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Liste der Gerechten unter den Völkern aus Bosnien und Herzegowina

Erstellt von Marcin, 26.05.2013, 13:26 Uhr · 10 Antworten · 2.490 Aufrufe

  1. #1
    Avatar von Marcin

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    Liste der Gerechten unter den Völkern aus Bosnien und Herzegowina

    Liste der Gerechten unter den Völkern aus Bosnien und Herzegowina

    Diese Zahlen sind nicht unbedingt ein Maßstab für die tatsächliche Anzahl von Rettern in jedem Land sondern reflektieren die Fälle, von denen Yad Vashem in Kenntnis gesetzt wurde.
    Für mehr Informationen >>>

    bosnia.jpg



    Roza Sober-Dragoje and Zekira Besrević


    Bosnia


    The rescuers children with the Israeli Ambassador during the ceremony in Sarajewo


    Roza Sober Dragoje


    Zekira Besrević




    On the eve of the German invasion of Yugoslavia in April 1941, two young women worked in the beauty parlor owned by Mordo Albahari, a Sarajevo Jew: Roza Sober, a Christian of 19, and Zekira Besrević, a Muslim of about 20. Mordo’s niece, Gracija Kamhi (later Džamonja), was an apprentice in the establishment.


    Under the Ustaša regime in the Independent State of Croatia, Jews, Serbs, and Gypsies were brutally persecuted. The Jews’ plight became more severe with each passing day, as new edicts constantly undermined their legal and economic status, making them wear a yellow patch, do forced labor, and endure other humiliations. This was followed by deportations to the camps: Djakovo, Loborgrad, and the worst of all, Jasenovac, in Croatia.


    One night the Kamihi family was taken. Only Gracija and her uncle, Mordo, succeeded in evading the troops by hiding in their large apartment. Hearing about the Aktion, Roza and Zekira rushed to the Albahari home to see if they could help. They saw Gracija’s family being taken away, but Gracija’s mother managed to whisper to them, “They are upstairs”. The two young women waited until the Ustaša unit had left, then ran upstairs to bring out Gracija and her uncle and take them to their home.


    In the wake of a proclamation by the authorities allowing citizens to take over Jewish businesses, Zekira asked for Albahiri’s beauty parlor. Her request was approved, and she and Roza, became the establishment’s new managers. They immediately brought Gracija and her uncle to the shop. The two hid by day, but at night were free to move about the premises and partake of the food brought to them by the two young women.

    This arrangement lasted several months, until Mordo Albahiri obtained “Aryan” papers enabling him and his niece to move to Mostar, which was under Italian occupation. The first attempt failed, but the second was successful. From Mostar they sent false papers for Gracija’s mother and her ten-year-old brother. They all reached the island of Rab, which was under Italian control. Following the German invasion of this zone in September 1943, they joined Tito’s partisans. “Roza Sober-Dragoje did everything possible to rescue all of us,” Gracija wrote in the late 1990s. Gracija fought alongside her boyfriend, whom she later married; he too had fled Sarajevo with the assistance of Roza Sober-Dragoje.

    On May 28, 2000, Yad Vashem recognized Roza Sober-Dragoje and Zekira Besrević as Righteous Among the Nations.

    Marcel & Celestine Arnoldy - The Righteous Among The Nations - Yad Vashem





    Muslim Rescuers in Sarajevo

    Mustafa and Zejneba Hardaga, Izet and Bachriya Hardaga, Ahmed Sadik


    Bosnia


    Zejneba (fourth from the right) at the tree planting ceremony in honor of her family, Yad Vashem, 1985


    Zejneba at the Hall of Remembrance, Yad Vashem 1985


    Zejneba (far right) with her sister-in-law (far left)


    Zejneba Hardaga with her son and daughter, Sarajevo



    In April 1941 when the Germans invaded Yugoslavia, Sarajevo was bombed from the air. The home of the Kavilio family was destroyed. They had fled to the hills when the bombing began, and were now without a home. As they were walking to the family factory, they met Mustafa Hardaga, a Muslim friend who was the owner of the factory building. He immediately offered them to stay at his house.


    The Hardagas were observant Muslims. The household included Mustafa and his wife Zejneba, and his brother Izet and wife Bachriya. According to their Muslim tradition, the women were supposed to wear a veil and cover their faces in front of strangers. Having a strange man sleep at their home was a most unusual step. However, as Zejneba described many years later, their husbands welcomed the Kavilios and told them that they would now be part of the family. “Our home is your home”, they said, and to demonstrate this point, the women were not obliged to cover their faces in the presence of Josef Kavilio, since he was now a member of the family.


    The Kavilio family stayed with the Hardagas for a short while until Josef Kavilio was able to move his wife and children to Mostar, in an area under Italian control, where Jews were relatively safe. Kavilio himself stayed behind to liquidate his business. Eventually he was arrested and imprisoned by the Ustasa. Because of the heavy snow, the prisoners could not be transferred from Sarajevo to the infamous Jasenovac camp near Zagreb, where the Croatians systematically killed Serbs, Jews and Roma. Instead the prisoners were taken, with their legs chained, to clear the roads from snow. This is where Zejneba saw Kvilio. Kavilio later testified that he saw her standing at the street corner, her face traditionally veiled, watching the plight of their family friend with tears in her eyes. Undisturbed by the danger, she began to bring food to the prisoners.


    Josef Kavilio eventually managed to escape and returned to the Hardaga home. The family welcomed him warmly and nursed him back to health. The Gestapo headquarters were nearby, and the danger was immense. In his testimony Josef described the notices on the walls threatening those who would hide Serbs and Jews with the death penalty. Not wanting to endanger the Hardagas life, Josef decided to flee to Mostar and join his family.


    After September 1943, when the Italian areas came under German occupation, the Kavilio family had to move yet again. They fled to the mountains and joined the partisans. After the war they returned to Sarajevo. Again they stayed with the Hardagas until they could find a place of their own. The Hardagas also returned the jewelry that the Kavilio family had left with them for safekeeping.


    It was then that they learned that Zejneba’s father, Ahmed Sadik, had been hiding a Jewish by the name of Papo in his home. He did not survive the war. He was caught, arrested and killed in Jasenovac.


    The Kavilio family immigrated to Israel. In 1984 they asked Yad Vashem to recognize the Hardaga family and Ahmed Sadik as Righteous Among the Nations. A year later, Zejneba Hardaga came to Israel to plant a tree in her family’s name.
    Fifty years after the Holocaust, when in 1994 Sarajevo was under the attack of Serb forces, Zejneba and her family were in great distress. With the help of the Joint Distribution Committee, Yad Vashem appealed to the President of Bosnia to permit Zejneba to come to Israel. In February 1994 Zejneba, her daughter her husband and child arrived in Israel and were welcomed by government officials, representatives of Yad Vashem and the Kavilios. The Hardagas had sheltered a Jewish family during the darkest period in Jewish history. It was now the State of Israel that paid back the debt and helped the Hardagas in their time of distress.


    It was probably this deep bond that prompted Zejneba’s daughter – Sarah Pecanac – and her family to convert to Judaism. “It is only natural that I should want to become Jewish. It is an honor for me to belong to these people”, she explained. She closed yet another circle, when she began working for Yad Vashem, where the story of her family is exhibited in the museum, where the file about the family is kept in the archive of the Righteous Among the Nations, and where a tree was planted by her mother in honor of her family’s courage and humanity.






    Historical Background



    Related Information



    Mustafa and Zejneba Hardaga, Izet and Bachriya Hardaga, Ahmed Sadik - The Righteous Among The Nations - Yad Vashem

  2. #2
    Avatar von Гуштер

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    Davon kann man sich bestimmt was kaufen, toll!

  3. #3
    Avatar von Allissa

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    Zitat Zitat von Гуштер Beitrag anzeigen
    Davon kann man sich bestimmt was kaufen, toll!
    prestani zajebavati.....


  4. #4

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    Gibt es eine Liste der gerechten unter den Völkern aus Israel?

  5. #5
    Avatar von Гуштер

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    Zitat Zitat von TM1987 Beitrag anzeigen
    Gibt es eine Liste der gerechten unter den Völkern aus Israel?
    Wie den, damals gab es kein Israel
    Da war die Welt im nahen Osten noch in Ordnung.

  6. #6
    Avatar von Marcin

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    h

  7. #7
    Avatar von Гуштер

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    Zitat Zitat von Marcin Beitrag anzeigen
    h
    Holländer war ein ganz mieser Komponist und das sag ich nicht weil er Jude war.
    Ziemlich lahm seine satirische Kreation.

  8. #8
    Avatar von Marcin

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    Zejneba Hardaga

  9. #9

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    marcin komm ich auch auf die liste.......

  10. #10
    Avatar von Marcin

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