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Syrien

Erstellt von MaxMNE, 29.10.2011, 22:49 Uhr · 2.957 Antworten · 170.731 Aufrufe

  1. #1771
    Yunan
    Foreign media portrayals of the conflict in Syria are dangerously inaccurate

    World View: It is naive not to accept that both sides are capable of manipulating the facts to serve their own interests

















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    Every time I come to Syria I am struck by how different the situation is on the ground from the way it is pictured in the outside world. The foreign media reporting of the Syrian conflict is surely as inaccurate and misleading as anything we have seen since the start of the First World War. I can't think of any other war or crisis I have covered in which propagandistic, biased or second-hand sources have been so readily accepted by journalists as providers of objective facts.

    A result of these distortions is that politicians and casual newspaper or television viewers alike have never had a clear idea over the last two years of what is happening inside Syria. Worse, long-term plans are based on these misconceptions. A report on Syria published last week by the Brussels-based International Crisis Group says that "once confident of swift victory, the opposition's foreign allies shifted to a paradigm dangerously divorced from reality".
    Slogans replace policies: the rebels are pictured as white hats and the government supporters as black hats; given more weapons, the opposition can supposedly win a decisive victory; put under enough military pressure, President Bashar al-Assad will agree to negotiations for which a pre-condition is capitulation by his side in the conflict. One of the many drawbacks of the demonising rhetoric indulged in by the incoming US National Security Adviser Susan Rice, and William Hague, is that it rules out serious negotiations and compromise with the powers-that-be in Damascus. And since Assad controls most of Syria, Rice and Hague have devised a recipe for endless war while pretending humanitarian concern for the Syrian people.
    It is difficult to prove the truth or falsehood of any generalisation about Syria. But, going by my experience this month travelling in central Syria between Damascus, Homs and the Mediterranean coast, it is possible to show how far media reports differ markedly what is really happening. Only by understanding and dealing with the actual balance of forces on the ground can any progress be made towards a cessation of violence.
    On Tuesday I travelled to Tal Kalakh, a town of 55,000 people just north of the border with Lebanon, which was once an opposition bastion. Three days previously, government troops had taken over the town and 39 Free Syrian Army (FSA) leaders had laid down their weapons. Talking to Syrian army commanders, an FSA defector and local people, it was evident there was no straight switch from war to peace. It was rather that there had been a series of truces and ceasefires arranged by leading citizens of Tal Kalakh over the previous year.
    But at the very time I was in the town, Al Jazeera Arabic was reporting fighting there between the Syrian army and the opposition. Smoke was supposedly rising from Tal Kalakh as the rebels fought to defend their stronghold. Fortunately, this appears to have been fantasy and, during the several hours I was in the town, there was no shooting, no sign that fighting had taken place and no smoke.
    Of course, all sides in a war pretend that no position is lost without a heroic defence against overwhelming numbers of the enemy. But obscured in the media's accounts of what happened in Tal Kalakh was an important point: the opposition in Syria is fluid in its allegiances. The US, Britain and the so-called 11-member "Friends of Syria", who met in Doha last weekend, are to arm non-Islamic fundamentalist rebels, but there is no great chasm between them and those not linked to al-Qa'ida. One fighter with the al-Qa'ida-affiliated al-Nusra Front was reported to have defected to a more moderate group because he could not do without cigarettes. The fundamentalists pay more and, given the total impoverishment of so many Syrian families, the rebels will always be able to win more recruits. "Money counts for more than ideology," a diplomat in Damascus told me.
    While I was in Homs I had an example of why the rebel version of events is so frequently accepted by the foreign media in preference to that of the Syrian government. It may be biased towards the rebels, but often there is no government version of events, leaving a vacuum to be filled by the rebels. For instance, I had asked to go to a military hospital in the al-Waar district of Homs and was granted permission, but when I got there I was refused entrance. Now, soldiers wounded fighting the rebels are likely to be eloquent and convincing advocates for the government side (I had visited a military hospital in Damascus and spoken to injured soldiers there). But the government's obsessive secrecy means that the opposition will always run rings around it when it comes to making a convincing case.
    Back in the Christian quarter of the Old City of Damascus, where I am staying, there was an explosion near my hotel on Thursday. I went to the scene and what occurred next shows that there can be no replacement for unbiased eyewitness reporting. State television was claiming that it was a suicide bomb, possibly directed at the Greek Orthodox Church or a Shia hospital that is even closer. Four people had been killed.
    I could see a small indentation in the pavement which looked to me very much like the impact of a mortar bomb. There was little blood in the immediate vicinity, though there was about 10 yards away. While I was looking around, a second mortar bomb came down on top of a house, killing a woman.
    The pro-opposition Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, so often used as a source by foreign journalists, later said that its own investigations showed the explosion to have been from a bomb left in the street. In fact, for once, it was possible to know definitively what had happened, because the Shia hospital has CCTV that showed the mortar bomb in the air just before it landed – outlined for a split-second against the white shirt of a passer-by who was killed by the blast. What had probably happened was part of the usual random shelling by mortars from rebels in the nearby district of Jobar.
    In the middle of a ferocious civil war it is self-serving credulity on the part of journalists to assume that either side in the conflict, government or rebel, is not going to concoct or manipulate facts to serve its own interests. Yet much foreign media coverage is based on just such an assumption.
    The plan of the CIA and the Friends of Syria to somehow seek an end to the war by increasing the flow of weapons is equally absurd. War will only produce more war. John Milton's sonnet, written during the English civil war in 1648 in praise of the Parliamentary General Sir Thomas Fairfax, who had just stormed Colchester, shows a much deeper understanding of what civil wars are really like than anything said by David Cameron or William Hague. He wrote:
    For what can war but endless war still breed?
    Till truth and right from violence be freed,
    And public faith clear'd from the shameful brand
    Of public fraud. In vain doth valour bleed
    While avarice and rapine share the land.

    Foreign media portrayals of the conflict in Syria are dangerously inaccurate - Comment - Voices - The Independent

  2. #1772
    Leo
    Avatar von Leo

    Registriert seit
    25.06.2010
    Beiträge
    3.440
    Zitat Zitat von Yunan Beitrag anzeigen
    Foreign media portrayals of the conflict in Syria are dangerously inaccurate


    World View: It is naive not to accept that both sides are capable of manipulating the facts to serve their own interests



















    Share

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    Every time I come to Syria I am struck by how different the situation is on the ground from the way it is pictured in the outside world. The foreign media reporting of the Syrian conflict is surely as inaccurate and misleading as anything we have seen since the start of the First World War. I can't think of any other war or crisis I have covered in which propagandistic, biased or second-hand sources have been so readily accepted by journalists as providers of objective facts.

    A result of these distortions is that politicians and casual newspaper or television viewers alike have never had a clear idea over the last two years of what is happening inside Syria. Worse, long-term plans are based on these misconceptions. A report on Syria published last week by the Brussels-based International Crisis Group says that "once confident of swift victory, the opposition's foreign allies shifted to a paradigm dangerously divorced from reality".
    Slogans replace policies: the rebels are pictured as white hats and the government supporters as black hats; given more weapons, the opposition can supposedly win a decisive victory; put under enough military pressure, President Bashar al-Assad will agree to negotiations for which a pre-condition is capitulation by his side in the conflict. One of the many drawbacks of the demonising rhetoric indulged in by the incoming US National Security Adviser Susan Rice, and William Hague, is that it rules out serious negotiations and compromise with the powers-that-be in Damascus. And since Assad controls most of Syria, Rice and Hague have devised a recipe for endless war while pretending humanitarian concern for the Syrian people.
    It is difficult to prove the truth or falsehood of any generalisation about Syria. But, going by my experience this month travelling in central Syria between Damascus, Homs and the Mediterranean coast, it is possible to show how far media reports differ markedly what is really happening. Only by understanding and dealing with the actual balance of forces on the ground can any progress be made towards a cessation of violence.
    On Tuesday I travelled to Tal Kalakh, a town of 55,000 people just north of the border with Lebanon, which was once an opposition bastion. Three days previously, government troops had taken over the town and 39 Free Syrian Army (FSA) leaders had laid down their weapons. Talking to Syrian army commanders, an FSA defector and local people, it was evident there was no straight switch from war to peace. It was rather that there had been a series of truces and ceasefires arranged by leading citizens of Tal Kalakh over the previous year.
    But at the very time I was in the town, Al Jazeera Arabic was reporting fighting there between the Syrian army and the opposition. Smoke was supposedly rising from Tal Kalakh as the rebels fought to defend their stronghold. Fortunately, this appears to have been fantasy and, during the several hours I was in the town, there was no shooting, no sign that fighting had taken place and no smoke.
    Of course, all sides in a war pretend that no position is lost without a heroic defence against overwhelming numbers of the enemy. But obscured in the media's accounts of what happened in Tal Kalakh was an important point: the opposition in Syria is fluid in its allegiances. The US, Britain and the so-called 11-member "Friends of Syria", who met in Doha last weekend, are to arm non-Islamic fundamentalist rebels, but there is no great chasm between them and those not linked to al-Qa'ida. One fighter with the al-Qa'ida-affiliated al-Nusra Front was reported to have defected to a more moderate group because he could not do without cigarettes. The fundamentalists pay more and, given the total impoverishment of so many Syrian families, the rebels will always be able to win more recruits. "Money counts for more than ideology," a diplomat in Damascus told me.
    While I was in Homs I had an example of why the rebel version of events is so frequently accepted by the foreign media in preference to that of the Syrian government. It may be biased towards the rebels, but often there is no government version of events, leaving a vacuum to be filled by the rebels. For instance, I had asked to go to a military hospital in the al-Waar district of Homs and was granted permission, but when I got there I was refused entrance. Now, soldiers wounded fighting the rebels are likely to be eloquent and convincing advocates for the government side (I had visited a military hospital in Damascus and spoken to injured soldiers there). But the government's obsessive secrecy means that the opposition will always run rings around it when it comes to making a convincing case.
    Back in the Christian quarter of the Old City of Damascus, where I am staying, there was an explosion near my hotel on Thursday. I went to the scene and what occurred next shows that there can be no replacement for unbiased eyewitness reporting. State television was claiming that it was a suicide bomb, possibly directed at the Greek Orthodox Church or a Shia hospital that is even closer. Four people had been killed.
    I could see a small indentation in the pavement which looked to me very much like the impact of a mortar bomb. There was little blood in the immediate vicinity, though there was about 10 yards away. While I was looking around, a second mortar bomb came down on top of a house, killing a woman.
    The pro-opposition Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, so often used as a source by foreign journalists, later said that its own investigations showed the explosion to have been from a bomb left in the street. In fact, for once, it was possible to know definitively what had happened, because the Shia hospital has CCTV that showed the mortar bomb in the air just before it landed – outlined for a split-second against the white shirt of a passer-by who was killed by the blast. What had probably happened was part of the usual random shelling by mortars from rebels in the nearby district of Jobar.
    In the middle of a ferocious civil war it is self-serving credulity on the part of journalists to assume that either side in the conflict, government or rebel, is not going to concoct or manipulate facts to serve its own interests. Yet much foreign media coverage is based on just such an assumption.
    The plan of the CIA and the Friends of Syria to somehow seek an end to the war by increasing the flow of weapons is equally absurd. War will only produce more war. John Milton's sonnet, written during the English civil war in 1648 in praise of the Parliamentary General Sir Thomas Fairfax, who had just stormed Colchester, shows a much deeper understanding of what civil wars are really like than anything said by David Cameron or William Hague. He wrote:
    For what can war but endless war still breed?
    Till truth and right from violence be freed,
    And public faith clear'd from the shameful brand
    Of public fraud. In vain doth valour bleed
    While avarice and rapine share the land.

    Foreign media portrayals of the conflict in Syria are dangerously inaccurate - Comment - Voices - The Independent

    "Das Geschäft von uns Journalisten ist es, die Wahrheit zu zerstören, freiheraus zu lügen, zu verfälschen, zu Füßen des Mammons zu kriechen und unser Land und seine Menschen fürs tägliche Brot zu verkaufen. Sie wissen es, ich weiß es; wozu noch umsonst Sprüche gegen die unabhängige Presse? Wir sind die Werkzeuge und Vasallen der reicher Menschen hinter der Szene. Wir sind die Marionetten, sie ziehen die Schnüre und wir tanzen. Unsere Talente, unsere Fähigkeiten und unsere Leben sind alle das Eigentum anderer. Wir sind intellektuelle Prostituierte."

    John Swinton ,ehemaliger Redakteur der New York Times.


    Ich bin mittlerweile auch desillusioniert. Anfangs symphatisierte ich mit der Opposition. Die hat das Wohl des Volkes aber genau so wenig im Blick
    wie der Hund Assad. Möge Gott ihnen die gerechte Strafe geben,für das was sie dem syrischen Yolk antun,und denjenigen die an diesem Konflikt verdienen.

  3. #1773
    Yunan
    Bürgerkrieg in Syrien

    Eingekesselt in Homs

    In der umkämpften Stadt gibt es keinen Strom, kein Gas, keine frischen Lebensmittel und auch keine Müllabfuhr mehr. Und ständig wird geschossen.von Martin Lejeune
    Leben in Trümmern: Kinder in Homs. Bild: reuters
    HOMS taz | In Homs von einem Stadtviertel in das nächste zu telefonieren, kann dauern. Es gibt keinen Strom, und das Mobilfunknetz bricht ständig zusammen. Endlich ist der 75-jährige Priester Franz von der Lecht am Apparat, der seit über einem Jahr in der Altstadt eingekesselt ist. Er hatte gerade kurz sein Handy eingeschaltet.
    Früher leitete der Niederländer Von der Lecht ein Projekt in einem Kloster in al-Kussair. Die Mönche dort arbeiteten mit behinderten Kindern und Jugendlichen und bauten Wein an. Das alte Kloster wurde zerstört während der Kämpfe zwischen Regierungstruppen und Aufständischen. Nach der Eroberung durch die Armee Anfang Juni liegt ganz al-Kussair, 40 Kilometer von Homs entfernt, in Schutt und Asche.
    Von der Lecht lebt jetzt in Alhamedia, dem christlichen Viertel in der Altstadt von Homs. Von seiner Bleibe aus blickt er auf das zerstörte Restaurant Aldar, nur ein Beispiel für Hunderte berühmter Gebäude, die während der Kämpfe getroffen wurden.
    „Wir sind die letzten 75 Christen in der Altstadt von Homs und ich bin ihr Priester“, sagt Von der Lecht am Telefon. Im Hintergrund sind Schüsse und Explosionen zu hören. „Wir brauchen Hilfe. Seit über einem Jahr sind wir eingekreist von der syrischen Armee und besetzt durch die Freie Syrische Armee.“ Dennoch feiern sie jeden Sonntag einen Gottesdienst mit 50 Teilnehmern. „Wir bekommen seit über einem Jahr keine frischen Lebensmittel mehr, wir überleben nur durch Konserven, Bulgur, Nudeln und Reis. Es kommt nichts mehr von außen rein.“
    Einschußlöcher in der Wand des Kinderzimmers

    Das Nachbarviertel Alzahraa liegt in Sicht- und Hörweite zur Altstadt. Von hier aus sind die Detonationen zu hören, die das Zimmer erbeben lassen, vom Balkon aus sieht man schwarzen Rauch aufsteigen. In der Wohnung des Architekten Mohammed N. wurden die Fenster schon mehrmals von Kugeln durchsiebt. Im Kinderzimmer sieht man Einschusslöcher in der Wand. Das Nachbarhaus wurde durch einen Raketeneinschlag stark beschädigt und ist unbewohnbar. Damit nicht geplündert wird, patrouillieren Schabiha, Angehörige einer paramilitärischen regimetreuen Bürgerwehr, vor dem Haus. Auf der Straße türmen sich die Müllsäcke. Es stinkt bestialisch. Die Müllabfuhr funktioniert nicht mehr.
    Mohammed ist arbeitslos. Sein Architekturbüro wurde geplündert und demoliert. Er ist auf die Solidarität seiner Umgebung angewiesen – ein arbeitsloser Architekt in einer zerstörten Stadt, in der nicht mehr gebaut wird. Mohammeds Frau kann seit Monaten nicht mehr kochen. Es gibt kein Gas mehr. Und wenn es welches gibt, auf dem Schwarzmarkt, dann ist es unbezahlbar. Dieser Tage kursiert ein Witz: „In Homs kannst du eine Frau nur noch heiraten, wenn du ihr einen Gasbehälter als Mitgift geben kannst anstelle von Goldschmuck.“
    Entführungen und Scharfschützen

    In Alwar, der Neustadt, ist die Lage ebenfalls schlimm: 70.000 Menschen leben dort auf einer Fläche, die 500 bis 800 Meter breit und fünf bis sechs Kilometer lang ist. Unter ihnen sind 5.000 bis 6.000 Kämpfer der Aufständischen. Jeden Tag werden Menschen entführt oder von Scharfschützen erschossen. Samir Alschami, Fotograf der staatlichen Nachrichtenagentur Sana, floh Anfang Mai aus Alwar. Er hat Unterschlupf bei einem Kollegen gefunden. Aufständische verkündeten im Internet, sie wollten ihn töten.
    Das Stadtzentrum und das Viertel Alchalidia sind gesperrt, seit anderthalb Jahren wird dort gekämpft, alle Zivilisten wurden zwangsevakuiert. Das Viertel Baba Amr, ehemals eine Hochburg der Aufständischen, ist zerstört.

    Gekämpft wird auch im Viertel Bab Alsebaa. Die Soldaten der syrischen Armee versuchen, Haus für Haus und Straße für Straße zurückzuerobern. In einer Kirche, deren Dach durch den Einschlag einer Rakete zerstört wurde, scheint die Sonne auf die Helme der Soldaten. Neben einer Marienstatue liegt ein Teil einer Rakete. „Warum unterstützt Europa Terroristen in Syrien, die Christen ermorden und Kirchen zerstören?“, fragt einer der Soldaten in dem Gotteshaus.




    Bürgerkrieg in Syrien: Eingekesselt in Homs - taz.de

  4. #1774
    Avatar von AlbaJews

    Registriert seit
    02.06.2011
    Beiträge
    7.744
    LiveLeak.com - Syrian rebels beheads bishop François Murad

    Al-Nusra köpft katholischen Priester, ich bereue es das ich die scheisse angeschaut habe, diese Menschen sind einfach krank, Allah wird diesen Heuchlern niemals den Sieg geben, wenigstens etwas gutes.

  5. #1775
    Avatar von Hundz Gemajni

    Registriert seit
    25.08.2006
    Beiträge
    13.015
    Zitat Zitat von AlbaJews Beitrag anzeigen
    LiveLeak.com - Syrian rebels beheads bishop François Murad

    Al-Nusra köpft katholischen Priester, ich bereue es das ich die scheisse angeschaut habe, diese Menschen sind einfach krank, Allah wird diesen Heuchlern niemals den Sieg geben, wenigstens etwas gutes.
    Ohne es angeschaut zu haben, aber warum postest du den Link?

  6. #1776
    Avatar von AlbaJews

    Registriert seit
    02.06.2011
    Beiträge
    7.744
    Zitat Zitat von QQ LELE Beitrag anzeigen
    Ohne es angeschaut zu haben, aber warum postest du den Link?
    Um die andere Medaille zu zeigen, nicht nur Assad ist böse.

  7. #1777
    Avatar von Hundz Gemajni

    Registriert seit
    25.08.2006
    Beiträge
    13.015
    Zitat Zitat von AlbaJews Beitrag anzeigen
    Um die andere Medaille zu zeigen, nicht nur Assad ist böse.
    Das sollte jeder halbwegs gebildeter Mensch wissen.

  8. #1778
    Avatar von AlbaJews

    Registriert seit
    02.06.2011
    Beiträge
    7.744
    Zitat Zitat von QQ LELE Beitrag anzeigen
    Das sollte jeder halbwegs gebildeter Mensch wissen.
    Sollte.

  9. #1779
    Avatar von Ibrišimović

    Registriert seit
    30.11.2005
    Beiträge
    3.564
    Hab jetzt schon viele Enthauptungsvideos aus Syrien gesehen, wie sie sich immer mit ihrem "Allahu akbar" pushen, während sie Leute stümperhaft köpfen. Demletzt eins gesehen, da haben die ewig gebraucht bis sie ihn abgetrennt hatten und das oberperverse ist auch noch, wenn man sieht, wie sie alle mit ihren Smartphones filmen..... da kommt mir sowas von die Galle hoch, möge sie Gott alle mit Krebs bestrafen.

  10. #1780
    Avatar von DZEKO

    Registriert seit
    09.08.2009
    Beiträge
    55.010

    AW: Syrien

    Wer solche Videos sehen mag bitte per PN anfragen.

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