BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 146 von 431 ErsteErste ... 4696136142143144145146147148149150156196246 ... LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 1.451 bis 1.460 von 4306

News aus der Republik Nordzypern

Erstellt von TuAF, 01.10.2012, 12:44 Uhr · 4.305 Antworten · 138.747 Aufrufe

  1. #1451
    Avatar von Sonne-2012

    Registriert seit
    20.12.2012
    Beiträge
    4.395
    Zitat Zitat von onrbey Beitrag anzeigen
    Das ist alles erst nach dem Massaker dass die Griechen veranstaltet haben passiert! Die Griechen haben wahllos Frauen und Kinder gemordet, Türken gejagt und deren Häuser niedergebrannt, das steht auch im Artikel. Alles mit Zeitangabe. Hätten wir euch nach all dem auf unseren Rücken zurück in eure Heimat tragen sollen? Ihr könnt doch froh sein dass unsere Jets in Nordzypern und nicht Athen gelandet sind.
    Werde nicht unverschämt,

    Nein, das waren die türkischen Truppen, und ermordet Frauen und Kinder das haben die türkischen Soldaten.

    ''Sun reporter Iain Walker sends a shock report from Cyprus on the Turkish invaders

    BARBARIANS
    NICOSIA , SUNDAY

    'My fiance and six men were shot dead. The Turkish soldiers laughed at me and then I was raped.
    GREEK CYPRIOT GIRL AGED 20

    'The Turkish soldiers cut off my father's hands and legs. Then they shot him while I watched.
    GREEK CYPRIOT WOMAN AGED 32

    'They shot the men. My friend's wife said 'Why should I live without my husband?' A soldier shot her in the head.
    GREEK CYPRIOT FARMER AGED 51

    A HORRIFYING story of atrocities by the Turkish invaders of Cyprus emerged today. It was told by weeping Greek Cypriot villagers rescued by United Nations soldiers.

    THEY TOLD of barbaric rape at gunpoint ... and threats of instant execution if they struggled.
    THEY TOLD of watching their loved ones tortured and shot.

    The villagers are from Trimithi, Karmi and Ayios Georhios, three farming communities west of the holiday town of Kyrenia , directly in the path of the Turkish Army.

    Sheltered
    They had been trapped since the fighting began two weeks ago and were only evacuated to Nicosia by the UN on Saturday. And today at a Nicosia orphanage they told me their tales – simply and without any prompting.

    A 20-year old girl in a pretty yellow and white dress sat under a painting of Jesus tending his flock as she described how she was raped.

    She had been visiting her fiance who worked in a hotel near Kyrenia when the Turks attacked. For the first 24 hours she sheltered with other villagers in a stable until they were discovered by Turkish soldiers. She then watched as her fiance and six other men were shot dead in cold blood – only a few minutes after they had been promised that they would not be harmed.

    She said: ''After the shooting, a Turkish soldier grabbed me and pulled me into a ditch. I struggled and tried to escape but he pushed me to the ground.

    ''He tore at my clothes and they were ripped up to my waist. Then he started undressing himself.

    Baby
    "Another Turkish soldier who was watching us had a nine-month-old baby in his arms and, trying to save myself, I shouted that the baby was mine.

    ''But they laughed at me and threw the baby to the ground. I was then raped and I fainted soon after.

    ''When I came to my senses I saw 15 other soldiers standing round watching. The first soldier was taking off my watch and engagement ring. Others were going to rape me - when one of them objected and told them not to be animals.

    ''I will never forget him for saving me. He was quite unlike the rest - more like an Englishman with blond hair and blue eyes. He spoke to me in English.

    ''He helped me to my feet and said, 'All is OK now.'

    ''The others tried to stop him, but he pulled out his gun and pushed his way through and gave me back to the other women.

    ''When I had recovered, after a few hours, I went to where the bushes had been burned by the shelling and rubbed charcoal over my face and hands, so I would be ugly and they would not do that to me again.''

    The girl, too ashamed to reveal her name, added: ''I cannot put into words the horror I feel at what happened to me. I think I would have preferred it it they had shot me.''

    Mrs Elena Mateidou, aged 28 was awakened by Turkish soldiers at Trimithi.

    She said: ''My husband and father were told to take off all their clothes and they walked us down a dry river bed.

    ''Then the soldiers separated the women and children and ushered us behind some olive trees. I heard a burst of shooting and knew that they had been killed.

    ''Later they took us back to the village with our hands tied behind our backs. Two soldiers took me into a room in a deserted house where they raped me.

    Bodies
    "One of them held a gun to my head while it was happening and said if I struggled he would shoot.

    ''Afterwards, a soldier took off my wedding ring and wore it himself.''

    Mrs Mateidou added: ''I saw another woman being pulled into a bathroom where she too was raped.

    ''Later I went back to the olive groves and found the bodies of my husband and father along with five other men. My father had been stabbed and my husband shot in the belly.''

    Later, United Nations soldiers brought the villagers food. ''The Turks took it away and ate it themselves said Mrs Mateidou.

    Another woman who had been an intended rape victim was Miss Phrosa Meitani, aged 32.

    She said: ''When I saw what was happening, I ran as quickly as I could. I saw the soldiers pointing guns at me, but I was too frightened to care.

    ''I hid in the olive groves and tried to get back to where I had been separated from my father.

    ''I watched from the bushes as they cut off his hands and legs below the knee with a double-edged cutting knife.

    ''At first he screamed, and beat at them with his fists, but then he became quiet and did not utter a word. Then they shot him in the stomach while I watched.

    Farmer Christos Savva Drakos, 51, saw his wife and two sons murdered.

    ''I was watering my orchard when the bombs started to explode,'' he said.

    Shooting
    ''With the rest of the village we tried to run away through the groves and river beds but the Turks caught us and we surrendered.

    ''They searched us but no one had a gun.

    ''The the shooting started. It was one by one to start with and I heard my 16-year-old boy Georgios saying in a calm voice 'Daddy, they have shot me.'

    ''I pulled him down and we fell behind a rock, He died there in my arms. ''An officer had been attracted by the shooting and he ran up to see what was going on.

    ''He was furious with his men and ordered them to stop.

    ''My wife and my other boy Nicos, who was only 13, were dead.

    ''My friend's wife was terribly badly injured and she told the officer: 'Why should I live without my husband? Shoot me'.

    ''The officer shrugged his shoulders and walked off and a soldier shot her in the head.''

    Die türkischen Soldaten die diese Verbrechen begangen haben werden in der Zeitung richtigerweise als Barbaren bezeichnet:

    Angehängte Grafiken Angehängte Grafiken
    • Dateityp: jpg sun.jpg (147,7 KB, 21x aufgerufen)

  2. #1452
    Avatar von der skythe

    Registriert seit
    23.03.2013
    Beiträge
    3.935
    "Solange diese kleine türkische Gemeinschaft, die einen Teil der türkischen Rasse, dem schrecklichsten Feind des Hellenismus, bildet, nicht vertrieben worden ist, können die Pflichten der EOKA-Heroen nicht als beendet betrachtet werden." Das hatte am 4.September 1962 Makarios in dem zyprischen Dorf Panayia verkündet

  3. #1453
    Avatar von Sonne-2012

    Registriert seit
    20.12.2012
    Beiträge
    4.395
    Zitat Zitat von onrbey Beitrag anzeigen
    Ihr reagiert immer unverhältnismäßig und emotional auf die Wahrheit, deswegen verliert ihr auch jedes Mal gegen uns. Du bist ein tolles Beispiel.
    The Sunday Times Article on the European Commission of Human Rights Report on the Turkish Invasion of Cyprus of 1974

    The following article appeared in The Sunday Times of London on the 23rd January 1977:

    The terrible secrets of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus

    The plight of Cyprus, with 40 per cent of the island still occupied by Turkish troops who invaded in the summer of 1974, is well known. But never before has the full story been told of what happened during and after the invasion. This article is based on the secret report of the European Commission of Human Rights. For obvious reasons, Insight has withdrawn the names of witnesses who gave evidence to the Commission.

    INSIGHT

    Killing

    Relevant Article of Human Rights Convention: Everyone's right to life shall be protected by law.

    Charge made by Greek Cypriots: The Turkish army embarked on a systematic course of mass killings of civilians unconnected with any war activity.

    Turkish Defence: None offered, but jurisdiction challenged. By letter dated November 27, 1975, Turkey told the Commission it refused to accept the Greek Cypriot administration's right to go to the commission, "since there is no authority which can properly require the Turkish government to recognise against its will the legitimacy of a government which has usurped the powers of the state in violation of the constitution of which Turkey is a guarantor." No defence therefore offered to any other charges either.

    Evidence given to the commission: Witness Mrs K said that on July 21, 1974, the second day of the Turkish invasion, she and a group of villagers from Elia were captured when, fleeing from bombardment, they tried to reach a range of mountains. All 12 men arrested were civilians. They were separated from the women and shot in front of the women, under the orders of a Turkish officer. Some of the men were holding children, three of whom were wounded.

    Written statements referred to two more group killings: at Trimithi eyewitnesses told of the deaths of five men (two shepherds aged 60 and 70, two masons of 20 and 60, and a 19-year-old plumber). At Palekythron 30 Greek Cypriot soldiers being held prisoner were killed by their captors, according to the second statement.

    Witness S gave evidence of two other mass killings at Palekythron. In each case, between 30 and 40 soldiers who had surrendered to the advancing Turks were shot. In the second case, the witness said, "the soldiers were transferred to the kilns of the village where they were shot dead and burnt in order not to leave details of what had happened."

    Seventeen members of two neighbouring families, including 10 women and five children aged between two and nine were murdered in cold blood at Palekythron, reported witness H, a doctor. Further killing described in the doctor's notes, recording evidence related to him by patients (either eye-witnesses or victims) included:

    Execution of eight civilians taken prisoner by Turkish soldiers in the area of Prastio, one day after the ceasefire on August 16, 1974.

    Killing by Turkish soldiers of five unarmed Greek Cypriot soldiers who had sought refuge in a house at Voni.

    Shooting of four women, one of whom survived by pretending she was dead.

    Further evidence, taken in refugees camps and in the form of written statements, described killings of civilians in homes, streets or fields, as well as the killing of people under arrest or in detention. Eight statements described the killing of soldiers not in combat; five statements referred to a mass grave found in Dherynia.

    Commission's verdict: By 14 votes to one, the commission considered there were "very strong indications" of violation of Article 2 and killings "committed on a substantial scale."

    Rape

    Relevant article: No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

    Charge by Greek Cypriots: Turkish troops were responsible for wholesale and repeated rapes of women of all ages from 12 to 71, sometimes to such an extent that the victims suffered haemorrhages or became mental wrecks. In some areas, enforced prostitution was practised, all women and girls of a village being collected and put into separate rooms in empty houses where they were raped repeatedly.

    In certain cases members of the same family were repeatedly raped, some of them in front of their own children. In other cases women were brutally raped in public.

    Rapes were on many occassions accompanied by brutalities such as violent biting of the victims causing severe wounding, banging their heads on the floor and wringing their throats almost to the point of suffocation. In some cases attempts to rape were followed by the stabbing or killing of the victims, victims included pregnant and mentally-retarded women.

    Evidence to commission: Testimony of doctors C and H, who examined the victims. Eyewitnesses and hearsay witnesses also gave evidence, and the commission had before it written statements from 41 alleged victims.

    Dr H said he had confirmed rape in 70 cases, including:

    A mentally-retarded girl of 24 was raped in her house by 20 soldiers. When she started screaming they threw her from the second-floor window. She fractured her spine and was paralysed;

    One day after their arrival at Voni, Turks took girls to a nearby house and raped them;

    One woman from Voni was raped on three occassions by four persons each time. She became pregnant;

    One girl, from Palekyhthrou, who was held with others in a house, was taken out at gunpoint and raped;

    At Tanvu, Turkish soldiers tried to rape a 17-year-old schoolgirl. She resisted and was shot dead;

    A woman from Gypsou told Dr H that 25 girls were kept by Turks at Marathouvouno as prostitutes.

    Another witness said that his wife was raped in front of their children. Witness S told of 25 girls who complained to Turkish officers about being raped and were raped again by the officers. A man (name withheld) reported that his wife was stabbed in the neck while resisting rape. His grand-daughter, aged six, had been stabbed and killed by Turkish soldiers attempting to rape her.

    A Red Cross witness said that in August 1974, while the island's telephones were still working, the Red Cross Society recieved calls from Palekyhthrou and Kaponti reporting rapes. The Red Cross also took care of 38 women released from Voni and Gypsou detention camps: all had been raped, some in front of their husbands and children. Others had been raped repeatedly, or put in houses frequented by Turkish soldiers.

    These women were taken to Akrotiri hospital, in the British Sovereign Base Area, where they were treated. Three were found to be pregnant. Reference was also made to several abortions performed at the base.

    Commission's verdict: By 12 votes to one the commission found "that the incidents of rape described in the cases referred to and regarded as established constitute 'inhuman treatment' and thus violations of Article 3 for which Turkey is responsible under the convention.

    Torture

    Relevant article: see above under Rape.

    Charge by Greek-Cypriots: Hundreds of people, including children, women and pensioners, were victims of systematic torture and savage and humiliating treatment during their detention by the Turkish army. They were beaten, according to the allegations, sometimes to the extent of being incapacitated. Many were subjected to whipping, breaking of their teeth, knocking their heads against walls, beating with electrified clubs, stubbing of cigarettes on their skin, jumping and stepping on their chests an hands, pouring dirty liquids on them, piercing with bayonets, etc.

    Many, it was said, were ill-treated to such an extent that they became mental and physical wrecks. The brutalities complained of reached their climax after the ceasefire agreements; in fact, most of the acts described were committed at a time when Turkish armed forces were not engaged in any war activities.

    Evidence to Commission: Main witness was schoolteacher, one of 2,000 Greek Cypriot men deported to Turkey. He stated that he and his fellow detainees were repeatedly beaten after their arrest, on their way to Adana (in Turkey), in jail in Adana and in prison camp at Amasya.

    On ship to Turkey - "That was another moment of terrible beating again. We were tied all the time. I lost sense of touch. I could not feel anything for about two or three months. Every time we asked for water or spoke we were being beaten."

    Arriving at Adana - "...then, one by one, they led us to prisons, through a long corridor ... Going through that corridor was another terrible experience. There were about 100 soldiers from both sides with sticks, clubs and with their fists beating every one of us while going to the other end of the corridor .I was beaten at least 50 times until I reached the other end.

    http://www.cyprus-conflict.org/materials/sundaytimes.html

  4. #1454
    Amarok
    Nein, das waren die türkischen Truppen, und ermordet Frauen und Kinder das haben die türkischen Soldaten.
    Tut mir leid aber die Ermordung von Frauen/Kindern ist kein typisch Türkisches Verbrechen es klingt eher hingerotzt bzw. erfunden. Türken haben selbst bei der Knabenlese nur die erste gebohrenen genommen und selbst wenn die Familie nur ein Kind hatte wurde dieser nicht eingezogen. Ebenso werden unsere Soldaten nicht dazu trainiert marodierend Frauen zu vergewaltigen gar Kinder zu Töten. Das klingt nach einem krassen Schwindel.

    Es gibt typische Verbrechen für jede Nation begangen vom Millitär/Volk und Vergewaltigung/Mord an Kindern gehört nicht dazu.

  5. #1455
    Avatar von Sonne-2012

    Registriert seit
    20.12.2012
    Beiträge
    4.395
    Zitat Zitat von der skythe Beitrag anzeigen
    "Solange diese kleine türkische Gemeinschaft, die einen Teil der türkischen Rasse, dem schrecklichsten Feind des Hellenismus, bildet, nicht vertrieben worden ist, können die Pflichten der EOKA-Heroen nicht als beendet betrachtet werden." Das hatte am 4.September 1962 Makarios in dem zyprischen Dorf Panayia verkündet
    Bitte Quelle angeben, sonst bist du ein Lügner

  6. #1456
    Avatar von Afro

    Registriert seit
    30.03.2013
    Beiträge
    4.871
    Zitat Zitat von onrbey Beitrag anzeigen
    Das ist alles erst nach dem Massaker dass die Griechen veranstaltet haben passiert! Die Griechen haben wahllos Frauen und Kinder gemordet, Türken gejagt und deren Häuser niedergebrannt, das steht auch im Artikel. Alles mit Zeitangabe. Hätten wir euch nach all dem auf unseren Rücken zurück in eure Heimat tragen sollen? Ihr könnt doch froh sein dass unsere Jets in Nordzypern und nicht Athen gelandet sind.
    iMicasa Ich könnte dir Fakten posten die das Gegenteil beweisen, bin aber im Moment mit dem Handy unterwegs von daher kann ich nicht.

  7. #1457
    onrbey
    Mit schwindeligen Artikeln kannst du nicht die Tatsachen vertuschen. Ihr habt euch damals von Nationalismus und Imperialismus vergiften lassen und einen Völkermord veranlasst, anders kann man das nicht nennen.

    Schauen wir doch einfach mal was das für Männer waren die damals eure Politik gemacht haben:

    Nikos Sampson wurde als Sohn von Sampson Georgiadis und Theano Liasidou geboren. Er nahm den Vornamen seines Vaters als Nachnamen an, dies war auf Zypern bis ins 20. Jahrhundert nicht unüblich. Als Fußballspieler spielte er als Amateur für die zweite Mannschaft von Anorthosis, beruflich arbeitete er als Journalist für die englischsprachigeCyprus Times. Als so genannter Bildreporter schloss er sich 1955 der griechisch-zypriotischen Guerillaorganisation EOKA an.

    Wegen mörderischer Umtriebe wurde er 1956 verhaftet und wegen unerlaubten Waffenbesitzes
    zum Tode verurteilt. Später wurde er zu lebenslanger Haft begnadigt und 1960 im Rahmen einer allgemeinen Amnestie freigelassen.Politisch aktiv wurde Sampson 1969 mit der Gründung einer eigenen Partei, der Fortschrittspartei. Mangels einer prozentualen Hürde konnte er leicht als Abgeordneter in das zyprische Repräsentantenhaus einziehen.


    Sein politisches Konzept stützte sich einzig darauf, die türkische Minderheit und die politische Linke für Missstände im Land verantwortlich zu machen. Er präsentierte sich als politischer Hardliner mit dem radikalen Slogan Tod den Türken. Nach Aussagen der Zeitung Die Zeit zufolge brüstete sich Sampson sogar, 200 türkische Frauen und Kinder ermordet zu haben.[1]


    Als die Obristen der griechischen Militärdiktatur ihre expansionistischen Zypernpläne umsetzen wollten, sahen sie in Sampson einen geeigneten Repräsentanten. Nachdem am 15. Juli 1974 Offiziere der Nationalgarde geputscht hatten, wurde er von der Junta zum Präsidenten der Republik Zypern erhoben.

    Als sein Unterstützer im Junta-RegimeDimitrios Ioannides zurücktrat, verlor er den Rückhalt und musste sein Amt bereits am 23. Juli 1974 wieder niederlegen.


    Nach den Ereignissen auf Zypern und dem Fall der Junta wurde Sampson 1976 schließlich inhaftiert und wegen
    Schädigung der nationalen Interessen Zyperns
    zu einer zwanzigjährigen Haftstrafe verurteilt.

    Nach drei Jahren konnte er das Gefängnis aufgrund seiner Krebserkrankung im Rahmen einer Haftverschonung verlassen, musste jedoch ins Exil. Es folgten längere Krankenhausaufenthalte im Ausland. Im Jahr 1990 durfte er nach Zypern zurück und starb im Frühsommer 2001 in einem Krankenhaus in Larnaka.
    Und den Krieg dieses Mannes und Konsorten versuchst du hier gerade zu verteidigen, noch schlimmer du gibst die Schuld den Türken. Das ist unverschämt.

  8. #1458
    Avatar von Sonne-2012

    Registriert seit
    20.12.2012
    Beiträge
    4.395
    Zitat Zitat von onrbey Beitrag anzeigen
    Mit schwindeligen Artikeln kannst du nicht die Tatsachen vertuschen. Ihr habt euch damals von Nationalismus und Imperialismus vergiften lassen und einen Völkermord veranlasst, anders kann man das nicht nennen.

    Schauen wir doch einfach mal was das für Männer waren die damals eure Politik gemacht haben:

    Und den Krieg dieses Mannes und Konsorten versuchst du hier gerade zu verteidigen, noch schlimmer du gibst die Schuld den Türken. Das ist unverschämt.
    Zypern, türkische Truppen vergewaltigten Frauen und sogar Kinder:

    The Greek Cypriots charged the Turkish through the European Convention of Human Rights with responsibility of mass rapes of the country's civilians. Thousands of rape claims were made after the invasion and evidence against Turkey was substantial. Under Article 3 of the Convention, Turkey was responsible for subjecting people to inhuman and degrading treatment. The court had evidence of Turkish troops raping women between the ages of 12 and 71. The court heard evidence of a 6 year old girl being subjected to attempted rape and stabbed in the neck while her grand-father watched, after they had raped and murdered his wife .
    How Far Did Turkey Break International Law In Cyprus? - Essays. Print version paper

  9. #1459
    Avatar von Toruko-jin

    Registriert seit
    22.04.2012
    Beiträge
    15.171
    Wie dem auch sei. Letzendlich waren wir stark genug, unsere Menschen dort zu beschützen. Sie leben jetzt sicher und müssen keine Vertreibung oder gar den Tod mehr fürchten.

  10. #1460

    Registriert seit
    28.09.2008
    Beiträge
    23.630
    Ich hoffe ihr merkt, was ihr für ein Stuss von euch gibt.
    ... sprach erneut der hirnlose Student (siehe als Ergänzung die Beiträge von heute früh)

    Das klingt nach einem krassen Schwindel.
    ... sprach erneut der hirnlose Student.
    Kennt sich zwar nicht aus, muß aber trotzdem seinen dümmlichen Senf dazugeben.

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Nordzypern wählt Nationalisten
    Von Caesarion im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 81
    Letzter Beitrag: 15.02.2015, 22:31
  2. 26 Jahre Türkische Republik Nordzypern
    Von Kelebek im Forum Aussenpolitik
    Antworten: 13
    Letzter Beitrag: 16.11.2009, 08:07
  3. Die türkische Republik Nordzypern
    Von Popeye im Forum Landschaft, Tier- und Pflanzenwelt
    Antworten: 40
    Letzter Beitrag: 21.03.2009, 23:10
  4. Die türkische Republik Nordzypern
    Von Popeye im Forum Rakija
    Antworten: 1
    Letzter Beitrag: 10.11.2008, 15:46
  5. Antworten: 99
    Letzter Beitrag: 01.08.2008, 16:04