BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 8 von 44 ErsteErste ... 45678910111218 ... LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 71 bis 80 von 439

Ägypten droht Bürgerkrieg

Erstellt von Sonny, 05.07.2013, 19:44 Uhr · 438 Antworten · 29.531 Aufrufe

  1. #71

  2. #72

    Registriert seit
    23.11.2009
    Beiträge
    2.559
    Dieser Artikel ist gar nicht schlecht, ich muss zugeben dass ich es nicht erwartet habe.

  3. #73
    Avatar von papodidi

    Registriert seit
    30.12.2011
    Beiträge
    11.954

    Cool

    Zitat Zitat von Afroasiatis Beitrag anzeigen
    Dieser Artikel ist gar nicht schlecht, ich muss zugeben dass ich es nicht erwartet habe.
    Der Artikel ist wirklich gut, passt zum Qualitätsblatt NZZ, konservativ, aber vergleichsweise objektiv...

  4. #74

    Registriert seit
    23.11.2009
    Beiträge
    2.559
    Zitat Zitat von Yunan Beitrag anzeigen
    Hier einmal die Gegenseite:

    The Most Worrying Thing About Egypt's Coup: the Police

    After a return of Mubarak-era elements and strong-arm tactics, revolutionaries have yet to articulate a clear vision of a functional, pluralistic government.
    THANASSIS CAMBANIS JUL 8 2013, 7:00 AM ET



    Reuters
    CAIRO - History doesn't operate in perfect analogies, but I couldn't help comparing the celebration that marked President Morsi's overthrow to the more exuberant outbreak when Hosni Mubarak fell.
    Last week as I pushed past families, men blowing vuvuzelas, and candy peddlers, a policeman swaggered past in his white uniform, his belly and chin thrust forward, smiling ever so slightly. A man leapt toward him and brushed his forearm. "Congratulations, ya basha," he said, in an almost feudal show of respect. The cop nodded in acknowledgement without breaking stride. He walked like a man with authority.
    Two and a half years ago, one of the signal triumphs of the revolution was the expulsion not only of Mubarak, but of the detested police. They had strutted all over the rights and dignity of Egyptians. They had tortured with impunity, beaten the innocent and the guilty, detained at a whim, demanded bribes, colluded with common criminals. At the beginning of the uprising, the public had enshrined a magnanimous principle of people power; they won a street war and then declined to lynch the defeated policemen, instead in one instance releasing them to skulk home in their underwear.
    On the night Mubarak fled the presidential palace, a 20-year-old engineering student named Mohammed Ayman murmured with awe and pleasure: "The policemen now speak more softly in the streets. People are waking up. We know our rights."
    This week, the policemen weren't speaking softly at all. They were basking in the adoration of the latest, complicated wave of the Egyptian revolution. They joined the anti-Morsi protests, and stood by while Muslim Brotherhood facilities were attacked. In keeping with their motley history, rule of law still wasn't on the police agenda. President Morsi was swept from power by vast reserves of popular anger at an inept and dictatorial Muslim Brotherhood government. But the June 30 uprising was by no means a purely organic revolt, like January 25; crucially, it was buttressed by the machinery of the old regime and the reactionaries who loved and missed it.
    A few years hence, we'll know for sure whether the July 2 military intervention represented a salutatory alliance between revolutionaries, the military, and the bureaucracy, or whether it marked the dawn of a full restoration of the old order, of Mubarak's state without Mubarak. But revolutionaries and reformists obsessed today with convincing their fellow citizens and the world that Egypt just experienced a second revolution rather than a coup could more wisely concentrate on the omnipresent danger signs, which in the slim best-case scenario might not prove fatal..
    If revolutionaries want to build a new better state, they now must quickly articulate their vision of a pluralistic society of rights and accountable government, free from the tyrannies they have overthrown in short order: those of Mubarak, the military junta that replaced him, and the elected Islamists who ruled as if their slim electoral majority entitled them to absolute, unchecked power. And they must be just as willing to challenge military rulers as they were to toss out Morsi and the Brotherhood.
    * * *
    Egypt's revolution is in danger, as it has been at many turns since it burst forth in January 2011. Its best asset is people power and the creative, resilient activists who have gone to the streets over and over, and against three different kinds of regime so far. Its greatest vulnerabilities are the institutions of Mubarak's authoritarian police state, which have bided their time and are still pushing for a restoration, and the profound strain of reactionary thought that courses through certain powerful sectors of Egyptian society.
    There are vibrant forces in Egypt that want to chart an indigenous, authentic course toward Egypt's own version of pluralistic, transparent, accountable governance. They aren't interested in Western timetables or Western ideas about elections as the path to enlightened rule. It is crucial, if these forces are to succeed, that they see and describe clearly the terrible impasse that led to June 30 and the highly flawed, imperfect military intervention that broke it.
    With a clear-eyed, unsentimental assessment, Egyptian progressives might yet bend the country to their will. A positive long-term outcome requires honesty about the Brotherhood's errors as well as the unseemly alliance struggling to tame Egypt now -- in short, the whole halting attempt at revolution so far.

    The Brotherhood abused Egypt and its electoral prerogative. Most insulting was the constitution that was rammed through in a single overnight session, with only Islamist participation, in an obscene savagery of the political process. There was also the state-sanctioned torture and vigilantism against the anti-Morsi protesters outside the presidential palace in December 2012, committed by Muslim Brotherhood members with the knowledge of presidential advisers. In less dramatic fashion, the Brotherhood scoffed in lawmaking at the idea of consensus or negotiation, insisting again and again that the fact they'd been elected justified any and all actions, including the president's abortive attempt to dissolve judicial oversight, the last remaining check on executive authority after the parliament had been sent packing by the courts.
    "We want a military man to rule us!"
    The Brotherhood's failures exhausted their warrant to govern in the eyes of many Egyptians, prompting the June 30 Tamarod, or "Rebel" revolt, which brought more people to the streets from more strains of the public than any previous Egyptian protest. But while the Muslim Brotherhood's behavior might justify its eviction from power, it doesn't excuse the misbehavior of the opposition, which is now the adjunct to the second interim military authority to set rules for Egypt's political transition after Mubarak. The opposition has yet to settle on a constructive vision. It opposed Islamists, but as a body it hasn't stood in favor of an alternate idea for Egypt. Some reconciliation is necessary with the felool, the remnants of the old regime. But accommodation is one thing; a full embrace another. Worse still, many of the Tamarod supporters actively called for a coup, declaring that military rule would be preferable to that of electoral Islamists. In fact, both have proved corrosive to Egyptian well-being, and will prove so again in the period to come. The latest machinations over the next government, along with the continuing violence between "rebels" and Brothers, underscore the precarious state of Egypt today, a mess out of which only the military is guaranteed to emerge stronger.
    "We are starting from square zero," said Basem Kamel, an activist who helped organize the January 25 uprising, and who joined the organizers of June 30. He conditionally supported this week's military intervention, along with the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, for whom he served as a member of parliament in 2012. But he also condemned the arrest of Muslim Brotherhood leaders this week and the closure of their media. He doesn't want anybody's authoritarianism.
    "This time," he said, "we must get it right."
    Perhaps people power is a good enough argument for those who supported this people's putsch. And the violence of Muslim Brotherhood followers only buttresses the argument that old regime remnants, the felool, might be illiberal fascists, but the Islamists hold a greater danger still. The Tamarod/June 30/Revolution-not-a-coup school seems to believe that their role is simply to expel any leader who doesn't serve Egypt. Their argument appears to be that the people don't need to write the blueprint, but will stand in reserve to veto any regime that misrules. Somebody else needs to come up with an idea for how to extricate Egypt from the practical morass into which it has sunk. Meanwhile, the people will overthrow executive after executive until one does a good job.
    Yet, many ideals that imbued the original January 25 uprising have yet to gain a wider purchase. Revolutionaries rightly mistrusted authority, including that of the military. They rejected state propaganda that held divisions between secular and religious, Christian and Muslim, made Egypt ungovernable except by a heavy hand. They trusted the public, the amorphous "people," to choose its own rules and write its own constitution, so long as everyone had a seat at the table and the strong couldn't silence the weak. They espoused rights and due process for all, including accused criminals and thugs, even for those who had tortured and repressed them. They forswore the paranoia and xenophobia with which the old regime had tarred as foreign agents Egypt's admirable community of human rights defenders, election monitors, and community organizers.
    And now, at a moment of both pride and shame, when the people rose up against an authoritarian if elected Muslim Brotherhood governance and unseated a callous, incompetent president with the help of the military, the revolutionary ideas are drowning in a torrent of reactionary sentiment. "We want a military man to rule us," a middle-aged woman with a bouffant hairdo exulted to me outside the presidential palace.
    Yes, revolutionaries and common folk and apolitical Egyptians took to the streets on June 30, and again later in the week to celebrate Morsi's imprisonment by the military. But they were joined, and perhaps overwhelmed in numbers, by thefelool, the reactionaries. Families of soldiers and policemen strolled among the protesters. Christians and proud members of the "sofa party," who had sat out every previous demonstration of the last two and a half years, trumpeted their support for Mubarak, for his preferred successor, presidential runner up and retired General Ahmed Shafiq, and now, for military rule. Whether the original revolutionaries wanted it or not, their latest revolution has the support of some of their worst, most persistent enemies: the military and the police.
    At the airport on Friday evening, a half-dozen uniformed police officers stood watching the Muslim Brotherhood Supreme Guide's speech, televised on a set mounted at the Coffeeshop Company. The Supreme Guide called for supporters of Morsi to "bring him back bearing him on our necks, sacrifice our souls for him." Within hours, that cry would result in thousands marching to Tahrir Square and engaging in a bloody, deadly and avoidable clash with opponents of the Brotherhood.
    As the Brotherhood leader spoke, the policemen laughed, while others looked on anxiously, mirroring the divisions within Egyptian society. Not everyone hates the Islamists, and not everyone loves the police.
    On TV, the camera panned over the shouting Brotherhood supporters a few miles away, mourning a protester just shot dead. At the airport, an officer with three bars on his shoulder laughed. "Morsi's finished," he said, bringing his heel down and slowly savoring the crushing motion. "In two more days, the Brotherhood will be finished too."
    Beside him a stone-faced man winced.

    The Most Worrying Thing About Egypt's Coup: the Police - Thanassis Cambanis - The Atlantic


    Auch sehr guter Artikel. Am wichtigsten ist dieser Teil hier, denke ich:

    A few years hence, we'll know for sure whether the July 2 military intervention represented a salutatory alliance between revolutionaries, the military, and the bureaucracy, or whether it marked the dawn of a full restoration of the old order, of Mubarak's state without Mubarak. But revolutionaries and reformists obsessed today with convincing their fellow citizens and the world that Egypt just experienced a second revolution rather than a coup could more wisely concentrate on the omnipresent danger signs, which in the slim best-case scenario might not prove fatal..
    If revolutionaries want to build a new better state, they now must quickly articulate their vision of a pluralistic society of rights and accountable government, free from the tyrannies they have overthrown in short order: those of Mubarak, the military junta that replaced him, and the elected Islamists who ruled as if their slim electoral majority entitled them to absolute, unchecked power. And they must be just as willing to challenge military rulers as they were to toss out Morsi and the Brotherhood.
    * * *
    Egypt's revolution is in danger, as it has been at many turns since it burst forth in January 2011. Its best asset is people power and the creative, resilient activists who have gone to the streets over and over, and against three different kinds of regime so far. Its greatest vulnerabilities are the institutions of Mubarak's authoritarian police state, which have bided their time and are still pushing for a restoration, and the profound strain of reactionary thought that courses through certain powerful sectors of Egyptian society.
    There are vibrant forces in Egypt that want to chart an indigenous, authentic course toward Egypt's own version of pluralistic, transparent, accountable governance. They aren't interested in Western timetables or Western ideas about elections as the path to enlightened rule. It is crucial, if these forces are to succeed, that they see and describe clearly the terrible impasse that led to June 30 and the highly flawed, imperfect military intervention that broke it.
    With a clear-eyed, unsentimental assessment, Egyptian progressives might yet bend the country to their will. A positive long-term outcome requires honesty about the Brotherhood's errors as well as the unseemly alliance struggling to tame Egypt now -- in short, the whole halting attempt at revolution so far.

  5. #75

  6. #76
    Avatar von kewell

    Registriert seit
    06.06.2011
    Beiträge
    7.953
    Ägyptens Armee verliert ihr Ansehen

    Die Schüsse auf Muslimbrüder haben das Vertrauen in Ägyptens Armee erschüttert. Niemand weiß, wie es weitergeht, die Angst vor noch mehr Gewalt wächst.

    Vor der Moschee warten sie schon. Hunderte Männer, viele in bodenlange Gewänder gehüllt, haben sich zu Gruppen formiert. Einige rücken ihre Schutzhelme zurecht, andere legen sich grüne Stirnbänder um den Kopf, auf denen ein Schriftzug Allah huldigt. Hier, vor der Rabia-al-Adawija-Moschee im Kairoer Stadtteil Nasr City, rüsten sich die Muslimbrüder. "Sie wollen Rache", sagt Mohammed Elwan. Der 43-jährige Ingenieur ist einer ihrer Anhänger, steht aber etwas abseits. Zu gefährlich sei es ihm inmitten der Masse. "Die Stimmung ist enorm geladen."

    Die ägyptische Armee hatte am Montagmorgen vor dem Hauptquartier der Republikanischen Garde auf Mitglieder der Muslimbruderschaft geschossen. Es war der bislang blutigste Zusammenstoß seit dem Sturz des Präsidenten Mohammend Mursi vor knapp einer Woche. Mindestens 51 Menschen starben, mehr als 400 wurden verletzt. Seither fürchten die Ägypter eine weitere Eskalation der Gewalt. Aus Militärkreisen heißt es zwar, bewaffnete Anhänger der Muslimbrüder hätten versucht, das Hauptquartier in der Dämmerung zu stürmen. Doch das glaubt hier niemand. Es war ein gezieltes Massaker, krakeelen zwei Männer. Sie wollen die Gläubigen auslöschen, ruft ein anderer.

    Etliche Mursi-Anhänger waren bereits in den vergangenen Tagen in Bussen aus dem ganzen Land angereist, um ihre Glaubensbrüder in Kairo beim Kampf für die Wiedereinsetzung ihres Präsidenten zu unterstützen. Jetzt kommen noch mehr, um ihre Toten zu sühnen. Die Freiheits- und Gerechtigkeitspartei hat offiziell zu einer Intifada aufgerufen. Seither rüstet sich das Land am Nil für den Ausnahmezustand. In Kairo säumen Panzerwagen wichtige Zufahrtsstraßen, schwer bewaffnete Soldaten besetzen Wachtürme und Kreuzungen, Stacheldraht umzäunt Militärgebäude. "Wir unterstützen den frei gewählten Präsidenten Mursi. Dafür haben wir protestiert", sagt Ingenieur Elwan. "Doch jetzt geht es um alles. Jetzt schlagen wir zurück."

    Ein paar Meter weiter hat ein Student eine Matte ausgerollt. "So viele Menschen sind tot. Das ist nicht gut für unser Land", sagt Ahmed el-Maghdy. Zusammen mit seinem Bruder will er gegen "die brutale Vorherrschaft der Armee" protestieren. El-Maghdy ist ein Anhänger der Salafisten, der zweitgrößten islamistischen Strömung in Ägypten. Deren Nur-Partei, die anfangs Seite an Seite mit den Mursi-Gegnern stand, hatte den nationalen Dialog der Übergangsregierung nach den Schüssen auf die Muslimbrüder aufgekündigt. "Jetzt sind die Fronten für alle Zeit verhärtet", sagt el-Maghdy und blickt auf die Männerhorden, die sich an den überfüllten Minibussen vorbeipressen. Die Armee, sagt er, missbrauche ihre Macht. "Sie macht alles kaputt."

    "Warum schießen die auf Demonstranten? Warum reicht nicht Tränengas?", ruft Sherif Adel, 34, grüne Hose, Sportschuhe, Hemd. "Die Armee soll die Menschen schützen. Nicht töten." Adel steht vor einem Kiosk unweit des Präsidentenpalastes in Kairo und kippt eine Limonade hinunter. Noch vor wenigen Tagen jubelten hier Hunderttausende den stetig kreisenden Militärhubschraubern zu, feierten Frauen und Männer bis in die Morgenstunden den Fall des verhassten Präsidenten. Jetzt herrscht gähnende Leere auf den Straßen, Mülltüten flattern im Wind, ein paar Soldaten schlendern mit müdem Blick über den heißen Asphalt. Jungen in Unterhemden verkaufen Poster mit dem Porträt des ägyptischen Armeeführers Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. Abnehmer dürften sie schwerlich finden.
    Mursi-Sturz: Ägyptens Armee verliert ihr Ansehen | ZEIT ONLINE

    Ein Gespräch über Massenvergewaltigungen auf dem Tahrir-Platz und tägliche Belästigungen.

    Ägypten: "Gewalt gegen Frauen ist akzeptiert" - Panorama - Süddeutsche.de

  7. #77
    Avatar von kewell

    Registriert seit
    06.06.2011
    Beiträge
    7.953
    Künstlich herbeigeführte Engpässe in Ägypten! Manipulation pur!

    13. Juli 2013 13:22 Militärputsch in Ägypten Willkommen in der Coupokratie

    Plötzlich gibt es Benzin, und die Polizei arbeitet wieder. In Ägypten mehren sich Hinweise, dass der Militärputsch gegen den ehemaligen Präsidenten Mohammed Mursi lange geplant war. Die Entmachtung hat einen Beigeschmack: den der Rückkehr des alten Systems.

    Militärputsch in Ägypten: Willkommen in der Coupokratie - Politik - Süddeutsche.de

  8. #78
    Avatar von ZX 7R

    Registriert seit
    31.01.2012
    Beiträge
    21.005
    Gestern haben in München grad mal ca 50 Leute Promursi demonstriert. Ich dachte, als ich die Fahnen von weiten nicht gleich erkannte, es wär ne Nazidemo oder Hinterhupfing wär in die Kreisliga aufgestiegen.

  9. #79

    Registriert seit
    23.11.2009
    Beiträge
    2.559
    Zitat Zitat von kewell Beitrag anzeigen
    13. Juli 2013 13:22 Militärputsch in Ägypten Willkommen in der Coupokratie

    Plötzlich gibt es Benzin, und die Polizei arbeitet wieder. In Ägypten mehren sich Hinweise, dass der Militärputsch gegen den ehemaligen Präsidenten Mohammed Mursi lange geplant war. Die Entmachtung hat einen Beigeschmack: den der Rückkehr des alten Systems.

    Militärputsch in Ägypten: Willkommen in der Coupokratie - Politik - Süddeutsche.de
    Teile des alten Mubarak-Systems haben sicher auf den Putsch gefreut, als eine Chance wieder die Macht an sich zu reißen (obwohl es fraglich ist, ob sie sie überhaupt verloren hatten). Sie werden natürlich diese Chance voll ausnützen.

    Jedoch langfristig wird ihnen das nicht leicht sein. Die ägyptische Jugend ist einmal gegen die Mubarak-Diktatur aufgestanden, und noch mal gegen die autoritäre Herrschaft der Muslimbrüder. Und wie man von der Zeit der SCAF-Herrschaft im Kopf hat, haben sie es auch dem Militär nicht leicht gemacht. Wenn das neue Regime auch ihren Erwartungen nicht entspricht (und das wird es wahrscheinlich nicht tun), werden sie noch mal aufstehen. Der Demokratisierung-Prozess hat jetzt keinen Rückweg - es sei denn es kommt zu einem Bürgerkrieg.

    Das Problem mit der ägyptischen Jugend ist, dass sie anscheinend noch viel Vertrauen in der Armee haben. Das wird hoffentlich mit der Zeit korrigiert werden.

  10. #80

    Registriert seit
    06.02.2013
    Beiträge
    11.637


    Deutsche Übersetzung:
    Dieses Video ist den Fragen der Leser des Blogs “Die Freiheitsliebe” gewidmet.

    1) Habt ihr Angst und wie geht ihr mit dieser Angst um?

    Yasmine: Wir haben eigentlich keine Angst, denn wenn mit Angst hätten wir nie die Revolution gegen Mubarak und gegen Mursi zustande bringen können.
    Unsere Angst ist, dass sich Ägyptens Lage verschlechtert – und deshalb protestieren wir gegen die Machthaber.

    2) Wie gewann de Muslimbruderschaft die Wahl?

    Fouad: Sie benutzten die Lebensverhältnisse der Ägypter. Wie ihr vielleicht wisst – 40% der Ägypter sind ungebildet und mehr als 50% der Ägypter leben unterhalb der Armutsgrenze. Also nutzten sie die Armut der Menschen – sie verteilten Nahrungsmittel wie Öl, Brot, Reis und Ähnliches. So leiteten sie die Menschen, sie zu wählen. Das wurde auch in Zeiten des Mubarak-Regimes so gehandhabt. Sie nutzen die Armut und die Ahnungslosigkeit der Menschen.

    3) Hatte Mursi überhaupt die Chance, etwas zu verändern in diesem einen Jahr seiner Präsidentschaft?

    Yasmine: Ja, tatsächlich hatte er viele Chancen, die Lebensumstände in Ägypten zu verbessern. Er hatte die Chance, gute Dinge für Ägypten und die ägyptische Bevölkerung zu tun – dies tat er nicht, dann er war sehr damit beschäftigt, die Ziele der Muslimbruderschaft zu verfolgen. Er hätte auch qualifizierte Minister einstellen können, Menschen, die in der Regierung Verantwortung übernehmen können. Stattdessen stellte er ausschließlich Mitglieder der Muslimbruderschaft oder seiner “freedom and justice”- Partei ein.

    3.1) Was hätte er besser machen können, damit ihr ihn respektiert hättet?

    Yasmine: Er hätte viel tun können, er hätte Zusammenarbeit mit Anderen zulassen können – das tat er jedoch nicht.
    Fouad: Wir baten ihm eine Vielzahl an Lösungsvorschlägen an, und er nahm sie nicht wahr, er wollte sie nicht wahrnehmen. Er hörte nur seinen Anhängern zu. Zum Beispiel bat Mohammed El Baradei an, mit Mursi zusammenzuarbeiten – unter Bestimmten Vorraussetzungen, wie einen Ministerpräsidenten zu ernennen, der nihct der Muslimbruderschaft zugehörig ist. Er hätte Dinge tun können, die den Ägyptern gezeigt hätten, dass er sich nicht nur um seine Anhängerschaft kümmert, sondern um alle Ägypter. Dass er neutral ist und der Präsident aller Ägypter ist und nicht nur der Präsident der Muslimbruderschaft.

    4) Seht ihr es als notwendig an, dass Menschen zu Schaden kommen oder soger getötet werden – ist das der Preis einer Revolution?

    Yasmine: Es ist nie notwendig, dass Menschen sterben oder sich gegenseitig töten. Und ich hoffe, dass Ägypter aufhören, Gewalt gegeneinander auszuüben und sich umzubringen. Denn auch wenn sie sich in unterschiedliche politische Richtungen orientieren, sind sie alle Ägypter. Jedoch leider ist es scheinbar der Preis einer jeden Revolution, dass Menschen sterben…

    Fouad:…besonders in der Dritten Welt.

    5) Vertraut ihr dem Militär?

    Fouad: Ich denke, diese Frage ist nicht neutral gestellt. Es gibt korrupte Menschen in jeder Einrichtung, in jeder staatlichen Instutition. Wenn sie korrupt sind und es Beweise gibt, das dies der Fall ist, sollten sie vor Gericht dafür verantwortlich gemacht werden. Du kannst nicht einfach schlichtweg sagen “Ich kann dem Militär nicht vertrauen”, denn dieses setzt sich auch aus guten und korrupten Menschen zusammen, wie auch eine Regierung aus korrupten Menschen und guten Menschen besteht. Die korrupten Kräfte sollten vor Gericht verantwortlich gemacht werden und die “guten” sollten in ihren Positionen bleiben.

    6) Ist eine demokratische Wahl ohne eine Manipulation möglich?

    Wir können die Vorgänge beobachten, die Menschen in der Welt darauf aufmerksam machen, wir können um Hilfe in Form von internationaler Überwachung der Wahlvorgänge bitten - so können wir versuchen, den Vorgang als sauber abzusichern.

    7) Wie ist die Situation zwischen den Lagern?

    Yasmine: Mursi und die Muslimbruderschaft haben Hass und Wut zwischen den beiden Lagern während des letzten Jahres ausgebaut. Sie haben die Ägypter irgendwie in zwei Gruppen gespalten – die eine Gruppe, die die Muslimbruderschaft unterstützt und die andere Gruppe, die die Muslimbruderschaft nicht unterstützt. Das kann manchmal zu der Gewalt zwischen den beiden Lagern führen, manchmal gibt es keine Akzeptanz füreinander nur wegen unterschiedlichen politischen Standpunkten und bis jetzt gibt es diesen Hass und diese Wut zwischen den beiden Lagern.

    8) Ist es für euch Normalität, dass die Menschen gegeneinander kämpfen?

    Yasmine: Tatsächlich ist es keinerlei Normalität. Ägypter haben sich nie so bekämpft wie in dieser Zeit, seitdem Mursi Präsident war.
    Es ist nicht normal ,dass sich Menschen bekämpfen oder umbringen auf den Straßen.

    9) Gibt es eine gewisse Versorgung mit Lebensmitteln und Gesundheitseinrichtungen auch während der Auseinandersetzungen?

    Fouad: Ja, das gibt es. Und ich denke es ist die Pficht einer Regierung, diese Art Leistungen und Versorgungen sicherzustellen – auch während der Proteste.

    10) Welche Einschränkungen bemerkt ihr in eurem alltäglichen Leben?

    Fouad: Ich bin ein eher liberaler/freiheitlicher Mensch, also sehe ich Einschränkungen in dieser Gesellschaft. Denn die Dinge, die ich für richtig ansehe, werden größtenteils verboten. Wenn ich beispielsweise meine Verlobte auf der Straße küssen möchte, ist dies untersagt. Und dieses Muster könnt ihr auf jedliche andere Dinge übertragen. Natürlich ist eine Homo-Ehe illegal, natürlich ist Geschlechtstransplantation nicht von der Gesellschaft toleriert, all diese Sachen sind nicht nicht annähernd möglich in der Gesellschaft, denn diese ist sehr engeschränkt und streng. All diese Einschränkungen beziehen sich meiner Meinung nach auf den sozialen Status und die soziale Gerechtigkeit.

    11) Entwickelt sich oder gibt es eine Vertretung der Anti-Mursi-Bewegung, sodass die oppositionelle Protestbewegung in einer kommendenWahl repräsentiert wird?

    Yasmine: Die Anti-Mursi Bewegung ist wird repräsentiert durch viele verschiedene politischen Parteien und Bewegungen wie “6th of April” und “Tamarod” und “the rescue front”. Es gibt viele dieser Art, die die Anti-Mursi-Demonstranten repräsentieren. Auch diese, die nicht von politischen Parteien repräsentiert werden, können durch eine der Opposition vertreten werden.

    12) Was für einen Präsidenten wünscht ihr euch?

    Fouad: Ich habe momentan keinen Namen, aber eine Charakterisierung für einen Präsidenten. Er muss das Gesetzt respektieren, ungleich Mursi, er muss die Verfassung respektieren, das Recht der Menschen frei zu leben und das Recht eines Jeden, seine eigenes Vorstellungen, Überzeugungen und sein eigenes freies Denken zu haben. Er muss die Grenzen zwischen freier Meinungsäußerung und einer Bedrohung verstehen. Zum Beispiel: Ich kann nicht sagen, dass wir jeden umbringen werden, der der sich gegen Mursi stellt. Das ist keine Art von freier Meinungsäußerung, das ist Gewalt. Die Muslimbruderschaft sagt: Warum regt ihr euch auf, das ist die Freiheit der Meinungsäußerung. Nein, das ist keine Freiheit von Meinungsäußerung, du willst versuchen, mich umzubringen. Wir brauchen also einen Präsidenten, der sich auf die Themen konzentriert, die unser Land voranbringen können, nicht zurückwerfen. Zum Beispiel haben wir viele wirtschaftliche Probleme – die Wirtschaft ist desaströs. Die Sicherheitslage ist schrecklich. Die Kriminalität nimmt stetig zu. Diese Hilfen brauchen wir also von unserem nächsten Präsidenten.

    13) Wie wünschst du dir Ägypten jetzt und in der Zukunft?

    Yasmine: Frei

    Fouad: Ja, ich möchte, dass es frei ist. Wir wünschen uns, dass es ein Land der Vielfalt sein kann, ein freies Land. Ein Land, dass eine Erweiterung der letzten siebentausend Jahre Zivilisation ist.
    Vielen Dank euch,
    Lang lebe Ägypten.

    Yasmine und Fouad beantworten eure Fragen – deutsche Übersetzung | Die Freiheitsliebe

Seite 8 von 44 ErsteErste ... 45678910111218 ... LetzteLetzte

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Droht Bürgerkrieg in Griechenland?
    Von Leo im Forum Kriminalität und Militär
    Antworten: 88
    Letzter Beitrag: 31.12.2010, 12:57
  2. In Kirgisien droht ein neuer Bürgerkrieg
    Von Serbian Eagle im Forum Aussenpolitik
    Antworten: 13
    Letzter Beitrag: 12.04.2010, 22:27
  3. Der Bürgerkrieg in Tadschikistan
    Von ökörtilos im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 15
    Letzter Beitrag: 28.08.2009, 23:15
  4. Bürgerkrieg in MK !!
    Von absolut-relativ im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 73
    Letzter Beitrag: 31.10.2006, 11:16