BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Ergebnis 1 bis 6 von 6

Kosovo Serbs Announce Break With Belgrade

Erstellt von Albanesi, 23.07.2005, 17:45 Uhr · 5 Antworten · 390 Aufrufe

  1. #1

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    5.698

    Kosovo Serbs Announce Break With Belgrade

    Kosovo Serbs Announce Break With Belgrade

    Serbia’s policy of urging Kosovo Serbs to boycott the Kosovo government is creating resentment among local Serb leaders. By Arben Qirezi in Pristina (BCR No 566, 22-Jul-05) A gap has opened up between the Serbian government and Kosovo Serb leaders after one of the latter said he will join the Albanian-dominated local assembly in defiance of Belgrade. Serbia’s position is clear-cut: no participation without extra guarantees. As Serbia’s president, Boris Tadic, put it recently, "Serbia is asking for a more active policy by the international community and for guarantees for the Serbs from the local authorities. Without this, Serb participation in Kosovo institutions would make no sense.”

    Tadic was speaking after meeting the UN envoy, Kai Aide, who vainly urged Serbia's leadership to start persuading Kosovo Serbs to join local institutions.

    But Oliver Ivanovic, head of the Serbian List for Kosovo and Metohija, SLKM, now says he fears that Serbia is using the issue as a political football, to the detriment of the real interests of Kosovo Serbs.

    “Everything is being done … for internal wrangling,” he announced this week. “These calculations may cost a lot to the more than 100,000 Serbs who have decided to stay in Kosovo." Ivanovic announced that his group will now take up the eight seats that it holds, but has not occupied, in the Kosovo Assembly, and will formally announce a decision to join the government over the next few days.

    The announcement marks a sharp break with SLKM policy, which was earlier characterised by a willingness to leave all the big policy decisions to Belgrade.

    On the urging of the Serbian government, most Kosovo Serbs boycotted the elections to the assembly last October.

    With less than 1,000 Serb voters casting their ballot, the SLKM and the Civic List Serbia, CLS, took the 10 seats that had been allocated to the Serb community, irrespective of the number of votes cast. The CLS, with two of the 10 seats, led by Nebojsa Petkovic, immediately joined the assembly and took over the ministry of returns and communities.

    With the Kosovo government focusing hard on returnee programmes, Petkovic found himself managing the biggest single ministerial budget, worth 14 million euro in 2005 alone. The ministry of agriculture, which is also reserved for Kosovo Serbs, remained without a minister, however, because the SLKM decided to continue with the Belgrade-inspired boycott. Although the UN’s framework for governing the territory, the Constitutional Framework of Kosovo, says representatives who fail to appear at assembly meetings for more than six months should be dismissed, the UN mission in Kosovo, UNMIK, declined to enforce this provision, clearly hoping the SLKM would eventually change its mind. In the meantime, Petkovic criticised UNMIK for giving so much importance to the SLKM, instead of allowing the CLS, "which has shown good will to work within the institutions, to take over the remaining vacant seats in the assembly and the government". Ivanovic's previous position, that the SLKM could not make any decision on participation in Kosovo institutions without Serbia’s support, was a calculated tactic, some observers said, aimed at maximising the Serb position and at ensuring Belgrade was granted a major role in any final-status negotiations.

    "Belgrade counted that a continuous boycott of Kosovo Serbs would enforce the argument that Serbs need their own self-government within Kosovo,” said Bekim Kastrati, a political analyst from Pristina.

    “On the other hand, as a Belgrade-sponsored political group, the SLKM lacked the internal strength to take decisions on its own."

    But Ivanovic’s latest statements suggest these calculations have lost much of their original force.

    Serbia suffered a major loss of prestige last year after the international community rejected its plan to set up five autonomous Serb regions in Kosovo, linked to each other by corridors. In the ongoing deadlock, a view has clearly emerged in Kosovo that Belgrade is now simply reinforcing its own position at the expense of the Kosovo Serbs, whose dependence on Belgrade has left them without a credible voice. Arben Qirezi is IWPR/BIRN Kosovo editor.

    http://www.iwpr.net/index.pl?archiv...7_566_1_eng.txt

  2. #2

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    5.698


    Wenn sich die Serben in Kosovo mitanpacken wollen und ihre Politik ernst meinen und sich nicht von Belgrad beirren lassen ....willkommen in der kosovarischen Gesellschaft.

  3. #3
    Mare-Car
    Die auch in Zukunft nur ein Traum bleiben wird.

  4. #4
    Avatar von lupo-de-mare

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    11.988
    Zitat Zitat von Mare-Car
    Die auch in Zukunft nur ein Traum bleiben wird.
    Die NATO und Belgrad haben jetzt schon Abkommen geschlossen u.a. freie Durchfahrt, denn das die Kosovaren Mafia dort wieder durchdrehen wird, sollte jedem klar sein.

  5. #5

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    1.190
    IWPR.....??????

    HAHAHAHA.... Gruesst recht schoen euren....GEORGE SOROS....und seine Propagandaabteilung von IWPR....!!!!

    Soviel zu eurem Bericht....!!!

  6. #6
    Avatar von lupo-de-mare

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    11.988
    Zitat Zitat von Partibrejker
    IWPR.....??????

    HAHAHAHA.... Gruesst recht schoen euren....GEORGE SOROS....und seine Propagandaabteilung von IWPR....!!!!

    Soviel zu eurem Bericht....!!!
    Der ICG ist wohl das wichtigste Sprach Rohr von diesem Mafia und Terror Aufbau Helfer Georg Soros.
    Hier der neueste Propanda Report

    Kosovo after Haradinaj
    Europe Report N°163
    26 May 2005

    This report is also available in Russian, Albanian and Serbian.

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Kosovo Albanian society showed welcome maturity in recent months as it reacted calmly to the indictment for war crimes of Prime Minister Haradinaj and the anniversary of the March 2004 riots. However, Kosovo Albanian politics remain fractious and worse. Mutual distrust between the two leading parties, President Rugova's Democratic League of Kosovo (LDK) and Hashim Thaci's Democratic Party of Kosovo (PDK), is distracting politicians from seeking a consensus position for the approaching negotiations on final status. Recent weeks have seen an escalation in tension between them so bitter that it risks spiralling into killings. It is vital that the international community, as it assesses Kosovo's readiness for final status talks, use the next important months to do a great deal more to help build institutions for genuine self-government. Otherwise, Kosovo is likely to return to instability sooner rather than later and again put at risk all that has been invested in building a European future for the Western Balkans.

    Even though the international community is beginning to move Kosovo toward some form of independence, the escalation of internal political conflict and the April 2005 murder of former Prime Minister Haradinaj's younger brother show that serious risks of instability remain. Kosovo Albanians' present peace with the international community is highly conditional, resting on renewed optimism about imminent movement on final status and upon some progress in consolidation of a sense of ownership of institutions resulting from the more vigorous and effective government that Haradinaj ran before he was forced to step down and answer charges in The Hague. Most areas are calm, but Haradinaj's home municipality of Decan is a tinderbox, full of angry armed groups, and isolated from the rest of Kosovo. The next security watershed will be the Tribunal's decision whether to grant bail so the former prime minister can return home while awaiting trial.

    Forced into opposition by the coalition of Rugova's LDK and Haradinaj's Alliance for the Future of Kosovo (AAK), the PDK, the main successor of the Kosovo Liberation Army, may prefer to derail the government rather than act responsibly by helping to forge a joint position on final status. Whether its politicians can cooperate over the next months will have far-reaching consequences for Kosovo's ability to function as a state once the current heavy international presence is converted into a lighter monitoring mission. There is a real prospect of a ruinous factionalism similar to that which has developed in Albania.

    Kosovo's rival parties have to work consciously to avoid this scenario or they will bear responsibility for the failure to consolidate statehood. The UN Mission (UNMIK) has a responsibility too -- transfer of power and preparation of Kosovo for final status must go beyond a mere letting go of its six-year holding operation. It must use the period leading up to and including negotiations on final status to take the vigorous action necessary to pave the way for genuine self-government. UNMIK has put aside its inertia but appears to be following more of an escape strategy than a state-building strategy. Much of the work being rushed through at present to get a result in the mid-year standards review is of questionable quality, not likely to stand the test of time. Problems that will come back to haunt Kosovo like toleration of widespread corruption and of powerful, unaccountable partisan political intelligence agencies are being swept under the carpet rather than addressed.

    RECOMMENDATIONS

    Respecting Security:

    1. UNMIK should adopt a more credible and open information policy regarding security matters, in particular by moving vigorously to close down the political party intelligence structures about which it has been claiming it has no knowledge.

    2. Kosovo's political party leaders should cooperate with police investigations, notably:

    (a) President Rugova should respond to police requests to interview him about the 15 March 2005 bomb attack against his motorcade; and

    (b) PDK leader Hashim Thaci and General Secretary Jakup Krasniqi should provide evidence and witnesses to substantiate the dossier of accusations against LDK officials they gave to UNMIK.

    http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=3474&l=1

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Let's Break-Adil geht ..
    Von Kusho06 im Forum Balkan im TV
    Antworten: 15
    Letzter Beitrag: 23.05.2006, 22:06
  2. Break-Dance
    Von Kusho06 im Forum Rakija
    Antworten: 47
    Letzter Beitrag: 08.04.2006, 20:53
  3. Kosovo Serbs Announce Break With Belgrade
    Von Albanesi im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 0
    Letzter Beitrag: 23.07.2005, 17:44
  4. Serbs block Kosovo bridge opening
    Von Albanesi im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 6
    Letzter Beitrag: 15.06.2005, 20:06