BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 1 von 16 1234511 ... LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 1 bis 10 von 154

Die Rolle der Juden im Bosnienkrieg 1992-1995

Erstellt von Bambi, 06.03.2011, 07:17 Uhr · 153 Antworten · 10.914 Aufrufe

  1. #1
    Avatar von Bambi

    Registriert seit
    16.06.2008
    Beiträge
    37.047

    Die Rolle der Juden im Bosnienkrieg 1992-1995

    Ich habe gerade im Buch "Ethnic Lobbies and US foreign Policy" von David und Rachel Anderson Paul folgenden Satz gelesen:

    In 1995 during the Balkan wars, a coalition of Muslim, Jewish and Arab American groups advocated for an end to the arms embargo against Bosnia, while Serb American organizations charged the American media with being biased against the Serb side of the conflict.
    Mehr steht dazu im Buch nicht, weil es allerlei Arten von ethnischen Lobbies betrachtet, nicht allein die jüdische, arabische, whatever. Nun könnte ich natürlich googeln oder in akademischen Datenbanken schauen, aber wozu gibt's denn das bf Also, wisst ihr etwas über jüdisches Engagement im Bosnienkrieg, egal in welcher Form? Ich meine jetzt nicht die bosnischen Juden, sondern die außerhalb, egal ob die in den USA (die sind auch im Text gemeint), Israel oder sonstwo.

  2. #2

    Registriert seit
    10.04.2010
    Beiträge
    664
    Israel Accepts 84 of Bosnia's Muslim Refugees


    Israel Accepts 84 of Bosnia's Muslim Refugees - NYTimes.com

  3. #3
    Avatar von Гуштер

    Registriert seit
    07.06.2010
    Beiträge
    16.274
    Sagt euch La Benevolencija was?
    Das ist eine jüdische Gemeinde in Sarajevo, die waren die Hauptinitianten. Sie haben sich mit den jüdischen Gemeinden Weltweit in Verbindung gesetzt um auf die Misere in Bosnien aufmerksam zu machen.

    Hab dazu vor einiger Zeit einen interessanten Artikel gelesen, mal sehe ob ich ihn finde.

  4. #4

    Registriert seit
    10.04.2010
    Beiträge
    664
    Zitat Zitat von Гуштер Beitrag anzeigen
    Sagt euch La Benevolencija was?
    Das ist eine jüdische Gemeinde in Sarajevo, die waren die Hauptinitianten. Sie haben sich mit den jüdischen Gemeinden Weltweit in Verbindung gesetzt um auf die Misere in Bosnien aufmerksam zu machen.

    Hab dazu vor einiger Zeit einen interessanten Artikel gelesen, mal sehe ob ich ihn finde.
    Die haben doch auch die Bevölkerung in Sarajevo massiv mit Medikamenten usw. unterstützt ?

  5. #5
    Avatar von Koma

    Registriert seit
    01.01.2007
    Beiträge
    21.136
    wartet ab bis der Dzeko mit frischen Infos kommt (hoffentlich nicht von 24sata)

  6. #6
    Avatar von Гуштер

    Registriert seit
    07.06.2010
    Beiträge
    16.274
    Zitat Zitat von Cevapcici Beitrag anzeigen
    Die haben doch auch die Bevölkerung in Sarajevo massiv mit Medikamenten usw. unterstützt ?
    Kann gut sein, ich weiss nur das viele Juden gemeinsam mit den Bosniaken in der Armee kämpften.

  7. #7
    Avatar von Bambi

    Registriert seit
    16.06.2008
    Beiträge
    37.047
    Zitat Zitat von Koma Beitrag anzeigen
    wartet ab bis der Dzeko mit frischen Infos kommt (hoffentlich nicht von 24sata)
    ob die dann so neutral ausfallen, steht auf nem anderen Blatt

  8. #8
    Avatar von Bambi

    Registriert seit
    16.06.2008
    Beiträge
    37.047
    Zitat Zitat von Гуштер Beitrag anzeigen
    Sagt euch La Benevolencija was?
    Das ist eine jüdische Gemeinde in Sarajevo, die waren die Hauptinitianten. Sie haben sich mit den jüdischen Gemeinden Weltweit in Verbindung gesetzt um auf die Misere in Bosnien aufmerksam zu machen.

    Hab dazu vor einiger Zeit einen interessanten Artikel gelesen, mal sehe ob ich ihn finde.
    wenn du den findest, gibts nen dicken Kuss, züchtig auf die Wange

  9. #9
    Avatar von Гуштер

    Registriert seit
    07.06.2010
    Beiträge
    16.274
    Hier der Artikel, auf englisch.

    The 1992-1995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina is remembered in many sad and different ways, but there are also shining examples of what faith really means and how to be a humanitarian.

    One of these examples is La Benevolencija, the Jewish community of Sarajevo. From the very beginning of the war, they made it very clear which side they were on - neither. At the risk of becoming a mutual enemy of all three of Bosnia's major religious groups (Muslims, Catholics, and Orthodox Christians) they chose to befriend them all.

    From the first day of the war, Bosnian Jews recognized the character of the conflict. They lobbied intensely to governments and organizations around the world to put an end to the genocide and bloodshed. Greta Ferusic, an Auschwitz survivor, deserves special mention in this regard.

    They also carried out a lot of humanitarian work. They brought water to bedridden Muslim grandmothers in Dobrinja, under shelling and sniper fire. They brought food to Catholic orphanages in Nedzarici, risking their own lives to bring it there. They operated soup kitchens and various other facilities that made life a little easier for the hundreds of thousands of people living in what would become the longest siege in the recorded history of mankind.

    One of the most selfless things they did resulted in the near total destruction of one of their most cherished landmarks. The Sephardic cemetery in Sarajevo is one of the oldest and largest still-in-use Sephardic cemeteries in the world, with numerous stone tombs that are unique to Bosnian Jews. They gave permission to those fighting to defend Sarajevo (basically the municipal police force and volunteers at first, later it grew to be considered a real army) permission to trench the cemetery and turn it into a defensive position. This in itself damaged the site, as did the countless attacks this defensive position attracted from those laying siege to the city. The community agreed to allow this because, had they not, several residential blocks would've been outside the defended area and open to full ethnic cleansing instead of "just" shelling and sniper fire. 74 people in this neighborhood survived the war, not one of them Jewish, because of this action.

    The Jewish community also lobbied the Israeli government to do something and that country agreed to accept more than 700 Muslim children. They were loaded onto buses, waved goodbye to their parents and families, and ended up travelling via Italy and Cyprus to northern Israel. Most of them returned after the war, as did most of Bosnia's Jews who fled to Israel, but some stayed and several even converted to Judaism. Israeli television networks have several times profiled one young Bosniak IDF soldier, an aspiring model, who converted to Judaism and opted to stay as a thank you for everything.

    The Jews also pushed for an end to the war tirelessly. Jakov Finci and Aleksandrija Avidan are most notable in this regard.

    Also, whenever the war had lost public interest around the world and we were in danger of being forgotten completely, the Jewish community would pull some huge stunt. For example, they offered to use the Sarajevo Haggadah (a priceless Haggadah, one of the oldest in the world, and one of the earliest known pieces of art to depict the earth as round) during Passover if American Jewish leaders would attend. Senator Joe Lieberman said he would be in Sarajevo if the Haggadah was on the table, and the siege returned to the international news for quite some time.

    They also arranged for humanitarian aid supplies, which were smuggled into Sarajevo through a 3 kilometer tunnel to free territory that they helped dig.

    After the war, they continued with this. They helped funded the reconstruction of the mosque in Hadzici village (near Sarajevo) and the replacement of the stained glass windows in Sarajevo's central Katedrala Srce Isusove (Heart of Jesus Cathedral).

    They pushed for reconciliation in a variety of ways, most notably by hosting interfaith forums and creating the Interfaith Council of Bosnia and Herzegovina, of which Jakov Finci (mentioned above) is President.

    To close this all off, I'll share a quote from Amira Ceric in Sarajevo Voices, daughter of an Islamic cleric in Bosnia, who was 14 when the war ended in 1995.

    "Aviva was perpetually in our basement. I can't imagine how she managed to find enough scraps for her own family and still bring to us, each and every day, the bread and eggs that she did. She used to play a game with my sister and I when the shelling started, I imagine it was an effort to keep us calm. She'd wipe a circle in the dust on the floor with her hand and lay marbles in the middle. Every impact made the marbles move a little more towards the edge of the circle and we had to predict which would leave the circle first. It was Aviva that showed up the day my mother was killed. She took my hands in her own and told me that the most beautiful sunset she had ever seen was in 1990 at the Auschwitz-Birkenau complex in Poland. She said it doesn't matter in what fashion God's children return to him, their passing is something that makes a place beautiful and special for those who are wise enough to see it. It is a thought I have not forgotten. Aviva was shot and killed by a sniper in the summer of 1995, just a few months before the Americans dropped half a dozen bombs on the aggressor positions and the siege was lifted. The sunsets in Sarajevo have been breathtaking ever since.

  10. #10
    Avatar von Indianer

    Registriert seit
    13.11.2010
    Beiträge
    24.882
    Zitat Zitat von Bambi Beitrag anzeigen
    ob die dann so neutral ausfallen, steht auf nem anderen Blatt
    man darf die hoffnung nie aufgeben, um evtl. hetzen zu können.

Seite 1 von 16 1234511 ... LetzteLetzte

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Antworten: 214
    Letzter Beitrag: 07.05.2011, 18:21
  2. ZloČini, masakri nad srbima u bih 1992-1995
    Von Gast829627 im Forum Kriminalität und Militär
    Antworten: 53
    Letzter Beitrag: 28.10.2010, 01:19
  3. 1992-1995
    Von st0lzer kr0ate im Forum Rakija
    Antworten: 63
    Letzter Beitrag: 23.06.2010, 19:34
  4. Bosna 1992-1995: Ne zaboravi, Ne oprost
    Von B0šNjAk im Forum Geschichte und Kultur
    Antworten: 22
    Letzter Beitrag: 31.12.2009, 03:53
  5. Die Massenverteibung von Serben in Bosnien 1992-1995
    Von SerbianBest im Forum Geschichte und Kultur
    Antworten: 19
    Letzter Beitrag: 24.11.2006, 17:44