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Massive Proteste in Bosnien u. Herzegowina - JMBG

Erstellt von Dolls, 11.06.2013, 14:53 Uhr · 267 Antworten · 15.250 Aufrufe

  1. #201
    Avatar von Kampfposter

    Registriert seit
    20.11.2011
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    3.820
    Zitat Zitat von Garfield Beitrag anzeigen
    Sorry bin selber ein Thor Steinar HercegBosna ZA DOM SPTREMI Kroate und finde deine Schilderungen total übertrieben.. Apratheid..
    Mein Beileid für deine hängengebliebene politische Option, vor allem was du mit Thor Steiner andeutest, deswegen unterscheiden sich unsere politischen Ansichten auch so diametral.

    So und nun geh weiter blümchen Ärsche lecken aber nicht auf meine kosten, fascho.

  2. #202
    Avatar von Buntovnik

    Registriert seit
    31.03.2012
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    2.826
    Hier im BF wird ja so manchem Staat Apartheid angedichtet

  3. #203

    Registriert seit
    04.05.2013
    Beiträge
    1.152
    Zitat Zitat von Kampfposter Beitrag anzeigen
    Mein Beileid für deine hängengebliebene politische Option, vor allem was du mit Thor Steiner andeutest, deswegen unterscheiden sich unsere politischen Ansichten auch so diametral.

    So und nun geh weiter blümchen Ärsche lecken aber nicht auf meine kosten, fascho.

    Wann hast du das leztze mal gef... ?

  4. #204
    Avatar von Bosanski_Inat

    Registriert seit
    08.06.2013
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    167
    Machen wir jetzt bitte nicht alles kaputt.
    Dolls hat alles so schön gemacht hier

  5. #205
    Avatar von Bosanski Vojnik

    Registriert seit
    22.08.2010
    Beiträge
    667
    Zitat Zitat von Bambi Beitrag anzeigen
    Meine Eltern waren auch Kriegsflüchtlinge und wir bekamen alle ne dauerhafte Aufenthaltsgenehmigung. Das war natürlich an Voraussetzungen gekoppelt wie dass man sein Einkommen selbst bestreitet, nicht straffällig wird etc. Aber dass man als Kriegsflüchtling in jedem Falle ausgewiesen wurde, kann nicht ganz stimmen.
    Als Kriegsflüchtling gekommen sind viele.
    aber ob sie es waren ist eine andere Sache..

  6. #206
    Avatar von Dolls

    Registriert seit
    17.03.2010
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    4.903
    Zitat Zitat von Bosanski_Inat Beitrag anzeigen
    Machen wir jetzt bitte nicht alles kaputt.
    Dolls hat alles so schön gemacht hier


    Lass sie doch zeigen wer sie sind

    - - - Aktualisiert - - -



























    Einige Bilder vom gestrigen Konzert für JMBG in Tuzla


    demonstranti-na-podu.jpg

    transparenti.jpg

    protesti_soni_trg_muzicari.jpg

  7. #207
    Avatar von DZEKO

    Registriert seit
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    55.011

    AW: Massive Proteste in Bosnien u. Herzegowina - JMBG

    Anscheinend sind 77% der RS Bürger Pro JMBG Demonstrationen.

    Republika Srpska: 77 posto građana podržava proteste za JMBG

    U Federaciji, podrška je veća, iznosi skoro 95 posto. Manje od 5 posto ne podržava proteste. U Republici Srpskoj 77 posto ispitanih slaže se sa protestima. 18 posto ispitanih je protiv njih.

    U Republici Srpskoj, 69 posto ispitanih mišljenja je da su protesti protiv svih bh. političara. Sedam posto ispitanih smatra da su demonstracije bile protiv parlamentarnih zastupnika.

    12 posto građana u RS-u misli da su protesti protiv predstavnika srpskog naroda, 3 posto protiv predstavnika hrvatskog a 2 posto protiv predstavnika bošnjačkog naroda, prenijela je Al Jazeera Balkans.

    http://www.24sata.info/mobile/mobile...e-za-jmbg.html

  8. #208
    Avatar von Dolls

    Registriert seit
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    4.903
    In the shadow of events in Turkey and Brazil, Bosnians have been taking to the streets. For over a week, citizens of the small Balkan country have been protesting their leaders’ failure to pass a new law on citizen identification numbers, leaving babies unable to travel for medical care. Milana Knezevic writes



    As is often the case in Bosnia, this seemingly straightforward task soon took on an ethnic element. Serbian parliamentarians wanted the number to recognize the internal geographic split between the Serb majority entity Republika Srpska and the the Croat Bosniak majority Bosnian Federation. Their Croat and Bosniak counterparts disagree.


    The political stalemate means that since February newborns in Bosnia have not been able to get passports.
    Last Wednesday, activists organised a car blockade of parliament in Sarajevo. The impromptu show of support for Belmina Ibrisevic, a seriously ill infant who could not travel abroad to get treatment, quickly grew until several thousand people surrounded the building, trapping parliamentarians inside.
    “It [the protest] is about those few brave citizens who decided to take a risk and react. Others came, following basic instinct and their conscience”, says Sarajevo-based activist and political commentator Nedim Jahic.


    On Monday, the leaderless “babylution” took the shape of a tribute to baby Berina Hamidovic, who died at a hospital in Belgrade. After weeks of pleading with authorities, her parents decided to take her across the border without a passport.


    “My Berina has died, because to Bosnian authorities she wasn’t alive”, father Emir told local press.


    On Tuesday, some of Bosnia’s biggest music acts stepped onto a makeshift stage outside parliament. Behind them, projected onto the parliament building, loomed the image of a giant pacifier in the shape of defiant fist. It is estimated some 10,000 people gathered to see the show. Meanwhile, citizens of Tuzla, Mostar, and other cities have also organised demonstrations under the banner of “JMBG”, the name of the ID law. The official facebook page has 22,000 likes and counting, where photos, videos and articles are widely shared. People from across the world have tweeted and facebooked messages of support, as have some of the biggest stars of the region. Combined, this makes for a remarkable, country-wide wave of political expression not seen for years.
    This is not only time Bosnia’s leaders have been unwilling and unable to make important decisions. The complex system of ethnicity-based quotas and vetoes implemented with the 1995 Dayton peace agreement to accommodate Bosniak, Croat and Serb leaders, has led to political paralysis on a number of occasions.
    “The timing was important was an important reason for people reacting the way they have in this particular case”, explains Florian Bieber, Professor in South East European Studies at the University of Graz, and a leading expert on post-war Bosnia. “Frustration had been accumulating over time, especially with the deteriorating economic situation. This is an issue that affects everyone, not only one group, which helped galvanised support across the population. It also has a human face. It’s not about losing money; it’s about lack of ID numbers risking children’s lives”.


    The size and scope of the protests is not to be underestimated. The feeling of unity invites comparisons to the anti-war protests of 1992. Much has particularly been made of seemingly cross-ethnic nature of the demonstrations. But while it is certainly the case that Serbs, Croats and Bosniaks alike have been taking part and expressing solidarity, the movement has largely been confined to the Bosnian Federation. Recent student protests in Banja Luka, while likely inspired by the nationwide atmosphere of protest, have distanced themselves from the message of JMBG.


    “Today’s protests are also important, however, without significant number of citizens from Republika Srpska, it is hard to expect real change. In todays’ conditions and political structure of Bosnia and Herzegovina, you cannot expect to have change and efficient pressure without relevant support coming from both entities, which is rarely the case”, Jahic concedes.


    Politicians have also been unwilling to cooperate thus far. Some parliamentarians have refused to come back to work citing security fears, while Bakir Izetbegovic, the Bosnian representative to the three-member presidency, has urged people not to take to the streets.
    Despite this, the movement rumbles on. The protesters have given the politicians the deadline of 30th June to resolve the ID number debacle, and Jahic says the first priority is to “see results on the directly addressed issue.” However, protesters have also demanded that politicians, who earn approximately six times the national average, take a 30% wage cut and place the money in a fund for Bosnians who need medical treatment abroad. This appears to invoke the frustration and anger about the general state of the country helping drive the scale of the protests.



    While Bieber is uncertain whether the demands will be met and the elites will change their ways, he does believe this could be a turning point for the country.


    “Even if they fail, the protests have made citizens feel they can achieve something”.



    Bosnians protest as political row leads to infant death | Index on Censorship

  9. #209
    Avatar von DZEKO

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    AW: Massive Proteste in Bosnien u. Herzegowina - JMBG


  10. #210
    Avatar von Azrak

    Registriert seit
    18.08.2008
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    Aus Frankfurt:
    Anhang 41771Anhang 41772Anhang 41773

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