BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Ergebnis 1 bis 6 von 6

Menschenrechte, Morde und Korruption auf dem Balkan

Erstellt von lupo-de-mare, 12.03.2005, 18:57 Uhr · 5 Antworten · 949 Aufrufe

  1. #1
    Avatar von lupo-de-mare

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    11.988

    Menschenrechte, Morde und Korruption auf dem Balkan

    Die neuen Menschenrechts Reports, geben hier allen Nationalistischen Seiten, genug Munition, damit ihr Eure Kriege gezielt mit besten Quellen weiter führen könnt.

    Ich wünsche viel Spass!

    --------------------------------------------------------------
    Keine Politischen Morde in Serbien im Report 2004
    Aber viele andere Probleme, vor allem auch im Kosovo

    Serbia and Montenegro

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005.............

    In March, there were a number of incidents of societal violence and discrimination against religious minorities following widespread anti-Serb violence in Kosovo. Violence and discrimination against women and ethnic minorities were problems. Trafficking in women and children remained a problem which the Government took steps to address.

    RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

    Section 1
    Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

    a. Arbitrary or Unlawful Deprivation of Life

    There were no political killings; however, on May 15, police shot and killed an armed poacher along the administrative boundary line with Kosovo. Police, accompanied by a representative of the NATO-led Kosovo force (KFOR), investigated the shooting and determined that it was justified.

    The trial of the suspects in the March 2003 assassination of Prime Minister Djindjic was ongoing at year's end. Djindjic was allegedly killed by members of the Red Berets--an autonomous state security police unit from the era of former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) President Slobodan Milosevic--in collusion with the Zemun organized crime clan.

    There were some developments in police investigations of political killings from previous years. The trial of two former police officers and five others (including two who remained at large) for the 2002 killing of former Belgrade police chief Bosko Buha was dismissed in November for lack of evidence.

    http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/41706.htm

    Viele Probleme in Mazedonien, durch Extremisten beider Seiten. U.a. in Bitola durch Anschläge auf Moscheen, oder Extremistische Terroristen der NLA-ANA-AKSH. Totale Korruption in Mazedonien!

    Macedonia

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005.................
    Macedonia

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005
    ..............................
    Macedonia

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005....................

    http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/41695.htm


    Kriminelle Aktionen des früheren Geheimdienstes SHIK von Salih Berisha wurden enttarnt, inklusive Morde. Die Entführung von Ziso Kristopulli and Remzi Hoxh, führte erst jetzt zu Festnahmen der damaligen hohen Geheimdienst Offiziere.



    Albania

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005.....................


    Albania

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005

    Albania is a republic with a multiparty Parliament, and a Prime Minister and a President both elected by Parliament. The Prime Minister heads the Government; the Presidency is a largely ceremonial position with limited executive power. In 2003, local elections were held throughout the country, which were judged to be an improvement over previous elections, with only a few isolated incidents of irregularities and violence. The Constitution provides for an independent judiciary; however, corruption and political pressure limited its ability to function independently and efficiently.

    Local police units report to the Ministry of Public Order and are responsible principally for internal security. The military forces have a special 151-person "commando" unit, which operates in an antiterrorist role under the Minister of Defense. During times of domestic crisis, the law allows the Minister of Public Order to request authority over this unit. The State Intelligence Service (SHISH) is responsible for both internal and external intelligence gathering and counterintelligence. Civilian authorities generally maintained effective control over the security forces. Some members of the security forces committed human rights abuses.

    The country had a mixed economy that was in transition from central economic planning to a free market system. The country continued to experience slow but steady economic progress; the economy grew by 6 percent. However, approximately 25 percent of the population of approximately 3.1 million lived below the poverty line. According to the Government, the unemployment rate was 15.2 percent; however, some unofficial reports put it as high as 22 percent. The average inflation was 3.2 percent and public sector wages increased by 10 percent.

    The Government generally respected the human rights of its citizens; however, there were serious problems in several areas. Police beat and abused suspects, detainees, and prisoners. Prison conditions remained poor. The police occasionally arbitrarily arrested and detained persons, and prolonged pretrial detention was a problem. Official impunity was a problem. The Government occasionally infringed on citizens' privacy rights. Political interference in the media occurred less frequently than in previous years. Police reportedly used excessive force against protestors. Individual vigilante action, mostly related to traditional blood feuds, resulted in some killings and an atmosphere of fear in some areas of the country. Societal violence and discrimination against women and children were serious problems. Societal discrimination against Roma, the Egyptian community, and homosexuals persisted. Child labor was a problem. Trafficking in persons remained a problem, which the Government took some steps to address.

    RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

    Section 1
    Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including

    Freedom From:

    a. Arbitrary or Unlawful Deprivation of Life

    There were no political killings; however, security forces killed one person during the year.

    In July, Erigert Ceka, a 17-year-old minor, died as a result of being beaten by police while in detention. As a result of the death, the prosecutor initiated criminal proceedings against two police guards who were charged with committing "arbitrary actions." In November, one guard was sentenced to a 6-month prison term for committing arbitrary actions in violation of the law while escorting detainees, and in December, the other police guard was sentenced to an 8-month prison term for violating the rules of guard service under the military code and misuse of duty. The cases were being appealed at year's end; however, the court did not hold anyone accountable for Ceka's death.

    Unlike in previous years, there were no reported deaths due to land mines. However, there were six deaths from mine-related accidents including a cluster bomb in a training facility that killed two and injured several, and a antitank mine that killed four others, three of whom were children.

    The country continued to experience high levels of violent crime. Many killings continued to occur as the result of individual or clan vigilante actions connected to traditional "blood feuds" or criminal gang conflicts. According to the Ministry of Public Order, at least 10 individuals were killed during the year in blood feuds, which are based on the medieval Code of Lek Dukagjini (the kanun), which was practiced by individuals particularly in the northern part of the country. Under the kanun, only adult males are acceptable targets for blood feuds; however, women and children often were killed or injured in the attacks. As a result of blood feuds, during the year, 670 families were self-imprisoned, 650 families accepted legal procedures rather than personal vendettas for resolving the conflict, and 54 families were living under protection outside of the country; 160 children were prevented from attending school due to fear of revenge, of which 73 were considered to be in serious danger. This was a decrease from 2003 when it was estimated that there were 1,370 families self-imprisoned at home and 711 children prevented from attending school due to fear of revenge. Land property conflicts and issues related to human trafficking remained the main reasons forcing families to enter into blood feuds. In August, Emin Spahija, the head of the Non-Government organization (NGO) Peace Missionaries League that worked exclusively on blood feud issues, was murdered near his house in the city of Shkodra. Police have not apprehended any suspects in the murder.

    Blood feud cases were adjudicated in the Court of Serious Crimes. Cases of blood killings carry a sentence of 20 years or life imprisonment. Although blood feud prosecution rates were not available, estimates indicated that 60 to 65 percent of all cases were brought to court and nearly all of them ended up at the appellate level.

    b. Disappearance

    There were no reports of politically motivated disappearances.

    Three former officials of the SHISH, who were arrested in 2003 in connection with the kidnapping of Ziso Kristopulli and Remzi Hoxha in 1995, were released (one in 2003 and two in May) for lack of evidence and the case was suspended. Although Kristopulli was eventually released, the whereabouts of Hoxha remained unknown.

    Human rights groups, including the Albanian Helsinki Committee (AHC) and the Albanian Human Rights Group (AHRG), have questioned the release of the SHISH officials and the suspension of the disappearance case. In November, the NGOs organized a press event and Amnesty International wrote a letter to the Prime Minister requesting that the case be reopened. No actions have taken place so far.

    c. Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

    The Constitution prohibits such actions; however, the police at times beat and tortured suspects. The AHC and the AHRG continued to report that police forces nationwide used torture and inhumane or excessive treatment; however, both noted that the number of cases decreased during the year. According to the AHRG, most mistreatment took place at the time of arrest or initial detention. Roma and members of the Egyptian community were particularly vulnerable to police abuse (see Section 5).

    In February, according to the AHRG, Niko Puriqi accused the Permeti Chief of Criminal Police of beating him during pretrial detention. The police medical examiner verified Puriqi's allegations. Puriqi initially was accused of theft, although the police later dismissed the charges. In March, the Chief of Criminal Police received a warning.

    Trafficking in Persons

    The law criminalizes trafficking in persons and provides penalties for traffickers; however, trafficking in persons, particularly women and children, remained a problem. Police corruption and involvement in trafficking was a problem.

    According to the Criminal Code, the penalties for human trafficking for sexual exploitation or forced labor are: Trafficking in persons (5 to 15 years in prison); trafficking of women for prostitution (7 to 15 years in prison); and trafficking in minors (15 to 20 years in prison). Aggravating circumstances, such as kidnapping or death, can increase the severity of the sentence to a maximum term of life in prison.

    In February, Parliament approved the addition of fines to the existing penalties: Those convicted of exploitation for prostitution of a minor are fined $4,000 to $6,000 (400,000 to 600,000 lek); for women, the fine is $3,000 to $6,000 (300,000 to 600,000 lek). In addition, the amended Penal Code states that any government official or public servant convicted of exploitation for prostitution faces 125 percent of the standard penalty. In October, Parliament approved a new law that mandates the sequestration and confiscation of assets if their source comes from organized crime and trafficking.

    http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/41666.htm


    Da wird vor allem ebenso um geklaute Wohnungen der JNA gestritten, oder gegen korrupte, kriminelle Politische Figuren wird keine Anklage erhoben. Frauen Handel trotz Verbot ist ein grosses Problem und Politiker sind darin verwickelt. (wie überall)

    Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005.................
    Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2004
    Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
    February 28, 2005................................

    Trafficking in women for purposes of sexual exploitation was a serious problem (see Section 5, Trafficking).

    Prostitution is illegal. Pimping is considered a major crime, but working as a prostitute or solicitation are minor offenses punishable by a fine only. Police raids on bars and brothels have driven prostitution underground and it frequently took place in private apartments or on an incall and outcall basis. More local women were working as prostitutes, and single mothers or other vulnerable women, particularly from economically depressed rural areas, were at higher risk for recruitment by pimps during the year. NGOs who work on women's rights issues oppose the legalization of prostitution, which was proposed by some politicians but never approved in Parliament.
    ...........................

    http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/41673.htm

  2. #2
    Mare-Car
    Zusammenfassend kann man sagen, ohne Albaner, keine Probleme.

  3. #3

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    5.698
    Zitat Zitat von Mare-Car
    Zusammenfassend kann man sagen, ohne Albaner, keine Probleme.

    HAHAHAHAHA an deinen Aussagen sieht man ganz genau , das ihr Serben noch sehr unzivilisiert seid !!

  4. #4
    Avatar von lupo-de-mare

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    11.988
    Zitat Zitat von Albanesi
    Zitat Zitat von Mare-Car
    Zusammenfassend kann man sagen, ohne Albaner, keine Probleme.

    HAHAHAHAHA an deinen Aussagen sieht man ganz genau , das ihr Serben noch sehr unzivilisiert seid !!
    Also über Serbien steht auch genug Negatives drinnen, in diesen Reports.

  5. #5
    Mare-Car
    Zitat Zitat von Albanesi
    Zitat Zitat von Mare-Car
    Zusammenfassend kann man sagen, ohne Albaner, keine Probleme.

    HAHAHAHAHA an deinen Aussagen sieht man ganz genau , das ihr Serben noch sehr unzivilisiert seid !!
    Achja?
    Lies dir mal die Reports durch, und achte genau darauf, wo welche Probleme sind!
    In Serbien: Kosovo, Drogen und Menschenschmuggel, Menschenrechtsverletzungen, Vertreibung, Morde, wer machts? Albaner!
    In Mazedonien, im Nordne und Westen, Menschenschmuggel und diverses anderes, wer ist schuld? Albaner.
    IHR seid die Unruhestifter und der Problemherd des ganzen Balkan.

  6. #6
    Avatar von lupo-de-mare

    Registriert seit
    14.07.2004
    Beiträge
    11.988
    Zitat Zitat von Mare-Car
    Zitat Zitat von Albanesi
    Zitat Zitat von Mare-Car
    Zusammenfassend kann man sagen, ohne Albaner, keine Probleme.

    HAHAHAHAHA an deinen Aussagen sieht man ganz genau , das ihr Serben noch sehr unzivilisiert seid !!
    Achja?
    Lies dir mal die Reports durch, und achte genau darauf, wo welche Probleme sind!
    In Serbien: Kosovo, Drogen und Menschenschmuggel, Menschenrechtsverletzungen, Vertreibung, Morde, wer machts? Albaner!
    In Mazedonien, im Nordne und Westen, Menschenschmuggel und diverses anderes, wer ist schuld? Albaner.
    IHR seid die Unruhestifter und der Problemherd des ganzen Balkan.
    Die Albaner sind ohne Zweifel das Haupt Problem und die Korruption in den jeweiligen Regierungen. Oft verbunden mit dem Organisierten Verbrechen.

    aus

    http://www.politikforum.de/forum/sho...threadid=34077

    Hier mal die Mafia Verbindungen von Djingic sogar mit Reports von Janes.

    aus

    Janes Report: Serbische Regierung komplett korrupt

    Und immer wieder die Amerikanische Firma BAT:
    British American Tobacco.

    Alles vom Janes Report und damit entfällt jede Diskussion Grundlage.

    Das sind Vorlagen für die Internationalen Sicherheits Kreise.


    Serbian mafia threatens Balkan security

    Slobodan Milosevic is gone, but the problem of Serbian criminality and its relationship to the government remains. Well-informed sources in Yugoslavia's former republic of Macedonia, in which the old links to Belgrade are still very much alive at a personal level, told Foreign Report that Serbia remains critically unstable and, even in its reduced circumstances, still poses the key risk to Balkan security.

    This centrality is acknowledged by the USA, which has been keen to normalise relations with Serbia, partly in return for favours done during the Iraq war, with plans of underground facilities built by Yugoslavia for Saddam Hussein having been passed to Washington by the Belgrade government.

    Serbian territorial integrity is under challenge in Kosovo, Voyvodina and in its links to Montenegro. But the main difficulty Serbia faces is the maintenance of the rule of law in the face of organised crime and official corruption. Local mafias function as a 'grey government' influencing the visible administrations of the region with money and threats. Dusan Mihajlovic, Serbia's interior minister, recently said that the underworld criminals behind the murder of prime minister Zoran Djindjic are planning to kill a Serbian politician and a senior police official in the near future. He said that the police were only "half way" in their fight against organised crime and warned that the mafia was preparing to strike back from its retreats in neighbouring countries.

    Djindjic was seen by many Serbs as too servile before the West, one possible reason for his killing, but he was also rumoured to have made deals over his election with a mafia gang heavily involved in the profitable tobacco-smuggling trade.

    http://www.janes.com/security/inter...30717_1_n.shtml

    Dirty doings in the Balkans

    Unconfirmed but intriguing reports have reached us that organised criminals in the service of international terrorism are taking over the illicit trade in nuclear materials along the traditional Balkan smuggling route.

    The reports come from Russian, Serbian and US sources. These reports also speak of increased activity in the area by Islamic terrorists. Serbian and Russian sources say the terrorists have recently held a secret conference in Bosnia. They believe that a permanent terrorist cell is already functioning in Bosnia and that others are now being set up in Moldova.

    In an analysis of 14 cases of theft involving significant quantities of plutonium or weapons-grade uranium in the former Soviet Union, Scott Parrish of the Monterey Institute of International Studies detects the involvement of organised criminals in the Middle East and Asia. He believes the traffickers follow the traditional southern smuggling routes through Central Asia, the Caucasus and the Balkans. His conclusions are supported by Vladimir Orlov, a senior figure at Moscow's Centre for Policy Studies, who at a specialist conference recently described an unsuccessful attempt by the Russian mafia to obtain weapons of mass destruction for foreign interests.

    What is at stake here? There are an estimated 1,350 metric tons of plutonium and highly enriched uranium, enough for 40,000 nuclear weapons, stockpiled in Russia as well as in Kazakhstan, Belarus, Ukraine and Uzbekistan - in addition to potentially lethal material suitable for use in 'dirty bombs'.

    Several criminal-controlled Russian companies operate transport companies, say Phil Williams and Paul Woessner of the Ridgway Centre for International Security Studies. They argue in a discussion paper (published by the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London) that the familiarity of criminal enterprises with export licensing and their ability to corrupt officials and hide illicit cargo in legal consignments could all assist nuclear smuggling.

    http://www.janes.com/security/inter...30521_1_n.shtml

    Geldwäschevorwurf gegen serbische Regierungsspitze

    Belgrad - "Ich werde Beweise vorlegen, dass Mitglieder der serbischen Regierung korrupt und in Geldwäsche verwickelt sind", hatte Mladjen Dinkic, Gouverneur der serbischen Notenbank, mehrmals gedroht. Am Donnerstag präsentierte der junge Nationalbankchef vor laufenden Kameras ein Dokument der ungarischen Polizeiabteilung für den Kampf gegen das organisierte Verbrechen. Der Stab in Budapest verdächtigt die auf den Seychellen registrierte Firma Myron Sales Ltd und das in Zypern stationierte Unternehmen Lennay Control Ltd der Geldwäsche. Da serbisch-montenegrinische Staatsbürger in illegale Geschäfte mit diesen Firmen verwickelt sein sollen, wandte sich die ungarische Polizei an das Belgrader Innenministerium mit der Bitte um "relevante Informationen".

    Nutznießer der Millionenbeträge seien unter anderen Zoran Janusevic, Sicherheitsberater des serbischen Premiers, und Nemanja Kolesar, Direktor der Agentur für die Bankensanierung, erklärte Dinkic. Er beschuldigte Innenminister Dsan Mihajlovic, Beweise, die die Regierungsspitze belasten, absichtlich zurückgehalten zu haben, und forderte ihn zum Rücktritt auf.

    Das Innenministerium und der Staatssicherheitsdienst hätten seit der Wende vor drei Jahren in Serbien nichts gegen Wirtschaftsverbrechen getan, sagte Dinkic. Laut Hochrechnungen der Notenbank soll allein in diesem Jahr rund eine Milliarde Dollar aus "schmutzigen" Geschäften in Serbien "gewaschen" werden.

    Alle Betroffenen wiesen sofort empört jegliche Schuld von sich und kündigten Verleumdungsklagen gegen den Notenbankgouverneur an. Die zwei engsten Mitarbeiter des serbischen Premiers bestritten jedoch nicht, "Honorare" in der Höhe von rund 700.000 Euro kassiert zu haben. Für "Beratung", wie der Zweck der Einzahlung auf den Seychellen bezeichnet wurde.

    Die Resultate der Ermittlung würden noch lange auf sich warten lassen, sind sich Beobachter vor Ort einig. Von dem zugefügten Schaden würde sich die serbische Regierung jedoch kaum erholen können. Dinkic gilt als der "Schöpfer des stabilen Dinar". Als "Saubermann" und Experte genießt er hohes Ansehen in der Bevölkerung.

    Seine Tage als Notenbankgouverneurs scheinen aber gezählt. Ein seit Monaten vorbereitetes Gesetz über die Notenbank soll seine Ablösung im Parlament ermöglichen. Dinkic, Vizepräsident der zu Jahresbeginn gegründeten Partei G 17, behauptet, man wolle ihn ablösen, weil er es ablehnte, aus Devisenreserven, die die Stabilität des Dinars garantierten, die Wirtschaft und das Regierungsbudget zu kreditieren. Die während der Herrschaft von Slobodan Milosevic dank Monopolpositionen zu enormem Reichtum gekommene Nomenklatur habe sich nach der Wende etabliert, halte korrumpierte Politiker und Medien in ihren Händen und wolle an die Devisenreserven herankommen. (Quelle - Der Standard.at)

Ähnliche Themen

  1. UNDOC zu Korruption auf dem Balkan
    Von Grobar im Forum Kriminalität und Militär
    Antworten: 18
    Letzter Beitrag: 19.05.2011, 10:04
  2. Balkan: Hochburg der Korruption in Europa
    Von napoleon im Forum Kriminalität und Militär
    Antworten: 12
    Letzter Beitrag: 30.09.2008, 00:07
  3. Korruption in den West-Balkan Staaten
    Von Albanesi2 im Forum Wirtschaft
    Antworten: 2
    Letzter Beitrag: 19.08.2005, 19:00
  4. Menschenrechte, Morde und Korruption Al auf dem Balkan
    Von lupo-de-mare im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 0
    Letzter Beitrag: 12.03.2005, 18:56
  5. Antworten: 8
    Letzter Beitrag: 01.11.2004, 13:30