BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Erweiterte Suche
Kontakt
BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen
Benutzerliste

Willkommen bei BalkanForum - das Forum für alle Balkanesen.
Seite 39 von 82 ErsteErste ... 2935363738394041424349 ... LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 381 bis 390 von 811

Interessanter Bericht über die EJRM

Erstellt von Sarantaporon, 21.05.2012, 00:05 Uhr · 810 Antworten · 23.669 Aufrufe

  1. #381
    economicos
    Naja, sag was du willst. Aber warum sagen/schreiben 95% der anerkannten Historiker das Gegenteil über Makedonien? In jeder Doku werden die als Hellenen bzw. Griechen bezeichnet

  2. #382
    Avatar von De_La_GreCo

    Registriert seit
    17.08.2008
    Beiträge
    23.768
    der junge kommt auch immer mit den selben quellen


    zoran siehs ein auf dieses ping pong spiel habe ich kein bock





    die historiker der welt sind sich einig

    von daher müssen wir gar nichts beweisen sondern lediglich du



    Open Letter to President Obama from World Scholars about Macedonia


    May 18, 2009

    The Honorable Barack Obama President, United States of America
    White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 
 Washington, DC 20500

    Dear President Obama,

    We, the undersigned scholars of Graeco-Roman antiquity, respectfully request that you intervene to clean up some of the historical debris left in southeast Europe by the previous U.S. administration. On November 4, 2004, two days after the re-election of President George W. Bush, his administration unilaterally recognized the “Republic of Macedonia.” This action not only abrogated geographic and historic fact, but it also has unleashed a dangerous epidemic of historical revisionism, of which the most obvious symptom is the misappropriation by the government in Skopje of the most famous of Macedonians, Alexander the Great. We believe that this silliness has gone too far, and that the U.S.A. has no business in supporting the subversion of history.
    Let us review facts. (The documentation for these facts [here in boldface] can be found attached and at: Obama - Documentation on Macedonia) The land in question, with its modern capital at Skopje, was called Paionia in antiquity. Mts. Barnous and Orbelos (which form today the northern limits of Greece) provide a natural barrier that separated, and separates, Macedonia from its northern neighbor. The only real connection is along the Axios/Vardar River and even this valley “does not form a line of communication because it is divided by gorges.” While it is true that the Paionians were subdued by Philip II, father of Alexander, in 358 B.C. they were not Macedonians and did not live in Macedonia. Likewise, for example, the Egyptians, who were subdued by Alexander, may have been ruled by Macedonians, including the famous Cleopatra, but they were never Macedonians themselves, and Egypt was never called Macedonia. Rather, Macedonia and Macedonian Greeks have been located for at least 2,500 years just where the modern Greek province of Macedonia is. Exactly this same relationship is true for Attica and Athenian Greeks, Argos and Argive Greeks, Corinth and Corinthian Greeks, etc. We do not understand how the modern inhabitants of ancient Paionia, who speak Slavic – a language introduced into the Balkans about a millennium after the death of Alexander – can claim him as their national hero. Alexander the Great was thoroughly and indisputably Greek. His great-great-great grandfather, Alexander I, competed in the Olympic Games where participation was limited to Greeks. Even before Alexander I, the Macedonians traced their ancestry to Argos, and many of their kings used the head of Herakles - the quintessential Greek hero - on their coins. Euripides – who died and was buried in Macedonia– wrote his play Archelaos in honor of the great-uncle of Alexander, and in Greek. While in Macedonia, Euripides also wrote the Bacchai, again in Greek. Presumably the Macedonian audience could understand what he wrote and what they heard. Alexander’s father, Philip, won several equestrian victories at Olympia and Delphi, the two most Hellenic of all the sanctuaries in ancient Greece where non-Greeks were not allowed to compete. Even more significantly, Philip was appointed to conduct the Pythian Games at Delphi in 346 B.C. In other words, Alexander the Great’s father and his ancestors were thoroughly Greek. Greek was the language used by Demosthenes and his delegation from Athens when they paid visits to Philip, also in 346 B.C.
    Another northern Greek, Aristotle, went off to study for nearly 20 years in the Academy of Plato. Aristotle subsequently returned to Macedonia and became the tutor of Alexander III. They used Greek in their classroom which can still be seen near Naoussa in Macedonia. Alexander carried with him throughout his conquests Aristotle’s edition of Homer’s Iliad. Alexander also spread Greek language and culture throughout his empire, founding cities and establishing centers of learning. Hence inscriptions concerning such typical Greek institutions as the gymnasium are found as far away as Afghanistan. They are all written in Greek. The questions follow: Why was Greek the lingua franca all over Alexander's empire if he was a "Macedonian"? Why was the New Testament, for example, written in Greek? The answers are clear: Alexander the Great was Greek, not Slavic, and Slavs and their language were nowhere near Alexander or his homeland until 1000 years later. This brings us back to the geographic area known in antiquity as Paionia. Why would the people who live there now call themselves Macedonians and their land Macedonia? Why would they abduct a completely Greek figure and make him their national hero? The ancient Paionians may or may not have been Greek, but they certainly became Greekish, and they were never Slavs.
    They were also not Macedonians. Ancient Paionia was a part of the Macedonian Empire. So were Ionia and Syria and Palestine and Egypt and Mesopotamia and Babylonia and Bactria and many more. They may thus have become “Macedonian” temporarily, but none was ever “Macedonia”. The theft of Philip and Alexander by a land that was never Macedonia cannot be justified. The traditions of ancient Paionia could be adopted by the current residents of that geographical area with considerable justification. But the extension of the geographic term “Macedonia” to cover southern Yugoslavia cannot. Even in the late 19th century, this misuse implied unhealthy territorial aspirations. The same motivation is to be seen in school maps that show the pseudo-greater Macedonia, stretching from Skopje to Mt. Olympus and labeled in Slavic. The same map and its claims are in calendars, bumper stickers, bank notes, etc., that have been circulating in the new state ever since it declared its independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Why would a poor land-locked new state attempt such historical nonsense? Why would it brazenly mock and provoke its neighbor? However one might like to characterize such behavior, it is clearly not a force for historical accuracy, nor for stability in the Balkans. It is sad that the United States of America has abetted and encouraged such behavior. We call upon you, Mr. President, to help - in whatever ways you deem appropriate - the government in Skopje to understand that it cannot build a national identity at the expense of historic truth. Our common international society cannot survive when history is ignored, much less when history is fabricated.

    Sincerely,



    NAME TITLE INSTITUTION Harry C. Avery, Professor of Classics, University of Pittsburgh (USA) Dr. Dirk Backendorf. Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur Mainz (Germany) Elizabeth C. Banks, Associate Professor of Classics (ret.), University of Kansas (USA) Luigi BESCHI, professore emerito di Archeologia Classica, Università di Firenze (Italy) Josine H. Blok, professor of Ancient History and Classical Civilization, Utrecht University (The Netherlands) Efrosyni Boutsikas, Lecturer of Classical Archaeology, University of Kent (UK) Keith Bradley, Eli J. and Helen Shaheen Professor of Classics, Concurrent Professor of History, University of Notre Dame (USA) Stanley M. Burstein, Professor Emeritus, California State University, Los Angeles (USA) Francis Cairns, Professor of Classical Languages, The Florida State University (USA) John McK. Camp II, Agora Excavations and Professor of Archaeology, ASCSA, Athens (Greece) Paul Cartledge, A.G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture, University of Cambridge (UK) Paavo Castrén, Professor of Classical Philology Emeritus, University of Helsinki (Finland) William Cavanagh, Professor of Aegean Prehistory, University of Nottingham (UK) Angelos Chaniotis, Professor, Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College, Oxford (UK) Paul Christesen, Professor of Ancient Greek History, Dartmouth College (USA) Ada Cohen, Associate Professor of Art History, Dartmouth College (USA) Randall M. Colaizzi, Lecturer in Classical Studies, University of Massachusetts-Boston (USA) Kathleen M. Coleman, Professor of Latin, Harvard University (USA) Michael B. Cosmopoulos, Ph.D., Professor and Endowed Chair in Greek Archaeology, University of Missouri-St. Louis (USA) Kevin F. Daly, Assistant Professor of Classics, Bucknell University (USA) Wolfgang Decker, Professor emeritus of sport history, Deutsche Sporthochschule, Köln (Germany) Luc Deitz, Ausserplanmässiger Professor of Mediaeval and Renaissance Latin, University of Trier (Germany), and Curator of manuscripts and rare books, National Library of Luxembourg (Luxembourg) Michael Dewar, Professor of Classics, University of Toronto (Canada) John D. Dillery, Associate Professor of Classics, University of Virginia (USA) Sheila Dillon, Associate Professor, Depts. of Art, Art History & Visual Studies and Classical Studies, Duke University (USA) Douglas Domingo-Forasté, Professor of Classics, California State University, Long Beach (USA) Pierre Ducrey, professeur honoraire, Université de Lausanne (Switzerland) Roger Dunkle, Professor of Classics Emeritus, Brooklyn College, City University of New York (USA) Michael M. Eisman, Associate Professor Ancient History and Classical Archaeology, Department of History, Temple University (USA) Mostafa El-Abbadi, Professor Emeritus, University of Alexandria (Egypt) R. Malcolm Errington, Professor für Alte Geschichte (Emeritus) Philipps- Universität, Marburg (Germany) Panagiotis Faklaris, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece) Denis Feeney, Giger Professor of Latin, Princeton University (USA) Elizabeth A. Fisher, Professor of Classics and Art History, Randolph-Macon College (USA) Nick Fisher, Professor of Ancient History, Cardiff University (UK) R. Leon Fitts, Asbury J Clarke Professor of Classical Studies, Emeritus, FSA, Scot., Dickinson Colllege (USA) John M. Fossey FRSC, FSA, Emeritus Professor of Art History (and Archaeology), McGill Univertsity, Montreal, and Curator of Archaeology, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (Canada) Robin Lane Fox, University Reader in Ancient History, New College, Oxford (UK) Rainer Friedrich, Professor of Classics Emeritus, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. (Canada) Heide Froning, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Marburg (Germany) Peter Funke, Professor of Ancient History, University of Muenster (Germany) Traianos Gagos, Professor of Greek and Papyrology, University of Michigan (USA) Robert Garland, Roy D. and Margaret B. Wooster Professor of the Classics, Colgate University, Hamilton NY (USA) Douglas E. Gerber, Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies, University of Western Ontario (Canada) Hans R. Goette, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Giessen (Germany); German Archaeological Institute, Berlin (Germany) Sander M. Goldberg, Professor of Classics, UCLA (USA) Erich S. Gruen, Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley (USA) Christian Habicht, Professor of Ancient History, Emeritus, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton (USA) Donald C. Haggis, Nicholas A. Cassas Term Professor of Greek Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) Judith P. Hallett, Professor of Classics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (USA) Prof. Paul B. Harvey, Jr. Head, Department of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, The Pennsylvania State University (USA) Eleni Hasaki, Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Arizona (USA) Miltiades B. Hatzopoulos, Director, Research Centre for Greek and Roman Antiquity, National Research Foundation, Athens (Greece) Wolf-Dieter Heilmeyer, Prof. Dr., Freie Universität Berlin und Antikensammlung der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin (Germany) Steven W. Hirsch, Associate Professor of Classics and History, Tufts University (USA) Karl-J. Hölkeskamp, Professor of Ancient History, University of Cologne (Germany) Frank L. Holt, Professor of Ancient History, University of Houston (USA) Dan Hooley, Professor of Classics, University of Missouri (USA) Meredith C. Hoppin, Gagliardi Professor of Classical Languages, Williams College, Williamstown, MA (USA) Caroline M. Houser, Professor of Art History Emerita, Smith College (USA) and Affiliated Professor, University of Washington (USA) Georgia Kafka, Visiting Professor of Modern Greek Language, Literature and History, University of New Brunswick (Canada) Anthony Kaldellis, Professor of Greek and Latin, The Ohio State University (USA) Andromache Karanika, Assistant Professor of Classics, University of California, Irvine (USA) Robert A. Kaster, Professor of Classics and Kennedy Foundation Professor of Latin, Princeton University (USA) Vassiliki Kekela, Adjunct Professor of Greek Studies, Classics Department, Hunter College, City University of New York (USA) Dietmar Kienast, Professor Emeritus of Ancient History, University of Duesseldorf (Germany) Karl Kilinski II, University Distinguished Teaching Professor, Southern Methodist University (USA) Dr. Florian Knauss, associate director, Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek Muenchen (Germany) Denis Knoepfler, Professor of Greek Epigraphy and History, Collège de France (Paris) Ortwin Knorr, Associate Professor of Classics, Willamette University (USA) Robert B. Koehl, Professor of Archaeology, Department of Classical and Oriental Studies Hunter College, City University of New York (USA) Georgia Kokkorou-Alevras, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Athens (Greece) Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Classical Studies, Brandeis University (USA) Eric J. Kondratieff, Assistant Professor of Classics and Ancient History, Department of Greek & Roman Classics, Temple University Haritini Kotsidu, Apl. Prof. Dr. für Klassische Archäologie, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt/M. (Germany) Lambrini Koutoussaki, Dr., Lecturer of Classical Archaeology, University of Zürich (Switzerland) David Kovacs, Hugh H. Obear Professor of Classics, University of Virginia (USA) Peter Krentz, W. R. Grey Professor of Classics and History, Davidson College (USA) Friedrich Krinzinger, Professor of Classical Archaeology Emeritus, University of Vienna (Austria) Michael Kumpf, Professor of Classics, Valparaiso University (USA) Donald G. Kyle, Professor of History, University of Texas at Arlington (USA) Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Helmut Kyrieleis, former president of the German Archaeological Institute, Berlin (Germany) Gerald V. Lalonde, Benedict Professor of Classics, Grinnell College (USA) Steven Lattimore, Professor Emeritus of Classics, University of California, Los Angeles (USA) Francis M. Lazarus, 
President, 
University of Dallas (USA) Mary R. Lefkowitz, Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, Emerita Wellesley College (USA) Iphigeneia Leventi, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Thessaly (Greece) Daniel B. Levine, Professor of Classical Studies, University of Arkansas (USA) Christina Leypold, Dr. phil., Archaeological Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland) Vayos Liapis, Associate Professor of Greek, Centre d’Études Classiques & Département de Philosophie, Université de Montréal (Canada) Hugh Lloyd-Jones, Professor of Greek Emeritus, University of Oxford (UK) Yannis Lolos, Assistant Professor, History, Archaeology, and Anthropology, University of Thessaly (Greece) Stanley Lombardo, Professor of Classics, University of Kansas, USA Anthony Long, Professor of Classics and Irving G. Stone Professor of Literature, University of California, Berkeley (USA) Julia Lougovaya, Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Columbia University (USA) A.D. Macro, Hobart Professor of Classical Languages emeritus, Trinity College (USA) John Magee, Professor, Department of Classics, Director, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto (Canada) Dr. Christofilis Maggidis, Associate Professor of Archaeology, Dickinson College (U.S.A.) Jeannette Marchand, Assistant Professor of Classics, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio (USA) Richard P. Martin, Antony and Isabelle Raubitschek Professor in Classics, Stanford University Maria Mavroudi, Professor of Byzantine History, University of California, Berkeley (U.S.A.) Alexander Mazarakis Ainian, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Thessaly (Greece) James R. McCredie, Sherman Fairchild Professor emeritus; Director, Excavations in Samothrace Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (USA) James C. McKeown, Professor of Classics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA) Robert A. Mechikoffm Professor and Life Member of the International Society of Olympic Historians, San Diego State University (USA) Andreas Mehl, Professor of Ancient History, Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg (Germany) Harald Mielsch, Professor of Classical Archeology, University of Bonn (Germany) Stephen G. Miller, Professor of Classical Archaeology Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley (USA) Phillip Mitsis, A.S. Onassis Professor of Classics and Philosophy, New York University (USA) Peter Franz Mittag, Professor für Alte Geschichte, Universität zu Köln (Germany) David Gordon Mitten, James Loeb Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology, Harvard University (USA) Margaret S. Mook, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, Iowa State University (USA) Anatole Mori, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, University of Missouri-Columbia (USA) Jennifer Sheridan Moss, Associate Professor, Wayne State University (USA) Ioannis Mylonopoulos, Assistant Professor of Greek Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, New York (USA). Richard Neudecker, PD of Classical Archaeology, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Rom (Italy) James M.L. Newhard, Associate Professor of Classics, College of Charleston (USA) Carole E. Newlands, Professor of Classics, University of Wisconsin, Madison (USA) John Maxwell O'Brien, Professor of History, Queens College, City University of New York (USA) James J. O'Hara, Paddison Professor of Latin, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA) Martin Ostwald, Professor of Classics (ret.), Swarthmore College and Professor of Classical Studies (ret.), University of Pennsylvania (USA) Olga Palagia, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Athens (Greece) Vassiliki Panoussi, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, The College of William and Mary (USA) Maria C. Pantelia, Professor of Classics, University of California, Irvine (USA) Pantos A.Pantos, Adjunct Faculty, Department of History, Archaeology and Social Anthropology, University of Thessaly (Greece) Anthony J. Papalas, Professor of Ancient History, East Carolina University (USA) Nassos Papalexandrou, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin (USA) Polyvia Parara, Visiting Assistant Professor of Greek Language and Civilization, Department of Classics, Georgetown University (USA) Richard W. Parker, Associate Professor of Classics, Brock University (Canada) Robert Parker, Wykeham Professor of Ancient History, New College, Oxford (UK) Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi, Associate Professor of Classics, Stanford University (USA) Jacques Perreault, Professor of Greek archaeology, Université de Montréal, Québec (Canada) Yanis Pikoulas, Associate Professor of Ancient Greek History, University of Thessaly (Greece) John Pollini, Professor of Classical Art & Archaeology, University of Southern California (USA) David Potter, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Greek and Latin. The University of Michigan (USA) Robert L. Pounder, Professor Emeritus of Classics, Vassar College (USA) Nikolaos Poulopoulos, Assistant Professor in History and Chair in Modern Greek Studies, McGill University (Canada) William H. Race, George L. Paddison Professor of Classics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) John T. Ramsey, Professor of Classics, University of Illinois at Chicago (USA) Karl Reber, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Lausanne (Switzerland) Rush Rehm, Professor of Classics and Drama, Stanford University (USA) Werner Riess, Associate Professor of Classics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) Robert H. Rivkin, Ancient Studies Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County (USA) Barbara Saylor Rodgers, Professor of Classics, The University of Vermont (USA) Robert H. Rodgers. Lyman-Roberts Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, University of Vermont (USA) Nathan Rosenstein, Professor of Ancient History, The Ohio State University (USA) John C. Rouman, Professor Emeritus of Classics, University of New Hampshire, (USA) Dr. James Roy, Reader in Greek History (retired), University of Nottingham (UK) Steven H. Rutledge, Associate Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, University of Maryland, College Park (USA) Christina A. Salowey, Associate Professor of Classics, Hollins University (USA) Guy D. R. Sanders, Resident Director of Corinth Excavations, The American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Greece) Theodore Scaltsas, Professor of Ancient Greek Philosophy, University of Edinburgh (UK) Thomas F. Scanlon, Professor of Classics, University of California, Riverside (USA) Bernhard Schmaltz, Prof. Dr. Archäologisches Institut der CAU, Kiel (Germany) Rolf M. Schneider, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany) Peter Scholz, Professor of Ancient History and Culture, University of Stuttgart (Germany) Christof Schuler, director, Commission for Ancient History and Epigraphy of the German Archaeological Institute, Munich (Germany) Paul D. Scotton, Assoociate Professor Classical Archaeology and Classics, California State University Long Beach (USA) Danuta Shanzer, Professor of Classics and Medieval Studies, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America (USA) James P. Sickinger, Associate Professor of Classics, Florida State University (USA) Marilyn B. Skinner 
Professor of Classics, 
University of Arizona (USA) Niall W. Slater, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Latin and Greek, Emory University (USA) Peter M. Smith, Associate Professor of Classics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) Dr. Philip J. Smith, Research Associate in Classical Studies, McGill University (Canada) Susan Kirkpatrick Smith Assistant Professor of Anthropology Kennesaw State University (USA) Antony Snodgrass, Professor Emeritus of Classical Archaeology, University of Cambridge (UK) Theodosia Stefanidou-Tiveriou, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece). Andrew Stewart, Nicholas C. Petris Professor of Greek Studies, University of California, Berkeley (USA) Oliver Stoll, Univ.-Prof. Dr., Alte Geschichte/ Ancient History,Universität Passau (Germany) Richard Stoneman, Honorary Fellow, University of Exeter (England) Ronald Stroud, Klio Distinguished Professor of Classical Languages and Literature Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley (USA) Sarah Culpepper Stroup, Associate Professor of Classics, University of Washington (USA) Nancy Sultan, Professor and Director, Greek & Roman Studies, Illinois Wesleyan University (USA) David W. Tandy, Professor of Classics, University of Tennessee (USA) James Tatum, Aaron Lawrence Professor of Classics, Dartmouth College Martha C. Taylor, Associate Professor of Classics, Loyola College in Maryland Petros Themelis, Professor Emeritus of Classical Archaeology, Athens (Greece) Eberhard Thomas, Priv.-Doz. Dr.,Archäologisches Institut der Universität zu Köln (Germany) Michalis Tiverios, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece) Michael K. Toumazou, Professor of Classics, Davidson College (USA) Stephen V. Tracy, Professor of Greek and Latin Emeritus, Ohio State University (USA) Prof. Dr. Erich Trapp, Austrian Academy of Sciences/Vienna resp. University of Bonn (Germany) Stephen M. Trzaskoma, Associate Professor of Classics, University of New Hampshire (USA) Vasiliki Tsamakda, Professor of Christian Archaeology and Byzantine History of Art, University of Mainz (Germany) Christopher Tuplin, Professor of Ancient History, University of Liverpool (UK) Gretchen Umholtz, Lecturer, Classics and Art History, University of Massachusetts, Boston (USA) Panos Valavanis, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Athens (Greece) Athanassios Vergados, Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, PA Christina Vester, Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Waterloo (Canada) Emmanuel Voutiras, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece) Speros Vryonis, Jr., Alexander S. Onassis Professor (Emeritus) of Hellenic Civilization and Culture, New York University (USA) Michael B. Walbank, Professor Emeritus of Greek, Latin & Ancient History, The University of Calgary (Canada) Bonna D. Wescoat, Associate Professor, Art HIstory and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Emory University (USA) E. Hector Williams, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of British Columbia (Canada) Roger J. A. Wilson, Professor of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire, and Director, Centre for the Study of Ancient Sicily, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada) Engelbert Winter, Professor for Ancient History, University of Münster (Germany) Timothy F. Winters, Ph.D. Alumni Assn. Distinguished Professor of Classics Austin Peay State University (USA) Ian Worthington, Frederick A. Middlebush Professor of History, University of Missouri-Columbia (USA) Michael Zahrnt, Professor für Alte Geschichte, Universität zu Köln (Germany) Paul Zanker, Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies, University of Munich (Germany) Froma I. Zeitlin, Ewing Professor of Greek Language & Literature, Professor of Comparative Literature, Princeton University (USA)
    3 Scholars added on June 25th 2009:

    Jerker Blomqvist, Professor emeritus of Greek Language and literature, Lund University (Sweden)

    Christos Karakolis, Assistant Professor of New Testament, University of Athens (Greece)

    Chrys C. Caragounis, Professor emeritus of New Testament Exegesis and the development of the Greek language since ancient times, Lund University (Sweden)

    5 Scholars added on June 29th 2009:

    Harold D. Evjen, Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder (USA)

    Hara Tzavella-Evjen, Professor Emerita of Classical Archaeology, University of Colorado at Boulder (USA)

    Michael Paschalis, Professor of Classics, Department of Philology, University of Crete, Rethymnon (Greece)

    Vrasidas Karalis, Professor, New Testament Studies, The University of Sydney (Australia)

    Emilio Crespo, Professor of Greek Philology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2 Scholars added on July 8th 2009:

    Dr. Zoi Kotitsa, Archaeologist, Scientific research fellow, University of Marburg (Germany)

    Dr. Ekaterini Tsalampouni, Assistant Lecturer in New Testament, Graeco-Roman antiquity and Koine Greek, Ludwig-Maximillian University of Munich (Germany)

    2 Scholars added on July 18th 2009:

    Karol Myśliwiec, Professor Dr., Director of the Research Centre for Mediterranean Archaeology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    Stephen Neale, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Linguistics, John H. Kornblith Family Chair in the Philosophy of Science and Values, City University of New York (USA)

    1 Scholar added on July 20th 2009:

    Marsh McCall, Professor Emeritus, Department of Classics, Stanford University (USA)

    1 Scholar added on August 10th 2009:

    Georgia Tsouvala, Assistant Professor of History, Illinois State University (USA)

    1 Scholar added on September 3rd 2009:

    Mika Rissanen, PhL, Ancient History, University of Jyvaskyla (Finland)



    2 Scholars added on October 10th 2009:

    José Antonio Fernández Delgado. Professor of Greek Philology, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    Zinon Papakonstantinou, Assistant Professor of Hellenic Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington, Seattle (USA)

    1 Scholar added on October 17th 2009:

    Eugene Afonasin, Professor of Greek Philosophy and of Roman Law, Novosibirsk State University (Russia)

    1 Scholar added on October 28th 2009:

    Hartmut Wolff, Professor für Alte Geschichte (emeritus), Universität Passau (Germany)

    1 Scholar added on October 30th 2009:

    Eleni Manakidou, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristoteles University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    1 Scholar added on November 3rd 2009:

    Pavlos Sfyroeras, Associate Professor of Classics, Middlebury College (USA)

    1 Scholar added on November 11th 2009:

    Konstantinos Kapparis, Associate Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, University of Florida (USA)

    1 Scholar added on November 14th 2009:

    Prof. Dr. Ingomar Weiler, Professor Emeritus, Ancient Greek and Roman History, Karl-Franzens-Universität of Graz (Austria)

    1 Scholar added on November 15th 2009:

    Werner Petermandl, Universitätslektor, Karl-Franzens-Universität of Graz (Austria)

    1 Scholar added on December 4th 2009:

    István Kertész, Professor of ancient Greco-Roman history, Department of Ancient and Medieval History, Pedagogic College in Eger (Hungary)

    1 Scholar added on March 11th 2010:

    Nassi Malagardis, chargée de Mission au Département des Antiquités Grecques, Etrusques et Romaines du Musée du Louvre, Paris (France)

    2 Scholars added on March 25th 2010:

    Gonda Van Steen, Professor, Department of Classics, University of Florida (USA)

    Robert Wagman, Associate Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, University of Florida (USA)

    2 Scholars added on March 27th 2010:

    Angelos Barmpotis, Ph.D., Director of the Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project, University of Florida (USA)

    Eleni Bozia, Ph.D. Visiting Lecturer, Department of Classics, University of Florida (USA)

    1 Scholar added on April 16th 2010:

    Timothy Johnson, Associate Professor, Department of Classics, University of Florida (USA)

    1 Scholar added on April 17th 2010:

    Christos C. Tsagalis, Associate Professor of Classics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    1 Scholar added on August 31st 2010:

    Potitsa Grigorakou, Lecturer in Hellenism in the Orient, Public University of Athens (Greece)

    2 Scholars added on September 3rd 2010:

    Maurice Sartre, Professor of Ancient History, emeritus. Université François-Rabelais, Tours (France)

    Apostolos Bousdroukis, Researcher, Institute for Greek and Roman Antiquity, National Hellenic Research Foundation (Greece)

    1 Scholar added on September 10th 2010:

    Alastar Jackson, Hon. Research Fellow in Ancient History, Manchester University (U.K.)

    1 Scholar added on October 5th 2010:

    Frances Van Keuren, Professor Emerita of Ancient Art History, University of Georgia (USA)

    1 Scholar added on December 4th 2010:

    Thomas Heine Nielsen, Associate Professor of Ancient Greek, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1 Scholar added on April 18th 2011:

    Antonis Bartsiokas, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of History and Ethnology, University of Thrace (Greece)

    1 Scholar added on October 16th 2011:

    Thanasis Maskaleris, Emeritus Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature, San Francisco State University (USA)

    (as of midnight, October 16, 2011; updates at Macedonia Evidence) =================

    THE LIST OF CO-SIGNERS IS 372



    cc: J. Biden, Vice President, USA H. Clinton, Secretary of State USA P. Gordon, Asst. Secretary-designate, European and Eurasian Affairs H.L Berman, Chair, House Committee on Foreign Affairs I. Ros-Lehtinen, Ranking Member, House Committee on Foreign Affairs J. Kerry, Chair, Senate Committee on Foreign Relations R.G. Lugar, Ranking Member, Senate Committee on Foreign Relations R. Mendenez, United States Senator from New Jersey.



    http://panmacedonian.info/index.php?...news&Itemid=50






    von daher erwarte meinerseits keine antwort mehr auf deinen kindermist die geschichte ist geschrieben und kann nicht einfach so verändert werden



    die griechen sollten zoran einfach auf igno setzen und diesen troll nicht mehr füttern


    denn ihr müsst nichts beweisen

  3. #383
    Avatar von Zoran

    Registriert seit
    10.08.2011
    Beiträge
    27.754
    Zitat Zitat von economicos Beitrag anzeigen
    Naja, sag was du willst. Aber warum sagen/schreiben 95% der anerkannten Historiker das Gegenteil über Makedonien? In jeder Doku werden die als Hellenen bzw. Griechen bezeichnet

    Natürlich, aber nur Dummköpfe wie du können nicht zwischen einem Antikem Griechen und zwischen der heutigen Modernen Nation unterscheiden. Viel schlimmer noch ihr zieht eine direkte Linie und lässt so manche wichtige Epoche aus.


    Aber irgendwann, werdet ihr es schnallen, aber dann ist es zu spät.

  4. #384
    economicos
    Zitat Zitat von Zoran Beitrag anzeigen
    Natürlich, aber nur Dummköpfe wie du können nicht zwischen einem Antikem Griechen und zwischen der heutigen Modernen Nation unterscheiden. Viel schlimmer noch ihr zieht eine direkte Linie und lässt so manche wichtige Epoche aus.


    Aber irgendwann, werdet ihr es schnallen, aber dann ist es zu spät.
    Der Beitrag macht kein Sinn, naja nichts neues von dir

  5. #385
    Avatar von Zoran

    Registriert seit
    10.08.2011
    Beiträge
    27.754
    Zitat Zitat von De_La_GreCo Beitrag anzeigen
    der junge kommt auch immer mit den selben quellen


    zoran siehs ein auf dieses ping pong spiel habe ich kein bock





    die historiker der welt sind sich einig

    von daher müssen wir gar nichts beweisen sondern lediglich du





    von daher erwarte meinerseits keine antwort mehr auf deinen kindermist die geschichte ist geschrieben und kann nicht einfach so verändert werden



    die griechen sollten zoran einfach auf igno setzen und diesen troll nicht mehr füttern


    denn ihr müsst nichts beweisen

    Und schon wieder, wieder wird versucht gewisses Wunschdenken hier als Tatsache zu verkaufen. Das sich die Historiker gar nicht so einig sind, zeigen die unzähligen Reaktionen die Millers Aktion hervor rief.

    Wie zb das hier
    F.A.Z.-Community


    Mr. President, Alexander der Große war kein Slave! – Ein peinlicher geschichtspolitischer Aufruf

    18. Mai 2009, 08:44 Uhr
    Kürzlich erreichte mich eine Rundmail. Stephen G. Miller, pensionierter amerikanischer Altertumswissenschaftler an der University of California in Berkeley und Spezialist für griechischen Sport, bittet darin um Unterstützung für einen Brief an Präsident Obama, in dem auf einen geschichtspolitischen Skandal aufmerksam gemacht werden soll. Worum geht es?
    Seit 1991 gibt es den unabhängigen Staat Mazedonien. Die griechische Regierung betrachtete dessen Benennung von Anfang an als Provokation, weil sie Gebietsansprüche Mazedoniens auf die nordgriechische Provinz Makedonien befürchtete, und leistete hinhaltenden Widerstand gegen eine Integration des neuen Staates in internationale Organisationen; 1994 verhängte Athen sogar eine Grenzblockade. Seit 1993 ist das kleine Land (ca. 25.000 qkm, ca. zwei Millionen Einwohner) Mitglied der Vereinten Nationen, und zwar unter dem Namen „Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" (FYROM); die Griechen nennen das Land nach seiner Hauptstadt Skopje. 1996 wurde Mazedonien von der Bundesrepublik Deutschland völkerrechtlich anerkannt, Ende 2005 erhielt das Land den EU-Kandidatenstatus. Eine Volkszählung ermittelte 2003 etwa 65 % Mazedonier und 25 % Albaner, dazu kommen kleinere Minderheiten - die typische Gemengelage auf dem Balkan eben.
    Es überrascht nun nicht, wenn die Regierung und die Eliten eines solchen politisch und ethnisch zerklüfteten, dazu nicht mit Wohlstand gesegneten Neu-Staates - „a poor land-locked new state" wird er in dem Brief an Obama genannt - nach einem Ankerpunkt für Identität und Integration suchen. Angesichts der immer wieder aufkochenden Konflikte mit der albanischen Minderheit und der mangelnden ethnischen Distinktion der Mehrheitsbevölkerung - die Encyclopedia Britannica formuliert vorsichtig: „In language, religion, and history, a case could be made for identifying Macedonian Slavs with Bulgarians and to a lesser extent with Serbs." - konnte es daher naheliegen, auf eine große und zugleich von den heutigen Ethnizitäten noch nichts wissende Vergangenheit zurückzugreifen. Und da bot sich die Antike an, genauer: das antike Makedonien, das unter Philipp II. zur Vormacht über Hellas wurde und mit Philipps Sohn Alexander den größten Eroberer der antiken Welt hervorbrachte.

    Der Warnruf ertönt jetzt, weil Skopje den Rekurs auf das antike Makedonien offenbar auszubauen im Begriff ist, über den Namen und die Flagge mit dem sog. Stern von Vergina hinaus. Der Flughafen der Hauptstadt und eine neue Transitstraße heißen nach Alexander, das neue nationale Sportstadion nach Philipp. Überall stünden Alexanderstatuen mit slavischen Inschriften herum - „Alexander the Great has become Slavic". Miller sieht durch derlei usurpatorische Umtriebe die Integrität der Wissenschaft bedroht, weil hier Fakten verdreht würden. Dagegen müßten die Historiker sich wehren. Man kann es nun sicher als ärgerlich empfinden, wenn nicht nur mazedonische Zeitungen derlei Identitätsbehauptungen aufstellen, sondern auch ein Periodikum des angesehenen Archaeological Institute of America einen Artikel unter dem Titel „Owning Alexander: Modern Macedonia lays its claim to the ancient conqueror's legacy" veröffentlicht. Was aber irritiert, ist die alarmistische Erregung, mit der die Einrede vorgetragen wird. Was sei Geschichtswissenschaft für die Gesellschaft noch wert, wenn Geschichte zu derartigen partikularen und tagespolitischen Zielen (specific ephemeral goals) zurechtgezimmert werden könne? Nun haben Historiker derartige Bemühungen noch selten nachhaltig unterbinden können; was sie tun können, muß sich darauf beschränken, ihre Wahrheitssuche so ernsthaft wie nur möglich zu betreiben und sich selbst wie auch dem Publikum immer wieder klarzumachen, daß historische Erkenntnis perspektivisch gebunden, aber deshalb nicht beliebig ist. Man hätte auch ein besseres Gefühl, wenn nicht der Eindruck aufkäme, daß hier die „specific ephemeral goals" der Griechen verfolgt werden, denen sich Miller und die zahlreichen Unterzeichner zweifellos (und mit guten Gründen) eng verbunden fühlen.
    Statt dessen pflegt die Einladung die Rhetorik des underdogs: „If we had the ear of the general public, it might be possible to present the facts." Regierung und nationalistische Eliten eines balkanischen Transitlandes expandieren hier auf das Maß einer weltweit agierenden Zensurbehörde, weswegen Dutzende von gut vernetzten, medienerfahrenen Intellektuellen aus den USA, England und Deutschland mit Zugang zu Zeitungen, dem Buchmarkt und dem Internet ungehört bleiben - eine seltsam verquere Vorstellung.
    Jedenfalls soll es nun der Präsident richten. In selten plumper Weise suggeriert das an die „Dear Colleagues" gerichtete Einladungsschreiben zur Petition, Obama müsse nun auch auf diesem Feld das Versagen seines Vorgängers korrigieren. Dabei wiederholt man zugleich die Allmachtsphantasien des Gescholtenen, wenn unterstellt wird, die Anerkennung Mazedoniens durch die USA im November 2004 sei zweifellos „der Katalysator für die Phantasien von einem slavischen Alexander" gewesen - als ob die Aufnahme in die Vereinten Nationen und die Anerkennung durch europäische Staaten keine Bedeutung gehabt habe. Obama wird am Ende noch regelrecht für dumm verkauft, mit der allzu durchsichtigen rhetorischen Frage nämlich, ob der Irakkrieg jemals begonnen worden wäre, wenn George W. Bush Thukydides' siebtes Buch- die Schilderung der katastrophal scheiternden Invasion der Großmacht Athen auf Sizilien - gelesen hätte. Von der völlig realitätsfernen, peinlichen Selbstüberschätzung einer im Konzert der Disziplinen doch eher randständigen Geisteswissenschaft, wie sie die Alte Geschichte nun einmal darstellt, einmal abgesehen.
    Politisch kommt das Papier mal naiv, mal halsbrecherisch daher, und man möchte dies nur zu gern einer gewissen Weltfremdheit und Ahnungslosigkeit des Verfassers zuschreiben. Naiv: „Many of us would prefer to avoid politics, but the politicians obviously are not consulting with us and we must, therefore, go to them. We must make history a part of our common experience. For us that means ancient history, and just now Macedonia." Halsbrecherisch: „There is ... the international notion that the USA can effect just about anything it wants with smaller countries." Soll das etwa bedeuten: Das kleine Mazedonien wird leicht zur Räson zu bringen sein, sobald die USA den großen Hammer hervorholen? Man kann nur hoffen, daß im Weißen Haus niemand dieses Unterschriftensammelschreiben zu Gesicht bekommt. Naivität und Dreistigkeit paaren sich dann schließlich in der Hoffnung, Präsident Obama möge es doch erst gemeint haben mit seiner Ankündigung „an administration based on science" führen zu wollen.
    Immerhin, was er tun soll, wird nicht vorgegeben. Mazedonien werde seinen Namen wohl behalten können. Aber wenn Obama eine Verbundenheit mit den historischen Fakten an den Tag lege und seine Politik davon leiten lasse, dann werde Alexander auch wieder erlaubt, Griechisch zu lesen und zu schreiben („If he can show an adherence to historical fact with regard to Alexander, and let that dictate his policy, then perhaps Alexander can be allowed to read and write Greek."). Nicht gesagt wird, wer dem antiken Makedonenkönig, der seit mehr als zweitausenddreihundert Jahren tot ist, dies denn heuer verboten hat.

    Der Brief an den Präsidenten selbst, mit dem Datum von heute, ist dann zum Glück mit etwas mehr Bedacht formuliert. Aber auch er versucht gleich zu Beginn, Obama auf das Ausmisten des vom Amtsvorgänger hinterlassenen Stalles festzulegen („to clean up some of the historical debris left in southeast Europe by the previous U.S. administration"), ohne zu merken, daß es etwas anderes ist, solches als Quasi-Lobbyist einzumahnen, als wenn der Präsident aus eigener Initiative dieses oder jenes seiner Wahlversprechen einlöst. Die „gefährliche Epidemie des historischen Revisionismus" durch Skopje äußere sich in der widerrechtlichen Aneignung (misappropriation) Alexanders d.Gr. Die schlampige Wortwahl dürfte den Juristen Obama beleidigen. Merriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary gibt für to appropriate u.a. folgende Bedeutungen an: „to take exclusive possession of", „to take or make use of without authority or right"; to misappropriate wird mit „to appropriate wrongly (as by theft)" definiert. Aber selbst wenn Mazedonien sich Philipp und Alexander als nationale Heroen „aneignet", handelt es sich um eine rein gedankliche Zuschreibung, die niemandem etwas wegnimmt, solange er kein Copyright auf das Objekt hat. Von Diebstahl - so aber im weiteren Verlauf des Briefes auch explizit (theft) - kann also ernsthaft keine Rede sein. Und ‘nationale' geschichtspolitische Traditionsstiftungen, etwa die enge Verknüpfung von Arminius und der deutschen Freiheit in unseren Tagen, mögen begründet oder unplausibel oder dumm erscheinen - eine Instanz, die ihnen Autorität oder gar Rechtmäßigkeit verleiht, kann es nicht geben. Wollten Historiker eine solche sein, würden sie von Wissenschaftlern zu Ideologen.
    Anschließend erhält der Präsident ein kurzes Privatissimum zur Geographie und Geschichte der Region, in Fußnoten versehen mit Quellennachweisen und weiteren Erläuterungen (vgl. auch hier). Was sich heute Mazedonien nenne, sei in der Antike Land der Paionen gewesen, von Makedonien durch natürliche Barrieren getrennt und seit 358 v.Chr. Teil des makedonischen Herrschaftsgebietes. Doch niemand käme auf die Idee, so die plumpe Analogie, das von Alexander d.Gr. eroberte und danach von makedonischen Königen regierte Ägypten deshalb Makedonien zu nennen. Dagegen seien Alexander, sein Vater und dessen Vorfahren (!) „durch und durch und unbestreitbar" Griechen/griechisch gewesen. Der Präsident wird dann mit einer Auflistung von Indizien für die Behauptung belästigt, erfährt aber nicht, daß die makedonischen Könige sich zwar aktiv an die griechische Leitkultur anschlossen, die Zugehörigkeit der Makedonen zu den Hellenen aber in der Antike notorisch umstritten war. Die Athener, die Bewohner des durch Alexander zerstörten Theben und die von seinem Verbanntendekret betroffenen griechischen Städte jedenfalls hätten sich schön bedankt, den Makedonenkönig als Griechen zu betrachten - einen König, der später vornehme Perser in die Elite seines Reiches aufnahm, die griechischen Truppen in seinem Heer aber nach Hause schickte.
    Die Argumentation häuft einzelne Fakten und garniert sie mit rhetorischen Analogien und dogmatischen Schlußfolgerungen. Vollends nicht mehr allein dem wackeren Stephen Miller zuschreiben möchte man den nächsten Gedanken: Alexander d.Gr. war Grieche, kein Slave; die Slaven und ihre Sprache kamen erst tausend Jahre nach Alexander in die Nähe seiner Heimat. Abgesehen davon, daß der Altersbeweis nun wirklich ein antiquitiertes Argument darstellt: Kann der emphatisch betonte Gegensatz zwischen Griechen und Slaven einem Altertumswissenschaftler an einer liberalen kalifornischen Universität so am Herzen liegen? Oder die Entführung einer vollständig griechischen Gestalt mit dem Zweck, sie in Skopje zum Nationalheros zu machen? Miller müßte wissen, daß die heutigen Bewohner Mazedoniens mit den antiken Makedonen nicht mehr und nicht weniger zusammenhängen oder gar ‘identisch' sind als die Bürger des modernen Staates Griechenland nach zahlreichen Migrationen und kulturellen Umprägungen über mehr als ein Jahrtausend hin mit den antiken Hellenen. Der Rückgriff auf die alten Hellenen wurde nach der Staatsgründung 1832 unternommen, um einer nach über vierhundert Jahren osmanischer Fremdherrschaft desorientierten und von Faktionen zerrissenen Bewohnerschaft eine einigende Identität zu geben und einen Anknüpfungspunkt für eine neue nationale Kultur. Daß Hellas Heimat von Platon und Phidias war, nutzte den Griechen in einem von Winckelmann, Goethe und Byron für die Antike begeisterten Europa, und ihr Anspruch, die erste Demokratie der Weltgeschichte beherbergt zu haben, kommt ihnen in der EU durchaus zugute. Aber der Charakter solcher Selbstverortungen und Vereinnahmungen sollte doch im Kern unstrittig sein. Zu den Unterzeichnern gehören einige Gelehrte, die sich in ihrer wissenschaftlichen Arbeit intensiv mit der Konstruktion von Ethnizität und der „invention of tradition" befaßt haben. Wie sie in einem Atemzug sowohl einer gleich doppelten Identitätsbehauptung (antike Makedonen waren Griechen → Alexander d.Gr. gehört dem heutigen Griechenland) als auch einer Differenzbehauptung (moderne Mazedonier sind Slaven, haben also mit den antiken Mekedonen nichts zu tun) zustimmen konnten, bliebt unerfindlich.
    Doch der Brief beläßt es nicht bei der ethnisch-‘historischen' Argumentation, in der vermutlich zutreffenden Annahme, dies könnte den US-Präsidenten nicht besonders interessieren. Vielmehr bestehe eine reale politische Gefahr, da bereits im späten Neunzehnten Jahrhundert der Mißbrauch des Makedonennamens ungesunde Gebietsansprüche impliziert habe. Auch jetzt gebe es wieder Schulwandkarten, Kalender und Banknoten, die ein Großmazedonien von Skopje bis zum Olymp vorstellten. Altertumswissenschaftler in vorderster Front für den Frieden auf dem Balkan? Auch diese schöne Illusion wird etwas getrübt, nämlich durch den Hinweis, die antiken Paionen (= heutigen Mazedonier) seien in der Antike von Philipp II. unterworfen worden und hätten so einen Teil des Makedonischen Reiches gebildet. Legitime Erben Philipps und Alexanders aber sind, wie zuvor bewiesen, usw. usf. Honi soit qui mal y pense.
    „We call upon you, Mr. President, to help - in whatever ways you deem appropriate - the government in Skopje to understand that it cannot build a national identity at the expense of historic truth. Our common international society cannot survive when history is ignored, much less when history is fabricated." Der Brief trägt etwa siebzig Unterschriften, darunter die von namhaften deutschen Althistorikern und Archäologen. Man möchte hoffen, sie hätten den Brief an den Präsidenten nur oberflächlich, das Einladungsschreiben gar nicht gelesen, sondern sich auf die Empfehlung und den guten Namen ihrer bereits zuvor unterzeichnet habenden Kollegen verlassen. Andernfalls müßte man ihrer politischen Urteilsfähigkeit ein miserables Zeugnis ausstellen.

  6. #386

    Registriert seit
    23.03.2012
    Beiträge
    970
    Man beachte bitte nur folgende Videos:



    Insbesondere die Bereiche: 4:19-4:23; 6:35-Ende

    Weiterhin:



    Ohne das drumherum, bitte nur die Aussage vom Aussenminister beachten.

    Dazu noch dieses sehr bekannte Video:



    Neben den Großmakedonischen Karten bitte das Bild bei 3:11 beachten.

    Hier noch Kiro Gligorov: We are slavs...



    und Denko Maleski



    Also ein wenig hat Griechenland auch Schuld an der Antik-Histerie in Skopje.


    Dennoch, soll Griechenland tatenlos zusehen und sich nichts weiter denken?


    Den Ex-Regierungschef der nun Bulgare ist lasse ich mal aussen vor.

    Abschließend ein Zitat

    Krste Crvenkovski, President of the Central Committee of the Union of Communists in the Socialist Republic of Macedonia, to Todor Zhivkov, First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Bulgaria (May 19, 1967)
    “And whether bulgarian consciousness exists in Macedonia, this is a historical legacy. We’re now writing our history. We can’t write that until 1940 we were Bulgarians and after 1940 Macedonians.”



    Krste Crvenkovski.png

    Mahlzeit!

  7. #387
    Avatar von Zoran

    Registriert seit
    10.08.2011
    Beiträge
    27.754
    Zitat Zitat von economicos Beitrag anzeigen
    Der Beitrag macht kein Sinn, naja nichts neues von dir

    Natürlich macht er Sinn, du als Moderner Grieche ignorierst -wie immer- die Tatsachen das die Moderne griechische Nation wie jedes andere Balkanvolk eine Mischnation ist. Slawen, Albaner, Türken, Vlachen, Bulgaren, Armenier, georgier, Juden etc...von Griechen, die wenigste Spur.

  8. #388
    Avatar von Zoran

    Registriert seit
    10.08.2011
    Beiträge
    27.754
    Zitat Zitat von laola999 Beitrag anzeigen
    Man beachte bitte nur folgende Videos:



    Insbesondere die Bereiche: 4:19-4:23; 6:35-Ende

    Weiterhin:



    Ohne das drumherum, bitte nur die Aussage vom Aussenminister beachten.

    Dazu noch dieses sehr bekannte Video:



    Neben den Großmakedonischen Karten bitte das Bild bei 3:11 beachten.

    Hier noch Kiro Gligorov: We are slavs...



    und Denko Maleski



    Also ein wenig hat Griechenland auch Schuld an der Antik-Histerie in Skopje.


    Dennoch, soll Griechenland tatenlos zusehen und sich nichts weiter denken?


    Den Ex-Regierungschef der nun Bulgare ist lasse ich mal aussen vor.

    Abschließend ein Zitat

    Krste Crvenkovski, President of the Central Committee of the Union of Communists in the Socialist Republic of Macedonia, to Todor Zhivkov, First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Bulgaria (May 19, 1967)
    “And whether bulgarian consciousness exists in Macedonia, this is a historical legacy. We’re now writing our history. We can’t write that until 1940 we were Bulgarians and after 1940 Macedonians.”



    Krste Crvenkovski.png

    Mahlzeit!




    Ich stehe da eher auf Literatur, du als Vollpfosten pflasterst lieber mit Youtube Videos deinen Weg....

  9. #389

    Registriert seit
    23.03.2012
    Beiträge
    970
    Das sind moderne Aussagen Deiner Politiker lieber Zoran. Aber klar, nicht mal das akzeptierst du.

  10. #390
    economicos
    Zitat Zitat von Zoran Beitrag anzeigen
    Natürlich macht er Sinn, du als Moderner Grieche ignorierst -wie immer- die Tatsachen das die Moderne griechische Nation wie jedes andere Balkanvolk eine Mischnation ist. Slawen, Albaner, Türken, Vlachen, Bulgaren, Armenier, georgier, Juden etc...von Griechen, die wenigste Spur.
    Eig nicht, wenn du mich schon als Dummpfbacke bezeichnest, lese ich mir doch dein Scheiß nicht an. Also lass es am besten sein, ich war nicht beleidigend, du aber schon

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Interessanter Bericht über Bözemann
    Von Syndikata im Forum Musik
    Antworten: 15
    Letzter Beitrag: 15.01.2013, 15:30
  2. BND Bericht über das Kosovo und der Banden
    Von TeslaNikola im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 19
    Letzter Beitrag: 17.07.2009, 18:20
  3. Sehr interessanter Text über SCG!!!
    Von Montenegrin im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 7
    Letzter Beitrag: 13.05.2006, 23:35
  4. Bericht über Alexander dem Großen
    Von Albanesi2 im Forum Politik
    Antworten: 9
    Letzter Beitrag: 22.11.2005, 21:42