO neuen politischen Auftrieb. Vom bulgarischen Teil von Makedonien aus schickte die IMRO bewaffnete Komitadschis, die Posten der Gendarmerie überfielen und Sabotageakte verübten. Damit sollte die makedonische Bevölkerung gegen die serbische Herrschaft bzw. Unterdrückung mobilisiert werden. Die serbischen Behörden und Einheiten der Gendarmarie schlugen brutal zurück. Ein Kleinkrieg brach aus, der mit großer Brutalität geführt wurde. Es kam zu Gewalt und Verlusten auf beiden Seiten, worunter besonders die makedonische Bevölkerung zu leiden hatte. Die Beziehungen zwischen Bulgarien und Jugoslawien verschlechterten sich und die Grenze zwischen beiden Staaten glich mit seinen Zäunen, Wachtürmen und Todesstreifen fast dem „Eisernen Vorhang“ während des Kalten Krieges. Auch ein Krieg zwischen Bulgarien und Jugoslawien wurde aufgrund der bulgarischen Unterstützung der IMRO denkbar. Je nach dem was für eine Regierung in Bulgarien an der Macht war wurde die IMRO entweder toleriert oder aktiv unterstützt, jedoch ihre Aktivitäten gegenüber Jugoslawien nie unterbunden. Bulgarien blieb die Operationsbasis der IMRO bis Mitte der 1930er Jahre, was natürlich auch den pro-bulgarischen Flügel innerhalb der IMRO stärkte. Als jedoch die tödlichen Machtkämpfe innerhalb der IMRO wieder stark zunahmen kam es zu einer faktischen Entlastung an der bulgarisch-jugoslawischen Grenze und im jugoslawischen Teil von Makedonien.
    Der Abstieg der IMRO
    Wie schon nach dem Ende der osmanischen Herrschaft über Makedonien erreichte die IMRO auch im jugoslawischen Teil von Makedonien ihre Ziele nicht. Die politischen Flügel innerhalb der IMRO konnten sich aufgrund ihrer zum Teil gewaltsam ausgetragenen Auseinandersetzungen nicht auf ein wirksames Lösungskonzept für Makedonien einigen. Das galt sowohl für den Kampf gegen die serbische Herrschaft in Makedonien als auch für das Schicksal Makedoniens nach einem erfolgreichen Kampf. Die Bevölkerung in Makedonien war überdies dem anhaltenden Terrorismus längst Müde geworden und sehnte sich nach Frieden. Neben dem pro-bulgarischen und dem pro-makedonischen Flügel innerhalb der IMRO gab es auch linke und rechte Strömungen. Die Kommunisten und die ihnen nahestehenden Aktivisten der IMRO strebten eine Föderation von kommunistisch regierten Balkanstaaten an. Im Rahmen dieser Föderation sollte Makedonien ein eigenständiges staatliches Subjekt bilden und aus allen Teilen von Makedonien bestehen, also neben dem jugoslawischen auch aus dem bulgarischen und griechischen Teil von Makedonien. Insgesamt setzten sich die Kommunisten mehr oder weniger für eine Selbstständigkeit Makedoniens ein, was jedoch auch innerhalb dieser nicht unumstritten war. Bezüglich der Anerkennung einer eigenständigen makedonischen Kulturnation waren die kommunistischen Pläne jedoch unklar. Die historischen Ereignisse in und um der IMRO sind in den 1920er und 1930er Jahren unübersichtlich und lassen sich nicht in jedem Detail mehr nachvollziehen. Nur in bestimmten Fällen kann noch nachvollzogen werden wer welche politische Richtung vertrat und wer von wem umgebracht wurde. In Bulgarien markieren der Sturz und die Ermordung des bulgarischen Ministerpräsidenten Stambulijski, einem Gegner der IMRO, im Juni 1923 den Beginn einer Reihe von politischen Attentaten. Dies stärkte die Position der IMRO innerhalb des bulgarischen Staates. Die IMRO befand sich zu dieser Zeit in der Hand von Todor Alexandrov und General Alexander Protogerov, politisch rechts stehenden Befürwortern eines selbständigen Makedonien unter Einbeziehung aller Teile Makedoniens. Dieses selbständige Makedonien sollte nach ihrer Vorstellung eng mit Bulgarien verbunden sein. Ihnen gegenüber stand der Flügel der Föderalisten, welcher für ein selbständiges Makedonien im Rahmen einer Föderation aus Bulgarien und Jugoslawien eintrat. Für diese Version der Klärung der makedonischen Frage trat auch der ermordete bulgarische Ministerpräsident Stambulijski ein. Eine kurzzeitige Annäherung zwischen den konkurrierenden Flügeln innerhalb der IMRO im Frühjahr 1924 hatte nur bis zur Ermordung von Todor Alexandrov Ende August 1924 bestand. Danach kam es zu brutalen gegenseitigen Abrechnungen zwischen den Anhängern dieser Flügel, die natürlich die IMRO im Kampf für die makedonische Bevölkerung schwächte und letztlich ihr Scheitern förderte.
    Das Ende der IMRO
    Nach dem Tod von Todor Alexandrov stand General Alexander Protogerov an der Spitze der IMRO. Allerdings gelang es zu dieser Zeit dem energischen und skrupellosen Ivan Mihajlov immer größeren Einfluss auf die Führung der IMRO zu erlangen. Nach der Ermordung von General Protogerovs im Jahre 1928 in Sofia kam Mihajlov an die Spitze der IMRO. Die Anhänger von Protogerov beschuldigten Mihajlov für den Mord verantwortlich zu sein und die daraus resultierenden blutigen Auseinandersetzungen innerhalb der IMRO führten zu einer Art Bandenkrieg. Die Regierungen des Vereinigten Königreiches und von Frankreich sahen sich aufgrund der Ausmaße dieses Bandenkrieges veranlasst ein Einschreiten von der bulgarischen Regierung zu fordern. Auch in Jugoslawien gingen die Behörden massiv gegen die IMRO vor. So kam es unter anderem zu Prozessen gegen vermeidliche und tatsächliche Unterstützer und Mitglieder der IMRO. Unter den Verteidigern der Angeklagten befand sich auch der Rechtsanwalt Dr. Ante Pavelić, der als Führer des kroatischen Ustascha-Staates (1941 – 1945) traurige Berühmtheit erlangen sollte. Dies führte später auch zu einer Allianz zwischen Pavelić und Mihajlov bzw. der IMRO, die am 09.10.1934 zur Ermordung des jugoslawischen Königs Alexander und des französischen Außenministers Louis Barthou in Marseille führen sollte. Die IMRO geriet immer mehr zu einer faschistischen und terroristischen Organisation, welche die Zerstörung des bisherigen Jugoslawien zum Ziel hatte. Der Freiheitskampf um Makedonien geriet immer mehr in den Hintergrund. Auch ein politisches Lösungskonzept für Makedonien wurde von der IMRO unter der Führung von Mihajlov nicht mehr entwickelt. Dies markiert im Prinzip das Ende der IMRO als eine Freiheitsbewegung für Makedonien. Zu Beginn der 1930er Jahre bemühten sich Bulgarien und Jugoslawien ihre bilateralen Beziehungen zu verbessern, was natürlich zum Nachteil für die IMRO war. Der jugoslawische König Alexander errichtete ab 1929 eine Diktatur und wollte seinen Staat vor allem außenpolitisch konsolidieren. In Bulgarien wurde die Regierung im Jahre 1934 durch die sogenannte Zveno-Gruppe, die aus hohen Beamten und Militärs und Intellektuellen bestand, gestürzt. Die neue bulgarische Regierung unter Führung von Kimon Georgiev setzte auf eine autoritäre Politik und verbot alle politischen Gruppierungen. Unter diesem Verbot fiel auch die IMRO, die dadurch ihre Operationsbasis verlor. Ihr Führer Mihajlov floh in die Türkei. Er starb im Jahre 1992 im Alter von 93 Jahren in Rom. Andere Aktivisten der IMRO suchten Zuflucht in Italien und Ungarn. Auch wenn die IMRO noch aktiv blieb, verlor sie jedoch ihre Bedeutung als politischer Faktor in Bulgarien und im jugoslawischen Teil von Makedonien.
    Die Entwicklung Makedoniens nach dem Ende der IMRO
    Die Klärung der makedonischen Frage für den jugoslawischen Teil von Makedonien erfolgte nicht durch die IMRO sondern im Rahmen des jugoslawischen Volksbefreiungskampfes unter Josip Broz Tito. Die überwiegende Anzahl der slawisch-makedonischen Bevölkerung im jugoslawischen Teil von Makedonien betrachtete sich nicht als Bulgaren oder Serben. Diese Situation nutzte der jugoslawische Partisanenführer Josep Broz Tito um die makedonische Bevölkerung für den jugoslawischen Volksbefreiungskampf zu gewinnen. Auf der Zweiten Sitzung des „Antifaschistischen Rates der Nationalen Befreiung Jugoslawiens“ am 29.11.1943 wurden die ethnischen bzw. slawischen Makedonier erstmals als gleichberechtigt mit den übrigen jugoslawischen Völkern und damit als eigenständiges Volk anerkannt. Folgerichtig wurde mit der Eröffnung der ersten Tagung der „Antifaschistischen Sobranje der Volksbefreiung Makedoniens“ im Kloster Prohor Pčinski am 02.08.1944 im jugoslawischen Teil von Makedonien der bis heute existierende makedonische Staat gegründet. Diese Form der Klärung der makedonischen Frage war erfolgreich und nachhaltig. Im bulgarischen und im griechischen Teil von Makedonien bilden die ethnischen bzw. slawischen Makedonier heute nur noch eine Minderheit. Einem Freiheitskampf im Sinne der IMRO wäre daher in diesem Fällen keine ausreichende Grundlage mehr gegeben. Allerdings bedarf es im Falle der Staaten Bulgarien und Griechenland noch einer formellen und materiellen Anerkennung der ethnischen bzw. slawischen Makedonier als Minderheit mit entsprechenden Minderheitenrechten. Zur möglichen Erreichung dieser Ziele bildet die Existenz der Republik Makedonien eine ausreichende Grundlage. Sie hat im Rahmen ihrer Außenpolitik die besten Chancen sich für die Belange der ethnischen bzw. slawischen Makedonier als Minderheit in Bulgarien und Griechenland einzusetzen.
    Die IMRO und die makedonische Nation
    Für die Herausbildung und Etablierung einer makedonischen Nation waren andere Faktoren entscheidender als der Kampf der IMRO. Zunächst führten der bulgarische und der serbische Nationalismus im jugoslawischen Teil von Makedonien zu einer stärkeren Betonung der eigenen Identität der dortigen Bevölkerung und zu einer Abgrenzung von den Bulgaren und Serben. Die IMRO setzte sich zwar für ein selbständiges Makedonien ein, blieb jedoch in der Frage einer selbständigen makedonischen Nation unklar. Die IMRO war sowohl eine makedonische als auch eine bulgarische Organisation und eben nicht eine rein makedonische. Zum Wirkungskreis der IMRO gehörte neben Makedonien auch Thrakien. Aufgrund innere Machtkämpfe blieb die IMRO für den Freiheitskampf der makedonischen Bevölkerung geschwächt und verspielte ihre Vorreiterrolle als politischer Faktor in Makedonien. Der von der IMRO hervorgerufene Terror wurde auch von der makedonischen Bevölkerung als sehr belastend empfunden. Weder das Ende der osmanischen Herrschaft im Jahre 1912 noch die Klärung der makedonischen Frage in den Jahren 1943 und 1944 wurden durch die IMRO herbeigeführt. Die Anerkennung und Etablierung der makedonischen Nation und die Schaffung eines makedonischen Staatswesens war vor allem eine Folge des erfolgreichen jugoslawischen Volksbefreiungskampfes und der daraus resultierenden Gründung einer jugoslawischen Föderation. Heute sind die makedonische Nation und ihr Staatswesen fest etabliert. Die IMRO mit ihren unterschiedlichen politischen Strömungen lebt heutzutage in verschiedenen makedonischen und bulgarischen Parteien weiter, die Anfang der 1990er Jahre und später gegründet wurden. Die zurzeit bedeutendste Partei dieser Art dürfte die „IMRO – Demokratische Partei für die makedonische nationale Einheit“ („VMRO – DPMNE“) sein. Die VMRO – DPMNE wurde im Juli 1990 formell gegründet nachdem sie bereits am 17.06.1990 erstmals öffentlich in Erscheinung getreten war. Sie war zwischen 1998 und 2002 Regierungspartei und stellte durch ihren ersten Vorsitzenden Ljubtscho Georgievski den Ministerpräsidenten. Seit 2006 ist die VMRO-DPMNE wieder Regierungspartei und stellt mit ihrem zweiten Vorsitzenden Nikola Gruevski den Ministerpräsidenten. Allerdings ist die VMRO-DPMNE keine formelle Nachfolgeorganisation der IMRO. Sie ist eine konservative und national gesinnte Partei, die sich unter anderem für die nationale Interessen der makedonischen Nation einsetzt. Eine IMRO im klassischen Sinne gibt es nicht mehr und würde wohl auch nicht mehr von nutzen für die makedonische Nation sein. Als Teil der neueren makedonischen Geschichte hat die IMRO jedoch ihren Platz längst gefunden.

  8. #758
    Avatar von Metho

    Registriert seit
    01.08.2013
    Beiträge
    6.199



    МИЛАН ЃУРЛУКОВ , познат како Стамболов, бил македонски револуционер учесник во македонското револуционерно движење и деец на Македонската револуционерна организација. Милан е роден во 1884 година во Кривогаштани, тогаш во Отоманската империја. Добива прогимназиално образование во Прилеп и учителствува една година во своето родно село. За време на Илинденското востание, Милан Ѓурлуков е пунктовен началник во родниот крај. Со четата од 80 лица е под директна команда на Питу Гули, со која учествува во борбата за "Црниот врв". По задушувањето на востанието Милан Ѓурлуков останува во четата на Толе паша, подоцна е уапсен и осуден на четири месеци затвор во Битола.

    Во Прилеп во 1904 година ја извршува смртната пресуда врз местниот свештеник Спас Игуменов. Ѓурлуков станува секретар и помошник-војвода на Ванчо Србаков, а по неговата смрт ја презема четата. Даме Груев го испраќа за војвода во Светиниколскиот регион, во кој во 1907 година е реонски војвода со чета од 4 луѓе. Милан Ѓурлуков е делегат на Ќустендилскиот конгрес во март 1908 година, а подоцна е избран за велешки војвода, но по наредба на Тодор Александров останува во Свети Николе. Уапсен и е затворен затворите во Куманово и Скопје, по разоружителната акција на Шевкет Тургут паша во септември 1910 година е повторно уапсен во Битола. Преминува во Бугарија и уште декември се враќа со чета во Македонија, за да организира, по наредба на ЦК на ВМОРО, напад врз турскиот султан Мехмед Решад во близина на Скопје, кој пропаѓа.

    Во септември 1912 година Милан Ѓурлуков учествува во Првата балканска војна на чело на партизанска чета № 51 на Македонско-одринското ополчение. Четата е составена од 1000 четници и милиционери, заедно со војводите Мирче и Аргир, води борби со турските сили во авангарда на српската армија. Четниците ги напаѓаат во тилот и ги избркале Турците кај Селечка планина и Студеница, што го олеснува преминувањето на Бабунски премин од српските сили. За тоа српскиот принц Александар му се заблагодарил на Милан Ѓурлуков и му подарува убав коњ. Милан Ѓурлуков го посетува штабот на српската армија и го помага, преку Комитетот на ВМОРО во Прилеп, снабдувањето на српската армија. Меѓутоа тој и целата негова чета се уапсени во Битола, за да бидат уништени, но по застапување на странските конзули во градот се ослободени. Подоцна Ѓурлуков е во Зборната партизанска чета при Македонско-одринското ополчение.

    Откако Србија ја окупирала Вардарска Македонија, Милан Ѓурлуков учествува во организирањето на Тиквешкото востание заедно со Тодор Шикалев. По започнувањето на Втората балканска војна, неговата четата, заедно со четите на Милан Матов, Марко Иванов и Петар Чаулев, влегла во рамките Четвртата бугарска армија на генерал Стилијан Ковачев. Така групирани ја поминуваат реката Вардар и ја преземат станица во Демиркапиј. Продолжуваат да водат борби во централниот дел на Македонија, додека четата е разбиена и во доцната есен на 1913 година Милан Ѓурлуков поминува во Албанија, а оттаму во Бугарија.

    За време на Првата светска војна, Милан Ѓурлуков е во авангардата на бугарската армија, која напредува кон Прилеп. Испратени е во штабот на волонтерските единици на генерал Александар Протогеров и учествува во организирањето на локалната администрација во Прилеп. По војната, учествува во формирањето на организацијата на македонските војводи и четници "Илинден" на 16 декември 1920 година во Софија.

    За време Бугарската окупација на Македонија во Втората светска војна Милан Ѓурлуков се враќа во Македонија и ја помага бугарската администрација. За големите заслуги кон Бугарија е награден со три ордени "За храброст" и неколку "За заслуга". Избран е во месниот прилепски одбор на Илинденската организација.

    Убиен е без суд на 9 септември 1944 во Скопје од страна на новите власти на Демократска Федерална Македонија, а 5 години подоцна неговата сопруга и ќерката му се лишени од имотот и се принудени да се населат во Бугарија.




  9. #759
    Avatar von BlackJack

    Registriert seit
    11.10.2009
    Beiträge
    65.392
    Zitat Zitat von Žarnoski Beitrag anzeigen



    Wie ein Pirat

  10. #760
    Avatar von Heraclius

    Registriert seit
    01.01.2011
    Beiträge
    13.284
    Zitat Zitat von Žarnoski Beitrag anzeigen
    Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization (IMRO), Macedonian Vatreshna Makedonska-Revolutsionerna Organizatsiya(VMRO), Bulgarian Vŭtreshnata Makedono-Odrinska Revolutsionna Organizatsiya (VMRO), secret revolutionary society that was active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its many incarnations struggled with two contradictory goals: establishing Macedonia as an autonomous state on the one hand and promoting Bulgarian political interests on the other.
    IMRO was founded in 1893 in Thessaloníki; its early leaders included Damyan Gruev, Gotsé Delchev, and Yane Sandanski, men who had a Macedonian regional identity and a Bulgarian national identity. Their goal was to win autonomy for a large portion of the geographical region of Macedonia from itsOttoman Turkish rulers. In 1903, having gained substantial support among the Slav Christian populations of Macedonia, IMRO staged the Ilinden Uprising, a significant but unsuccessful rebellion that was rapidly suppressed by the Ottoman authorities. Subsequently IMRO split into two separate factions: a leftist, pro-Macedonian wing based in Macedonia, which continued to advocate for an independent Macedonia, and a rightist, pro-Bulgarian wing (referred to as the Supremacist or Vrhovist wing) based in Sofia, which sought to annex Macedonia to Bulgaria and promoted Bulgarian political and military interests more generally. For the next few decades, the rightist wing engaged in a campaign of terror and assassination against its opponents.
    During the Balkan Wars of 1912–13 (when the region of Macedonia was divided among Serbia,Greece, and Bulgaria) and World War I, which followed, IMRO’s increasingly indiscriminate use of terror alienated both its Macedonian and its Bulgarian supporters. The rightist, pro-Bulgarian wing of IMRO under Todor Aleksandrov assassinated Bulgaria’s prime minister, Aleksandŭr Stamboliyski, in 1923. The next year Aleksandrov himself was assassinated, at which time Alexander Protogerov assumed control of the organization, only to be displaced by Ivan Mihailov. The Mihailovists, as they were known, continued to identify closely with Bulgaria and to support Bulgarian irredentism. They had close ties to diaspora organizations abroad, the most important of which was the Macedonian Political Organization in the United States and Canada. When a new Bulgarian government came to power in 1934, it outlawed IMRO and arrested or expelled its leaders.
    The leftist, pro-Macedonian wing of IMRO, which coalesced in 1925 as IMRO (United), continued to promote the cause of Macedonian nationalism and the establishment of an independent Macedonian state. While it gained some early support from the Balkan communist parties, it was later persecuted by the Yugoslav authorities on the grounds that its supporters were Macedonian separatists or Bulgarian nationalists and therefore posed a threat to the unity of the Yugoslav state. By 1937 IMRO (United) was disbanded. Later, in 1944, some of its leaders participated in the establishment of Macedonia as a federal state of the country that would become the People’s (and later Socialist) Republic of Yugoslavia.
    In the early 21st century the historical legacy of IMRO could still be felt. In 1996 a Bulgarian political party was founded with the name IMRO–Bulgarian National Movement, and in 1990, the year before the Republic of Macedonia declared its independence from Yugoslavia, a Macedonian political party was founded with the name IMRO–Democratic Party for Macedonian National Unity.




    Diese Textpassage musst du unbedingt raus löschen, sonst überkommt Zoranos noch das große Kotzen.

    Heraclius

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Bulgarische Faschisten verbreiten Anti-Mazedonische Bücher
    Von lupo-de-mare im Forum Geschichte und Kultur
    Antworten: 16
    Letzter Beitrag: 16.03.2006, 17:07
  2. Den Haag plant Anklage gegen Mazedonische Politiker
    Von lupo-de-mare im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 1
    Letzter Beitrag: 24.01.2005, 20:09
  3. Antworten: 77
    Letzter Beitrag: 12.01.2005, 17:56
  4. Antworten: 4
    Letzter Beitrag: 07.11.2004, 20:31