BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 2 von 4 ErsteErste 1234 LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 11 bis 20 von 35

Die griechische Wirtschaft

Erstellt von Macedonian, 13.04.2006, 01:40 Uhr · 34 Antworten · 5.789 Aufrufe

  1. #11
    Avatar von Macedonian

    Registriert seit
    24.05.2005
    Beiträge
    5.738
    Zitat Zitat von radeon
    naja, aber 15er von 21 ist immernoch schlecht...
    Vor den Deutschen, Italienern und Franzosen zu sein ist doch nicht schlecht, findest du nicht?

    Diese ''negativ''-Antwort, ist eine typisch-griechische Antwort. Allen geht es ''schlecht'', aber jeder hat seine 200€ Gucci-Brille und Gucci-Uhr, viele haben einen Zweitwagen, ein eigenes Haus, la vida loca eben, aber dann trotzdem noch heulen, köstlich-typisch-''negativ''-griechisch

    Gruß
    Macedonian

  2. #12
    Avatar von Sousuke-Sagara

    Registriert seit
    30.08.2005
    Beiträge
    7.770
    Wirtschaftlich habt ihr in ein paar Jahren eh Deutschland eingeholt, wenn nicht sogar jetzt.

  3. #13
    Avatar von Alen

    Registriert seit
    11.05.2005
    Beiträge
    2.332
    Die Deutschen sind halt ein Jammer-Volk! Deutschland ist der 3. mächtigste Industriestaat der Welt! Also wtf?

  4. #14
    Avatar von Kostantinopel

    Registriert seit
    04.03.2006
    Beiträge
    160
    YES !!!!!!!!!!!!!! GO HELLAS GO !!!!!!!!


    NASA lässt Grüßen !!!!! weiter so HELLAS !!!!!!!

    [web:26cbd6ff0c]http://www.ilslaunch.com/launches/atlaslaunches/Atlas56/[/web:26cbd6ff0c]

  5. #15

  6. #16

    Registriert seit
    02.07.2005
    Beiträge
    683
    Zitat Zitat von Macedonian
    Zitat Zitat von radeon
    naja, aber 15er von 21 ist immernoch schlecht...
    Vor den Deutschen, Italienern und Franzosen zu sein ist doch nicht schlecht, findest du nicht?

    Gruß
    Macedonian
    Es ist großer erfolgt für grichenland so wirtschaftlich stark geworden zu sein.Vor den deutschen und franzosen zu sein ist eine gute leistung.

  7. #17
    Avatar von radeon

    Registriert seit
    20.01.2005
    Beiträge
    488
    griechische Öl-quellen:

    http://www.aegeantimes.gr/images/2688.jpg

    Nimmt man alle ölquellen zusammen, dann hätte griechenland etwa 3,6 Milliarden Barrel an erdölvorkommen... Warum wir sie nicht fördern weis ich nicht.

    Siehe Karte:

    1. Etwa 1 bis 1,1 Millarden barrel

    1a. Etwa 250 Mio in geringer tiefe + 380 Mio in größerer Tiefe.

    1b. Etwa 80 Mio barrel

    2a+2b. über 320 Mio barrel

    3. 120 Mio barrel

    4. 70 Mio barrel

    5+6. Zusammen über 1 Millarde Barrel

    7. 150 Mio

    8. 120 Mio

    9. 60 Mio


    quelle(griechisch) http://www.aegeantimes.gr/article.asp?id=2688&type=4


    EDIT: Hmmm... Quelle + BIld funktionieren nicht mehr... Auf dem Bild Waren alle quelle eingezeichnet, darauf beziehen sich auch meine Feldgrößenangaben...

  8. #18
    Avatar von Macedonian

    Registriert seit
    24.05.2005
    Beiträge
    5.738
    @radeon
    Es wäre schön, wenn Du die Landkarte nochmal suchen, finden und hier posten würdest! Mich würden die Ölquellen sehr interessieren! Ich schau mich auch mal um ... :wink:

    Gruß
    Macedonian

  9. #19
    Avatar von radeon

    Registriert seit
    20.01.2005
    Beiträge
    488
    Zitat Zitat von Macedonian
    @radeon
    Es wäre schön, wenn Du die Landkarte nochmal suchen, finden und hier posten würdest! Mich würden die Ölquellen sehr interessieren! Ich schau mich auch mal um ... :wink:

    Gruß
    Macedonian

    bin dabei... Zumindest das BIld müsste noch bei meinen Temporary internet files sein... Leider benutze ich opera und weis nicht wo dieser browser die bilder speichert

  10. #20
    Avatar von radeon

    Registriert seit
    20.01.2005
    Beiträge
    488
    Ich suche noch, aber damit euch nicht langweilig ist hier:

    "Reserves of 227 million barrels east of Thassos are the biggest new oildiscovery in Greek territorial waters since the Prinos oilfield in the 1970s.They could help cut Greece's dangerously high dependence on Mideastern oil

    COSTIS STAMBOLIS

    Prinos was once Greece's only oil resource. General Federation of Labour president Christos Polyzogopoulos (C) and colleagues on a visit to the area's facilities

    RENEWED interest in oil exploration in the north Aegean Sea has been expressed by local and international firms following the announcement in mid-January of what appears to be a major oil find in the sea area three nautical miles west of the island of Thassos.

    The concession area where the find is located is explored by Kavala Oil SA, until few months ago a small company, which inherited the production facility at Prinos, which for many years, between 1981 and 1998, was Greece's only indigenous oil resource.

    Greece relies heavily for its energy needs on imported oil and gas, which correspond roughly to 69 percent of its gross energy consumption. Dependence on imported oil and gas has been growing steadily over the last 25 years and is set to increase to 75 percent of total energy needs over the next 10 years, according to a recent study by Greece's energy regulator, RAE. Energy analysts, backed by an EU study, point out that this is a dangerously high figure.

    Of the 320,000 barrels of oil a day (bpd) Greece consumes, only 4,000 to 5,000 are produced locally. All of these are pumped out of the Prinos oil field. The rest is imported by the two major refinery groups, Hellenic Petroleum SA and Motoroil SA.

    Greece spends some $3.5-4.0 billion per year for these oil imports based on current prices, a pretty high figure when seen in the light of the current account deficit, which in 2003 was 11.8 billion euros, and the country's GDP which last year reached 154 billion euros.

    The struggle for self-sufficiency

    Back in the early 1980s Greece had been producing 25,000 to 28,000 bpd from the Prinos field. At that time, local oil production had managed to cover almost 13 percent of the country's petroleum needs.

    In the aftermath of the 1973 oil crisis, Greece, like many other countries at the time, embarked on a systematic effort to discover and exploit its local energy resources. Strong incentives were given to international oil firms to carry out hydrocarbon prospecting in different parts of the country. It was then that US oil company Oceanic made its first successful offshore oil strike in the Prinos location a few miles southeast of Thassos.
    A second strike followed further south in an area hence known as South Kavala, where substantial gas reserves were found.

    An international consortium, the North Aegean Oil Company (NAPC), was then formed by Canadian firm Denisson Mines which undertook to explore the hydrocarbons commercially. Following an investment of about $600 million which covered a complex of platforms, underwater pipelines and onshore chemicals facilities, crude production commenced in early 1981 with 8,000 to 10,000 bpd. It peaked at more than 30,000 bpd by 1989. Production then started to drop as the main oil deposit gradually became depleted.

    With production falling as low as 6,000 to 7,000 bpd and without being able to explore for new deposits, NAPC decided to leave Greece in 1998. Apart from low production, there were two main reasons:

    -The price of oil in the international markets had dropped to some 12 dollars per barrel, which prevented the company from funding any major exploration programme within its primary concession area without help from its partner at the time, the state-owned Public Oil Corporation.

    -The socialist government of Andreas Papandreou had barred NAPC from carrying out any exploration activity in its other major concession area east of Thassos, where extensive geophysical surveys and exploratory drillings by Oceanic in the late 1970s had shown the presence of huge oil and gas deposits. Greece and Turkey nearly went to war in March 1987 over the mere possibility of Greek exploration east of Thasos, because a small part of this concession lay outside Greek territorial waters. Although it was within Greece's continental shelf, Papandreou was not willing to provoke a Turkish reaction. After that, any thoughts of letting NAPC explore east of Thassos were abandoned.

    Since then, successive Greek governments have proposed to the Turkish side to resolve the whole continental shelf issue for the whole Aegean Sea by submitting the case for arbitration to the International Court of Justice at the Hague, a position which the Turks are now discussing with the Greek government but have not yet fully accepted.

    Kavala Oil


    Lucky strike: Kavalas Oil hits a major oil field, three nautical miles west of Thassos

    Following NAPC's departure from Greece, the facilities and the primary concession areas at Prinos were taken over by Kavala Oil in a deal brokered by the government to safeguard 500 jobs. The majority shareholder (67 percent) at Kavala Oil was local construction firm Evrotechniki SA while the NAPC trade union took a minority stake of 33 percent.

    This scheme-limited oil production continued, while some basic exploration work in the concession around Thassos was funded by the company's restricted cash flow Exploratory work in 2001 and 2002 indicated that the area around Prinos held a lot more oil than originally indicated. In order to carry out a major oil search in the area, Kavala Oil's management brought in a new shareholder, London Stock Exchange-listed Regal Petroleum, which after protracted negotiations, became the majority shareholder.

    New exploratory drillings were carried out last October and November, as well as in early January this year. This led to a very promising new oil find in a drilling area known as Kallirachi. According to Kavala Oil geologists, the new deposit contains some 227 million barrels of oil, a reasonably large find by international standards. Not all of the deposit is recoverable, given the area's geological formations, but specialists point out that this may prove to be as large as the original Prinos deposit.

    Kavala Oil's managing director Nicholas Loutsigas says that if the fields around Thassos including Kallirachi are properly explored, and with a modest investment of $50-80 million, the region is capable of producing some 40,000 to 50,000 bpd. From a political point of view this production area is quite secure, points out Loutsigas since it is 100 percent within Greece's own territorial waters.

    Should Greece be successful in its efforts to delineate the continental shelf in the Aegean, the road is open for exploration of the region east of Thassos. Existing data suggest that oil deposits in that region amount to 900 million barrels (STB). Combined with potential production from the Prinos and Kallirachi deposits, the whole North Aegean area could be capable of delivering more than 200,000 bpd, say petroleum geologists familiar with the area. Greece would then be supplying many of its own needs."


    http://www.athensnews.gr/athweb/nath...=03&m=A33&aa=1

Seite 2 von 4 ErsteErste 1234 LetzteLetzte

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Kosovo-Wirtschaft!
    Von ach-was im Forum Wirtschaft
    Antworten: 6
    Letzter Beitrag: 09.04.2009, 12:32
  2. Wirtschaft ankurbeln
    Von 555-KS-555 im Forum Kosovo
    Antworten: 87
    Letzter Beitrag: 22.01.2009, 20:37
  3. Titoistische Wirtschaft?
    Von Reaktionär im Forum Wirtschaft
    Antworten: 32
    Letzter Beitrag: 05.12.2008, 17:11
  4. Die zypriotische Wirtschaft
    Von Macedonian im Forum Wirtschaft
    Antworten: 2
    Letzter Beitrag: 22.04.2006, 16:50
  5. Geschichten aus der Wirtschaft
    Von absolut-relativ im Forum Wirtschaft
    Antworten: 0
    Letzter Beitrag: 12.04.2006, 10:58